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THE 



NEW ENGLAND 



HISTORICAL AND GENEALOGICAL 



REGISTER 



1911 



Volume LXV 




BOSTON 

PUBLISHED BY THE SOCIETY 

19 1 1 



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fEMtcr 

F. APTHORP FOSTER 



Pufrltsjfng Committee 

HENRY WINCHESTER CUNNINGHAM CHARLES KNOWLES BOLTON 

EDMUND DANA BARBOUR HENRY EDWARDS SCOTT 

F. APTHORP FOSTER 






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INDEX OF SUBJECTS 






ADAM genealogy, by G. A. Dejordy noticed 
302 

ADAMS genealogy, descendants of Elijah, in 
preparation 191 
descendants of George, in preparation 302 

Adventure, ship, passengers for Md. 1775 30 
125 

AGASSIZ, Alexander, memoir, by A. G. Mayer 
noticed 303 

Alabama claims, Geneva tribunal of arbitra- 
tion 1872, history, by F.-W. Hackett no- 
ticed 304 

Albany, N. Y., State library, fire, 1911 300 

Albion, ship, passengers for St. Vincent 1775 
25 

ALDEN, John Eaton, notice Ix 

ALEXANDER letters, 1789-1900, with intro- 
duction, by M. A. Boggs and G. J. Bald- 
win noticed 192 

ALLEN, Orrin Peer Descendants of Nicho- 
las Cady of Watertown, Mass., 1645-1910 
noticed 90 
Supplement to descendants of Nicholas 
Cady of Watertown, Mass., 1645-1911, 
with additions and corrections noticed 
384 
Rev. William, records of marriages in Green- 
land, N. H., 1710-34 351 

American Antiquarian Society, manuscript 
collections, by CH. Lincoln noticed 386 

American Historical Association, report 1908 
noticed 204 

American Revolution, Beaumarchais's services 
in the, essay, by B. E. Hazard noticed 
305 
beginnings of, based on contemporary let- 
ters, diaries, and other documents, by E. 
Chase noticed 205 

Amherst College, general catalogue 1821-1910 
noticed 204 

Ancestry, American, genealogical history of 
families of Washington, Lee, Reade, 
Prescott, Taylor, Saltonstall, Watson, 
&c, in Of Sceptred Race, by A. R. Wat- 
son noticed 198 

Andover, Mass., vital records to 1850, vols. 1 
and 2 noticed 100 

Andover, N. H., history and genealogy, 1751- 
1906, by J. R. Eastman noticed 199 

ANDREWS, Frank De Wette Hartford city 
directory, 1799 noticed 98 
Inscriptions in the first "Old Cohansey" 
burying ground, Hopewell, N. J., with 
historical sketch noticed 305 

ANGELL, Frank C Annals of Centerdale in 
the town of North Providence, R. I., 
1636-1909 noticed 200 



Ann, ship, passengers for Philadelphia, 1775 
31 

ANNABLE, Anthony, notice 380 

Anne and Sarah, ship, passengers for Va. 1700 
43 

ARCHIB VLD, William Charles Home mak- 
ing and its philosophy, illustrated by a 
nesting branch of the Archibalds noticed 
102 

ARCHIBALD genealogical history, by W. C. 
Archibald noticed 102 

Ashton Hall, ship, passengers for Md. 1775 129 

ATKINS, Elizabeth, notice 293 

ATWOOD, genealogy, descendants of Har- 
mon, in preparation 302 

AVERELL genealogy, descendants of Wm., 
in preparation 302 

AYER, Dr. James Bourne, notice 252 
Richard G., record of family 294 
Sarah Connell, diary 1805-35 noticed 303 

BABCOCK genealogy, descendants of Nathan- 
iel, by C. H. Brown noticed 302 

BACON, Jonathan, memoir, by C. E. Mann 
noticed 303 
William Plumb Bibliography of class books, 
class records, Yale University, 1792-1910 
noticed 204 

BAILEY, Guy W. Vermont legislative di- 
rectory. Biennial session, 1910 noticed 
206 

BAKER, Mary Ellen Bibliography of lists of 
New England soldiers 11 151 305 

BALDWIN, Thomas Williams The Drury 

death book 356 
Vital records of Framingham, Mass. to 

1850 noticed 203 
Vital records of Hull, Mass. to 1850 noticed 

204 
Vital records of Sherborn, Mass. to 1850 

noticed 204 

BALDWIN genealogy, descendants of Elias 
Jones, in preparation 191 

Baltimore, ship, passengers for Baltimore 1775 
233 

Baltimore Packet, ship, passengers for Md. 1775 
29 

BANGS, James, will 1810 378 

BANNING genealogy in preparation 89 

BARBOUR, Fannie Cooley Williams Spelman 
genealogy. English ancestry and Ameri- 
can descendants of Richard Spelman of 
Middletown, Conn., 1700 noticed 196 

BARBOUR genealogy and history of descend- 
ants of Dryden, by C. R. Green noticed 
302 



Index of Subjects 



BARNES, Abel Tuttle Ancestors and de- 
scendants of Capt. Benjamin Barnes and 
Charles Curtiss of Granville, Mass. no- 
ticed 302 
Harriet Southworth (Lewis) Lewis, with 
collateral lines, Andrews, Belden, Bron- 
son, Butler, Gillett, Newell, Peck, Stan- 
ley, Wright, and others noticed 93 
Smith, with collateral lines, Chipman, Di- 
vine, Hnckins, Jones, Lewis (Barnstable 
branch) noticed 95 

BARNES genealogy, descendants of Capt. 
Benjamin of Granville, Mass., by A. T. 
Barnes noticed 302 

BARNEY, Everett Hosmer James Hay ward, 
born 1750; with genealogical notes relat- 
ing to the Haywards noticed 194 
George Murray, lineage, in Staples. Weal- 
thea Staples noticed 384 

BARNWELL, Joseph Walker Dr. Henry 
Woodward, first English settler in South 
Carolina, and descendants noticed 197 

BARRELL, George, will 1620 74 
Jacob, will 1621 75 

BARTLET, Gideon, administration of estate 
1802 374 

BARTLETT, John H. Marriages by Rev. Wm. 
Allen of Greenland, N. H. 351 
Joseph Gardner Robert Coe, Puritan, his 
ancestors and descendants, 1340-1910, 
with notices of other Coe families noticed 
384 

BARTON, Rufus, notice of family 380 

BATES, William Carver, notice with auto- 
graph and portrait 307 

BATES bulletin, vol. 4, no. 1 noticed 193; no. 
2 noticed 302 

BAXTER, Hon. James Phinney Address be- 
fore N. E. Hist. Gen. Society 1911 ix 
Sylvester Golden New England noticed 200 

BEALE, Henry, notice 298 

BEALL, Col. Ninian, memoir, in Historical 
Papers of the Society of Colonial Wars 
in the District of Columbia, 1911 noticed 
303 
BEALS, Joseph Eber, notice xlvii 
BEAMAN genealogy, descendants of Gamaliel, 
by E. B. Wooden noticed 90 

Beaufort, ship, passengers for Ga. 1775 242 

BEAUMARCHAIS, Pierre Augustin Caron 
de, and the American Revolution, essay, 
by B. E. Hazard noticed 305 

BEEM AN genealogy, descendants of Simon, in 
preparation 191 

BELKNAP genealogy, descendants of Abra- 
ham, in preparation 191 

BENJAMIN, Marcus Gilbert Thompson. Me- 
morial papers of the Society of Colonial 
Wars in the District of Columbia, 1910 
noticed 199 

Betsey, ship, passengers for Va. 1775 116 

BICKNELL Family Association, vol. 1, no. 1 
noticed 383 

BIDWELL genealogy, descendants of John, 
in preparation 191 

BINGHAM, Hon. Harry, memoir, edited by 
H. H. Metcalf noticed 198 

BISHOP genealogy, descendants of John, in 
preparation 191 

BISSELL genealogical records, family of R. I. 
345 

BLANCH ARD, Ralph, administration of es- 
tate 1797 374 

BLAND, ship, passengers for Va. 1775 120 



BODWELL genealogy in preparation 89 

BOND genealogy in preparation 89 

BONNELL, Edwin and T. A. Perkins Cali- 
fornia Society of the Sons of the Ameri- 
can Revolution, constitution, by-laws, 
and members noticed 101 

BOOTH, Henry Slader Booth genealogy no- 
ticed 193 

BOOTH genealogy, by H. S. Booth noticed 
193 

Boston, Mass., cemetery department, annual 
report, 1910-11 noticed 385 

Marston restaurants, history, by G. W. El- 
dridge noticed 102 

record of streets, alleys, places, 1910 noticed 
199 

records from diary of Josiah Williston, 1808- 
14 366 

records of selectmen's meetings 1818-22 no- 
ticed 385 

Bostonian Society, publications, vol. 7 noticed 
306 

Bowdoin College, obituary record of graduates 
and the Medical School of Me., 1908-9 
noticed 385 

BOWLEY, Oglander, administration of estate 
1802 375 

BRADSTREET and variants 
John, will 1678 73 

Bradstreate, John, will 1559 70 

Bradstreete, Humfrey, will 1618 71 
John, will 1610 72 
Robert, will 1663 72 

Bradstret, Robert, will 1553 69 

Bradstrete, Eleanor, will 1557 69 
John, will 1664 73 

Bradstrett, William, will 1627 71 

BRADSTREET, baptisms, marriages, and bur- 
ials, 1559-1625 71 

BRADY family reunion, 1909, by W. G. Mur- 
dock noticed 302 

BRANCH, Simon, will 1614 286 
Susan, will 1619 286 

BRANCH, baptisms, marriages, and burials 
from Eng. parish registers 286 

BRAND, Benjamin, notice 298 

BRAZER genealogy in preparation 191 

BRETT, Catheryna (Rombout), homestead, 
history, by A. C. Sutcliffe noticed 102 

BREWER, David Josiah, memoir noticed 96 

BRIDGES, Robert, memoir, in The three Lynn 
captains, Robert Bridges, Thomas Mar- 
shall, and Richard Walker, read before 
the Lynn Historical Society, Feb. 1910, 
by C. E. Mann noticed 384 

BROMWELL, Henrietta Elizabeth Bromwell 
genealogy, including descendants of Wm. 
Bromwell and Beulah Hall, with data re- 
lating to others of the Bromwell name 
in America noticed 193 

BROMWELL genealogy, by H. E. Bromwell 
noticed 193 

Brooklin, Me., history, in Register of towns of 
Sedgwick, Brooklin &c, by Chatto and 
Turner noticed 386 

Brookline Historical Society, proceedings, 1910 
noticed 97 

BROWN(E), Chaddus, notes 84 
Cyrus Henry Genealogical record of Nathan- 
iel Bftboock, Simeon Main, Isaac Miner, 
Ezekiel Main noticed 302 

BROWN(E) genealogy, descendants of James 
of Middletown Conn. 5 133; with addi- 
tions 84 



Index of Subjects 



BROWN(E) cont'd 

descendants of John of Rehoboth, Mass., 
in preparation 191 

Bunker Hill Monument Association, proceed- 
ings 1910 noticed 200 

BURGESS, Anthony, administration of estate 
1810 378 
Benjamin Franklin, notice xlviii 

Burlington, Mass., old meeting house, 1732, 
historical addresses, by M. E. S. Curtis 
noticed 200 

BURRELL, Dr. Herbert Leslie, notice lvi 

BURRITT genealogy, descendants of Black- 
leach noticed 3b3 

BURT, Jonathan, notice 382 

BUTTS genealogy in preparation 191 

CADY genealogy, descendants of Nicholas, 
by O. P. Allen noticed 90; supplement 
noticed 384 

CALDWELL, Dr. Charles T. William Coald- 
well, Caldwell, or Coldwell. History 
and genealogy of his descendants no- 
ticed 91 

CALDWELL genealogy, descendants of Wm., 
by C. T. Caldwell noticed 91 . 

CALL, Simeon T. Genealogical history of 
the Call family in U. S., also biographi- 
cal sketches of members of the family 
noticed 193 

CALL genealogy, by S. T. Call noticed 193 

Calvert, ship, passengers for Md. 1775 117 

Cambridge, Mass., First Parish church 1837, 
ill. opp. 276 

CARLETON genealogy in preparation 89 

CARPENTER, Robert W. Foxborough, Mass., 
warnings, etc. 39 

Carver, Mass., vital records to 1850 noticed 
203 

CASAVANT genealogy, by G. A. Dejordy 
noticed 302 

CASSON, Herbert A. History of the tele- 
phone noticed 206 

CASTOR genealogy, Holmesburg branch, by 
R. A. Martin noticed 302 

Centerdale, R. I., history, 1636-1909, by F. C- 
Angell noticed 200 

CHADWICK genealogy in preparation 89 

Chalkley, ship, passengers for Philadelphia 
1775 20 

CHAMBERLAIN, George Walter Revolu- 
tionary soldiers of York co., Me. 76 107 
254 333 

CHAMBERLIN, Roswell, administration of 
estate .',7*$ 

CHAMBERS, Robert, administration of estate 
1806 376 

CHAPPELL genealogy in preparation 192 

Charlestown, Mass., town records, by H. H. 
Sprague noticed 98 

CHASE, Ellen The beginnings of the Amer- 
ican Revolution, based on contemporary 
letter*, diaries, and other documents 
noticed 605 

CHASE chronicle, vol. 1, no. 4 noticed 193 

CHATTO and TURNER Register of the 
towns of Sedgwick, Brooklin, Deer Isle, 
Stonington, and Isle au Haut, Me. noticed 
386 

CHECKLEY record, in Some account of 
Capt. John Frazier, by J. G. Leach 
noticed 92 



Chester County, Pa., record of the courts 1681- 
97 noticed 200 

Chester, Mass., vital records to 1850 noticed 
100 

CHEVALIER genealogy in preparation 90 

Chicago, IH-» biography of notable men born 
before 1850 noticed 200 

Chile, conquerors, by T. T. Ojeda, vol. 2 noticed 

305 
CHILTON, Claudius Lysias Centenary sketch 

of William P. Chilton noticed 198 
William Parish, memoir, by C. L. Chilton 

noticed 198 

CHOQUETTE genealogy, by G. A. Dejordy 
noticed 302 

Civil war, see U. S., Civil war 

CLARK, A. Howard National year-book, 
1910 noticed 205 

CLEMENT, Edward Henry Charles Edwin 

Hurd 3 
C LOUGH, George Albert, notice lxv 
Coaldwell, see Caldwell 

COE genealogy, ancestors and descendants of 
Robert, by J. G. Bartlett noticed 384 

COLCORD, Dr. Doane Blood Colcord gene- 
alogy, descendants of Edward of New 
Hampshire, lt)30to 1908 noticed 91 

COLCORD genealogy, descendants of Edward, 
by D. B. Colcord noticed 91 

Coldwell, see Caldwell 

Colonial families of the Southern States of 
America, genealogical history, by S. P. 
Hardy noticed 384 

COLVER, Frederic Lathrop Colver-Culver 
genealogy, descendants of Edward of 
Boston, Dedham, and Roxbury, Mass., 
and New London and Mystic, Conn. 
noticed 302 

COLVER-Culver genealogy, descendants of 
Edward, by F. L. Colver noticed 302 

Connecticut soldiers, bibliography of lists 153 
soldiers, local, bibliography of lists 155 
soldiers in the American Revolution, bibli- 
ography of lists 153 
soldiers in the Civil war, bibliography of 
lists 154 

Connecticut Volunteer Infantry, 7th regiment, 
company K, in the Civil war, history, by 
J. Tourtelotte noticed 101 

Continental Congress, journals, 1774-89, ed. 
from original records in the Library of 
Congress, by G. Hunt, vols. Hi and 17 
noticed 102; vol. 18 noticed 208 

Conveyancing, origin and development of, 
history, by W. T. A. Fitzgerald noticed 
265 

Conway, Mass., historical sketch and the Rice 
family, by E. B. Rice noticed 196 

COOLEY, Benjamin, deposition concerning 
Jonathan Burt of Springfield, Mass., 
1669 382 

COPELAM), Leland Stanford Copeland 
gleanings, 165 l-ly05 noticed 91 

COPELAND genealogy, by L. S. Copeland 
noticed 91 

COREY, Deloraine Pendre, memoir, with au- 
tograph and portrait 103; memoir, by 
C. E. Mann noticed 304 
Simeon, administration of estate 1812 378 

COTTON, Thomas, will 1808 378 

County Pedigrees, vol. 1, parts 2 and 3. Nott- 
inghamshire, vol. 1 noticed 202 



d 



Index of Subjects 



COVELL genealogy, descendants of James, 
in preparation 383 

CRANDALL genealogy in preparation 90 

Culver, see Colver 

CURTIS, Martha E. Sewall Ye olde meeting- 
house. Addresses and verses relating 
to the meeting-house, Burlington, Mass., 
built 1732, and other historical addresses 
noticed 200 

CURTISS genealogy, descendants of Charles, 
in Ancestors and descendants of Capt. 
Benj. Barnes, by A. T. Barnes noticed 
302 

CUTTER, William Richard Memoirs of the 
N. E. Hist. Gen. Society xlvi 



DALE, Dr. William H. Robert Edwards 
Carter Stearns, lS2~-iy09, biographical 
sketch noticed 385 

Dam, see Dame 

DAME genealogy, descendants of John of 
Dover, N. H. 212 310 

DAVIS, Horatio, notice lii 

Dawes, ship, passengers for Jamaica 1775 248 

DAY genealogy in preparation 90 

DEliENHAM genealogy, by VV. D. Sweeting 
noticed 193 

Deer Isle, Me., history, in Register of towns of 
Sedgwick, Brooklin, etc., by Chatto and 
Turner noticed 3fc6 

DEJORDY, L'abbt G. A. Genealogie de la 
famille Adam noticed 302 

Genealogie de la famille Choquette noticed 
302 

Genealogie de la famille Prefontaiue no- 
ticed 303 

Genealogie de la famille Senecal noticed 
303 

Genealogies des families Casavant et Rav- 
enelle-Laliine noticed 302 

Derryfield, N. H., see Manchester 

DEXTER, Franklin Bowditch Biographical 
sketches of the graduates of Yale College 
with annals of the College history, vol. 
5, June, 17y2-Sept., 1»05 noticed 3«5 

Diana, ship, passengers for Md. 1775 21 

DILLINGHAM genealogy, descendants of 
Edward, in preparation 383 

DILLMAN genealogy, in Genealogy of the 
Houser family, by W. VV. Houser and 
others noticed 195 

DOANE, Alfred Alder Harding genealogy 
noticed o03 

DODD, John, administration of estate 1809 
377 

DOLIBER, Ada Ripley, notice xlix 

DORT, Obed, will 1809 377 

DOWNES, William Ephraim Daniel Edward 
Downes of Dorchester, Mass., and de- 
scendants 36 

DOWNES genealogy, descendants of Edward 
of Dorchester, Mass. HO 

DRAKE genealogy, descendants of Francis, 
in preparation 302 

DRURY death book, 1757-1803 356 

DUDLEY, Lucy Bronson A writer's inkhorn 
noticed 386 
Gov. Thomas, parentage, notice 189 

DURRELL, Harold Clarke Outline sketches 
of descendants of Nathaniel Durrell of 
Kingfield, Me. noticed 91 
Reunions of the Durrell family noticed 91 



DURRELL, genealogical notice of the de- 
scendants ot Nathaniel, by H. C. Durrell 
noticed 91 
meetings of family, arranged by H. C Dur- 
rell noticed 91 

DYER, Albion Morris First ownership of 
Ohio lands 51 139 220 
William, ancestry, notice 189 



Earl of Erroll, ship, passengers for Grenades 
1776 251 

East Greenwich, co. Kent, Eng., manor, his- 
torical notice 87 

EASTMAN Charles Rochester Scoville fami- 
ly records noticed 94 

Scoville iamily records, part 2. Descend- 
ants of Arthur Scovil of Boston, Mass., 
Middletown and Lyme, Conn, noticed 
196 

John Robie History of the town of An- 
dover, N. H., 1751-1906 noticed 199 

EATON, Dr. Arthur Wentworth Hamilton 
History of King's County, N. S., 1604- 
1910 noticed 201 

Egolynden, see Iggleden 

ELD RIDGE, Capt. George W. Marston res- 
taurants, history noticed 102 

ELIOT, Samuel Atkins Heralds of a liberal 
faith, Unitariauism, biography noticed 
199 

ELIOT genealogy, descendants of Thomas of 
Renoboth, Mass., ia preparation 192 

Elizabeth, ship, passengers for Philadelphia 
1775 237 

Elizabeth, ship, passengers for St. John's Is- 
land 1775 241 

Elkridge, ship, passengers for Md. 1775 128 

ELY, Daniel Briitain, Reuben Pownall and 
Warren Smedley An historical narra- 
tive of the Ely, Revell^and Stacye fami- 
lies, founders of Trenton and Burlington, 
West Jersey, 1078-83, with genealogy of 
Ely descendants in America noticed 193 

ELY genealogy, by R. P., W. S., and D. B. Ely 
noticed 193 

EMERSON, Rev. Joseph, diary, 1748-9, with 
notes, by S. A. Green noticed 304 

England, emigrants from, 1775 20 116 
emigrants from, 1775-6 232 
genealogical research in 63 174 284 314 
taxation in, history, by S. A. Morgan no- 
ticed 305 

ENSIGN, Charles Sidney William Carver 
Bates 307 

Eugenics and genealogy, notice 299 

FAIRCLOUGH, genealogical memoir, family 
of Fairclough Hall, Weston, Eng. no- 
ticed 200 

Fanny and Janny, ship, passengers for Md. 

1775 33 
Favourite, ship, passengers for N. Y. 1775 232 

FELTON, Daniel Henry The first house on 
Feltou Hill with 14th annual report of 
the i'eabody Historical Society 1900-10 
noticed 303 

FELTON houses, historical account, by D. H. 
Felton, in The first house on Felton Hill 
with the 14th annual report of the Pea- 
body Historical Society, 1909-10 noticed 
303 

FIFIELD records 382 

FILLMORE, Millard, ancestry, English, notice 

87 



Index of Subjects 



Fishkill, N. Y., Brett homestead, history, by 
A. C. Sutcliffe noticed 102 

FITZGERALD, William Thomas Aloysius 
Short history of the origin and develop- 
ment of conveyancing 265 

Fleetwood, ship, passengers for Md. 1775 121 

FLOOD, Daniel, administration of estate 1811 
377 

FORBES, Susan Elizabeth Parsons (Brown), 
notice liv 

Fort Jefferson, and its commander, 1861-2, his- 
tory, by J. H. Shinn noticed 201 

Fortune, ship, passengers for Carolina 1775 
247 

Fortune, ship, passengers for Md. 1775 238 

FOTUERG1LL, Gerald Emigrants from 
England 20 110 23* 

Foxborough, Mass., vital records to 1850 no- 
ticed 100 
warnings, 1777-96 39 

Framingham, Mass., vital records to 1850, by 
T. W. Baldwin noticed 203 

FRAZIER genealogy, descendants of Capt. 
John, by J. G. Leach noticed 92 

FRENCH, Charles Newton Aaron French 
and his descendants noticed 194 
Elizabeth Genealogical research in England 
03 174 284 314 
List of emigrants to America from Liver- 
pool 16V7-1707 43 165 
William, English ancestry, records concern- 
ing 2&4 

FRENCH genealogy, by C. N. French noticed 
194 

FULHAM, Volney Sewall Fulham genealogy 
noticed 194 

FULHAM genealogy, by V. S. Fulham noticed 
194 

FULLEK, Melville Weston notice Ix 

William Hyslop Genealogy oi descendants 
of ;>amuel Fuller of the Mayflower no- 
ticed 92 

FULLER genealogy, descendants of Samuel 
of the Mayflower and supplement to gen- 
ealogy ot descendants oi Edward of the 
Mayflower, by W. H. Fuller noticed 92 



GAGE genealogy, descendants of John, in 
preparation 90 

GALL A WAY", Irene Dabney Matthew Calla- 
way and descendants noticed 92 
Martin family. Descendants of Thos. Mar- 
tin of Va. noticed 93 

GALLA WAY, genealogy, descendants of Mat- 
thew, by 1. D. Galiaway noticed 92 

Gallipolis, Ohio, French inhabitants 1795, list 
2:j0 
survey of land, letter concerning 1796 229 

GARDNER genealogical records, family of 
R. 1. and Vt. 347 

GARGAN, Thomas J., memoir, by J.Smith 
noticed 198 

Genealogy and eugenics, notice 299 

Georgia Packet, ship, passengers for Ga. 1775 
243 

GIBBS, John, notice 299 

GIBSON, Christopher, will 1675 63 

GIFFORD, John, record of family 65 

GOSS, John, administration of estate 1808 
377 



GRAZEBROOK, George Pedigree of the fam- 
ily of Grazebrook, pt. 1, from 1035 until 
the representation in direct male line be- 
came vested in that branch which settled 
in Shenston, co. Stafford, Eng., in 1204 
noticed 194 
Margaret, note 299 

GRAZEBROOK genealogy, by G. Grazebrook 
noticed 194 

GREEN, Charles Ransley Family history 
and genealogy of the Dryden Barbour 
family, Traer, Iowa noticed 302 
Dr. Samuel Abbott Diary kept by the Rev. 
Joseph Emerson of Pepperell, Mass., 
Aug. 1, 1748-April 9, 1749, with notes and 
introduction noticed 304 
Piracy off the Florida coast and elsewhere 
noticed 306 

Greenland, N. H., records of marriages 1710-34 

351 
GREENWOOD genealogy, descendants of 

Thos., in preparation 90 

Grenville Bay, ship, passengers for Grenada 
1775 249 

GREW, Henry Sturgis, notice 1 

Groton, Mass., Community, history, by E. A. 
Richardson noticed 305 



HACKETT, Frank Warren Reminiscences 
of the Geneva tribunal of arbitration 1872. 
The Alabama claims noticed 304 

Haines, see Haynes 

HALE, Robert Bowdoin College studies in 
history. No. 1. Early days of church and 
state in Maine noticed 305 

HALLEY extracts from British archives, by 
E. F. Mc Pike, 3d series noticed 92 

HAMLIN, Mrs. Frances Bacon Genealogy 
and descendants of Rev. David Ward 
noticed 95 

Hanson, Mass., vital records to 1850 noticed 
100 

HARDING genealogy, descendants of Mar- 
tini, by A. A. Doane noticed 303 

HARDY, Stella Pickett Colonial families of 
the Southern States of America noticed 
384 

HARRIS, Joseph S. Collateral ancestry of 
Stephen Harris born 1798, and Marianne 
Smith born 1805 noticed 92 
Stephen, ancestry, by J. S. Harris noticed 
92 

HARRISON, Burton Norvell, memoir, in 
Aris Sonis Focisque, being a memoir of 
an American family, by F. and F. B. 
Harrison noticed 194 
Fairfax and Francis Burton Aris Sonis 
Focisque, being a memoir of an Ameri- 
can family, the Harrisons of Skimino, 
and particularly of Jesse Burton Harri- 
son and Burton Norvell Harrison no- 
ticed 194 
Jesse Burton, memoir, in Aris Sonis Focis- 
que, being a memoir of an American 
family, by F. and F. B. Harrison noticed 
194 

Hartford, Conn., directory, 1799, by F. D. 
Andrews noticed 98 
State library and Supreme Court building, 
cornerstone laid May 25, 1909 noticed 98 

Hart's Location, N. H., history and vital rec- 
ords, 1877-1911, in First report of Hart's 
Location, 1911 noticed 385 

Harvard University, bells, history 275 
catalogue, quinquennial, 1636-1910 noticed 
100 



/ 



Index of Subjects 



Harvard University cont'd 
class of 1870, report of secretary, no. 9, 1910 

noticed 304 
class of 1885, 25th anniversary, secretary's 

report no. 7 noticed 204 
Harvard Hall, 1798, ill. opp. 280; 1911, ill. 

284 
Law Quinquennial, catalogue of the Law 

School of Harvard University, 1817-1909 

noticed 385 
Law School Association, 6th celebration and 

dinner, Harvard Union, Juneii8, 1910 no- 
ticed 386 
Massachusetts Hall, 1798, ill. opp. 278; 1911, 

ill. opp. 282 
prospect of the colleges in Cambridge in 

New England, 1726, ill. opp. 275 

HARWOOD, Herbert Joseph, notice liii 
Joseph Alfred Records of Littleton, Mass., 
births and deaths from the earliest rec- 
ords begun 1715 noticed 99 

HASELTINE genealogy in preparation 90 

HASKINS, Daniel Waldo, notice lv 

Hatfield, Mass., history, 1660-1910, by D. W. 
and R. F. Wells noticed 98 

Haverhill, Mass., vital records to 1850, vol. 2 
noticed 100 

Haverhill, N. H., history, by W. F. Whitcher 
noticed 98 

HA WES, Clara SiJces Records from the Bible 
of Jonathan Wilson of Thompson, Conn. 
349 

Edmund, ancestry, English 160 

Frank Mortimer Abstracts from vol. 1 of 

the probate records of Orleans co., Vt. 

374 
James W. English ancestors of Edmund 

Hawes of Yarmouth, Mass. 160 

HAWES genealogy, descendants of Thomas 
162 

Hawk, ship, passengers for Philadelphia 1775 
241 

HAWLEY extracts from British archives, by 
E. F. McPike, 3d series noticed 92 

HAYNES and variant 
Sufferana, items 295 

Haines, John, administration of estate 1814 
379 

HAYWARD genealogy, by E. H. Barney no- 
ticed 194 

HAZARD, Blanche Evans Beaumarchais and 
the American Revolution noticed 305 

Hector, ship, passengers for Jamaica 1775 20 

HENDRICK genealogy in preparation 192 

Henkle, see Hinckley 

HILL, Edwin Allston James Brown of Mid- 
dletown, Conn. 6 133 

HILLS, Thomas, notice lxi 

HINCKLEY and variants 
Isaac, administration of estate 1636 289 
James, will 1681 289 

Henkle, Robert, will 1523 277 

Hinckle, Stephen, will 1630 288 

HiNCKLY, Thomas, will 1635 289 

Hinkley, George, will 1662 289 

Hynckley, Robert, will 1607 288 

Hynckleye, John, will 1577 287 

HINCKLEY, baptisms, marriages, and bur- 
ials from English parish registers 314 
pedigree, family of Lenham, Eng. 316 

HITCHCOCK, David, will 1811 379 

HODGES, Almon Danforth, memoir with 
portrait and autograph 207 
John, notice 298 



Holland Land Company and canal construc- 
tion in western New York, history, in 
Buffalo Historical Society publications, 
vol. 14, ed. by F. H. Severance noticed 
199 

HOLWORTHY, Sir Matthew and Lady, mem- 
oir, by Albert Matthews noticed 304 

HOOVER genealogy, in Genealogy of the Hou- 
ser family, by W. W. Houser and others 
noticed 195 

Hopewell, N. J., epitaphs, by F.D.Andrews 
noticed 305 

Hopewell, ship, passengers for Md. 1775 30 
HORTON, Byron Barnes Horton family year- 
book, 1911, descendants of Isaac noticed 
384 

HORTON Family year-book, 1911, descendants 
of Isaac, by B. B. Horton noticed 384 

HOUSER, Dr. William Wesley and others 
Genealogy of the Houser, Rhorer, Dill- 
man, Hoover families noticed 195 

HOUSER genealogy, by W. W. Houser and 

others noticed 195 

HOWARD, Bronson, 1842-1908, memoir no- 
ticed 96 
Jotham, administration of estate 1808 377 
HOWE, Edward, wife, notes 295 

Huguenot Society of South Carolina, transac- 
tions, no. 17 noticed 203 

HUIDEKOPER, Frederic Louis In memo- 
riam Frederic Wolters Huidekoper. Me- 
morial papers of the Society of Colonial 
Wars in the District of Columbia, Nov. 
6, 1910 noticed 198 
Frederic Wolters, memoir, in Memorial pa- 
pers of the Society of Colonial Wars in 
the District of Columbia Nov. 6, 1910, by 
F. L. Huidekoper noticed 198 

Hull, Mass., vital records to 1850, by T. W. 
Baldwin noticed 204 

HUMFREY, John, autographs and parentage 
86 

HUNNEWELL, James Frothingham memoir, 
by H. Murdock lxiii; noticed 384 

HUNT, Gaillard Library of Congress. Jour- 
nals of the Continental Congress, 1774-89 
noticed 206 

HUNTTING, Teunis D. Descendants of Ab- 
raham Huntting noticed 93 

HUNTTING genealogy, descendants of Abra- 
ham, by T. D. Huntting noticed 93 

HURD, Charles Edwin, notice with portrait 
and autograph 3 

HUSSEY genealogy, descendants of Richard, 
in preparation 302 

HUTCHINSON, Anne, memorial, note 299 

HYATT, Alpheus, memoir, by A. G. Mayer 
noticed 304 

Hyde Park Historical Record, vol. 7, ed. by 
W. A. Mo wry noticed 201 

Hynckley, see Hinckley 

Hynckleye, see Hinckley 



IGGLEDEN and variants 
John, will 1550 179 
John, will 1614 181 
Stephen, record of family 186 
Stephen, will 1606 181 
Stephen, will 16^4 182 

Egolynden, John, will 1512 177 

Iggulden, John, will 1614 181 

Igleden, Joseph, will 1563 179 
Thomas, will 1563 176 



Index of Subjects 



9 



IGGLEDEN cont'd 

Igolynden, Agnes, will 1477 175 
Alicia, will 1475 174 
Joan, will 1511 176 
Thomas, will 1526 176 
William, will 1474 175 

IGULDEN, Elizabeth, will 1563 179 
Joan, will 1518 178 
Richard, will 1518 177 
William, will 1557 180 

Igylnden, Thomas, will 1500 175 

IGGLEDEN, baptisms, marriages, and burials 
from English parish registers 183 

Ipswich, Mass., vital records to 1850, vols. 1 
and 2 noticed 100 

Isle au Haut, Me., history, in Register of 
towns of Sedgwick, Brooklin, etc., by 
Chatto and Turner noticed 386 



JACKSON, Stonewall, see Thomas Jonathan 
Thomas Jonathan, campaigns and battles of 

1861-5, history, by J. H. Wood noticed 

101 

Jane, ship, passengers for Md. 1775 22 

JENNINGS family pedigree in preparation 383 

Jenny, ship, passengers for Fort Cumberland 
1775 123 

Jew, justice to the, history, by M. C. Peters 
noticed 102 

JEWETT family of America, year-book of 

1911 noticed 384 

JOHNSON, Caleb, administration of estate 
1807 376 
Dr. Frederick Charles Rev. Jacob Johnson, 
M. A., pioneer preacher of Wyoming 
Valley (Wilkesbarre, Fa.), 1772-90 no- 
ticed 304 
Rev. Jacob, memoir, by F. C. Johnson no- 
ticed 304 

Judith and Hilaria, ship, passengers for Ja- 
maica 1776 250 

KEACH, Mary Alice, notice lx 

KEARSLEY genealogy, descendants of Jon- 
athan, by E. L. YYhite noticed 195 

KELLOGG, Dr. David Sherwood, notice lxv 

KELSO genealogy in preparation 89 

Kent Register series, note 89 

KIDDER fund, report of trustees for 1910 
xxxviii 

KING, Daniel, notes 84 
Dr. George Farquhar Jones, notice Ir 

KING genealogy, descendants of Asa of Mans- 
field, Conn., in preparation 192 

KINGMAN, Leroy Wilson Genealogy of the 
Kingman and Ordronaux families no- 
ticed 384 

KINGMAN genealogy, descendants of Henry 
of Weymouth, Mass., by L. W. Kingman 
noticed 384 

King's County, N. S., history, 1604-1910, by A. 
W . H. Eaton noticed 201 

KIRBYE, John, notice 298 

Knap, Dorothy, marriage, notice 382 



LAB AW, Rev. George Warne Genealogy of 
the Warne family in America, descend- 
ants of Thomas noticed 303 

Lady's Adventure, ship, passengers for Ja- 
maica 1776 250 

Lamb of Liverpool, ship, passengers for Amer- 
ica 1700 44 



LAMUNYON genealogy in preparation 192 

LAWRENCE, John Strachan Descendants 
of Moses and Sarah Kilham Porter of 
Pawlet, Vt. noticed 303 

LEACH, Josiah Granville Some account of 
Capt. John Frazier and descendants 
with notes on the West and Checkley 
families noticed 92 

LEAVITT, Emily Wilder Starkeys of New 
Eng. and allied families noticed 95 

LEE family in England, note 299 

LENARTH, Peter, notice 298 

Leominster, Mass., vital records to 1850 no- 
ticed 204 

LEVERETT, Gov. John, knighthood, notes 

85 

LEWIS, Frances Amelia (Smith), ancestry of, 
by H. S. L. Barnes noticed 95 
Henry Martyn, ancestry of, by H. S. L. 
Barnes noticed 93 

Liberty, ship, passengers for Md. 1775 30 

LINCOLN, Charles Henry Manuscript col- 
lections of the American Antiquarian 
Society noticed 386 
Charles Plimpton Extracts from the diary 
of Josiah Williston of Boston 1808-14 
306 

LINCOLN genealogy, descendants of Samuel 
of Hingham, Mass., in preparation 383 
descendants of Thomas of Taunton, Mass., 
in preparation 383 

LINDSAY Family Association of America, 
report for 1910 noticed 303 

Littleton, Mass., births, marriages, and deaths, 
1715 to 1850, by J. A. Harwood noticed 
99 

LIVERMORE, Thomas L. Numbers and 
losses in the Civil war in America, 
1861-5 noticed 205 

Liverpool, Eng., emigrants from, 1697-1707 
43 165 

London, ship, passengers for Tobago 1775 25 

LOOMIS, Elias and Elisha Scott Descend- 
ants of Joseph Loomis in America 
noticed 93 

LOOMIS genealogy, descendants of Joseph, 
by E. and E. S. Loomis noticed 93 

LOVERING genealogy in preparation 90 

LUM genealogy in preparation 90 

Lydia, ship, passengers for Philadelphia 1775 
35 



McCRILLIS genealogy in preparation 192 

McFARLAND, Daniel Y. Genealogy of 
McFarland family of Hancock co., Me. 
noticed 93 

McFARLAND genealogy, by D. Y. McFar- 
land noticed 93 

McPIKE, Eugene Fairfield Extracts from 
British archives on families of Halley, 
Hawley, Parry, Pyke, etc., 3d series no- 
ticed 92 

Magazine of History, with notes and queries, 
extra no. 11 noticed ,97; 12 noticed 
203; 14 noticed 305 

MAIN genealogy, in Genealogical record of 
Nathaniel Babcock, by C. 11. Brown no- 
ticed 302 

Maine, church and state, history, early, by 
R. Hale noticed 305 

Maiden Historical Society, register no. 1, 
1910-11 noticed 306 



h 



Index of Subjects 



Manchester, N. H., town records, 1817-28, vol. 
4, in Manchester Historic Association 
Collections, vol. 11, ed. by G. W. Browne 

town records, 1829-35, vol. 5, in Manchester 
Historic Association Collections, vol. 12, 
ed. by G. VV. Browne noticed 386 
MANN, Charles Edward Deloraine Pendre 
COrey 103; memoir noticed 304 

The old Jonathan Bacon farm, Walnut 
Hill, Natick, Mass. noticed 303 

The three Lynn captains, Kobt. Bridges, 
Thos. Marshal!, and Richard Walker, 
memoirs noticed 384 

Manson, see Mouson 

Marietta, Ohio, St. Luke's church, history, 
supplement, by Wilson Waters noticed 
305 

Marlborough, ship, passengers for Savannah, 
Ga. 1775 242 

Marret, John, administration of estate 1803 
375 

MARSH, Carmi Lathrop and R. O. Sturte- 
vant History of the 13th regiment, 
Vermont volunteers, war of 1861-5 no- 
ticed 101 

MARSHALL, Thomas, memoir, in The three 
Lynn captains, Robert Bridges, Thomas 
Marshall, and Richard Walker, read be- 
fore the Lynn Historical Society Feb. 
1910, by C. E. Mann noticed 384 

MARSTON restaurants, Boston, Mass., his- 
tory, by G. W. Eldridge noticed 102 

MARTIN, Richard Allen Castor family, 
Holmesburg branch noticed 302 

MARTIN genealogy, descendants of Thos., by 
I. D. Gallaway noticed 93 

MARVIN, William Theophilus Rogers Al- 
mou Danforth Hodges, Jr. 207 

Mary, ship, passengers for Md. 1775 238 

Mary, ship, passengers for Va. 1775 26 

Maryl Planter, ship, passengers for Md. 1775 
26 

Massachusetts Bay, Province of, acts and re- 
solves, vol. xvii, being vol. xii of the 
appendix, 1761-4 noticed 385 

Massachusetts,* acts and resolves, passed by 
the General Court in 1910, together witli 
the Constitution, messages of the Govern- 
or, list of Civil Government, tables show- 
ing changes in the statutes, changes of 
names of persons, etc. noticed 206 

agriculture, sketch, in Golden New England, 
by S. Baxter noticed 200 

census, H)05, vol. 2 noticed 206 

public records, laws and commission of, by 
H. E. Woods noticed 206 

record commissioner, report 1910, by H. E. 
Woods noticed 306 

single tax, taxation of land values, by J. 31. 
Miles noticed 305 

soldiers, local, bibliography of lists 11 

Massachusetts, Colonial Society of, publica- 
tions, vol. 12 noticed 306 

Massachusetts, Volunteer Infantry, 1st regi- 
ment, lb61-4, memorial service, Boston, 
May 21, 1911 noticed 385' 

MATTH E WS, Albert Sir Matthew and Lady 
Hoi worthy noticed 304 

MAYER, Dr. Alfred Goldsborough Alexan- 
der A^assiz, 1835-1910 noticed 303 
Alpheus Hyatt, 1838-1902 noticed 304 

MEADE, Richard, note 293 

Melvin Memorial, Sleepy Hollow Cemetery, 
Concord, 31 ass., exercises at dedication, 
June 16, 1909, ed. by A. S. Roe noticed 
198 



Mermaid, ship, passengers for Md. 1775 130 

MERRITT, Douglas Sutherland records no- 
ticed 95 

METCALF, Henry Harrison Memorial of 
Hon. Harry Bingham, lawyer, legisla- 
tor, author noticed 198 

3IILES, Jonas Michael Taxation of land val- 
ues in 3Iassachusetts noticed 305 

MILES genealogy in preparation 192 302 

311 LLS genealogy, descendants of Samuel of 
Dedham, 31ass., in preparation 192 

3Iilton, 31as8., history, text book noticed 202 

3Iinute men of 1861, Mass. regiments, history 
and complete roster, with photographs 
and biographical sketches, by G. W. Na- 
son noticed 205 

MIXER, Isaac, notice 380 

3IONNET genealogy in preparation 89 

Blonson, see 31unson 

Montreal, ship, passengers for 31ontreal 1775 
116 

3IOORS, Joseph Benjamin, notice xlvi 

3Iordaunt's Record, vol. 2, nos. 1 and 2 noticed 
202 

3IORE Historical Journal, nos. 15 and 16 no- 
ticed 94; 17 noticed 384 

MORGAN, Dr. Gad, administration of estate 
1812 379 
Shepard Ashman Williams College. David 
A. Wells prize essays. Number 2. His- 
tory of Parliamentary taxation in Eng- 
land noticed 305 

3IORLEY, Herbert Small Some descendants 
of Thomas 3Iorley 371 

3IORLEY genealogy, descendants of Thomas 
371 

3Iorrisania, N. Y., St. Ann's church, histor- 
ical account noticed 388 

310RSE genealogy, descendants of Samuel of 
Worthington, 3Iass., by H. M. Weeks 
noticed 195 

3IUNSON and variant 
Myron Andrews Portsmouth race of 3Ion- 
sons, 3Iunsons, 31ansons, comprising 
Richard 3Ionson and his descendants 
noticed 195 

Munson genealogy, descendants of Robert, in 
preparation 302 

3Io^son genealogy, descendants of Richard 
of Portsmouth, N. H., by 31. A. 3Iunson 
noticed 195 

3IURDOCK, Harold 3Iemorial of James 
Frothingham Hunnewell, read before 
the Bostonian Society Jan. 1911, no- 
ticed 384 
William G. Brady family reunion and frag- 
ments of Brady history aud biography 
noticed 302 

3IUSKETT, Dr. Joseph James notice lxvi 

3IYERS genealogical items 348 



Nancy, ship, passengers for Baltimore 1775 
235 

Nancy, ship, passengers for Md. 1775 25 121 

NASON, George W. History and complete 
roster of Mass. regiments, 3Iinutemen of 
'61 noticed 205 

Natick, Mass., Jonathan Bacon farm, sketch, 
by C E. 3Iann noticed 303 
record of deaths in Drury death book, 1757- 
1803 356 



Index of Subjects 



National Society of Daughters of Founders 
and Patriots of America, history for the 
10th year ending May 13, 1908 noticed 
386; 11th year ending May 13, 1909 no- 
ticed 386 ; 12th year ending May 13, 1910 
noticed 386 

NEALE, Walter, notice 299 

Nebraska, history, outline, by A. Watkins no- 
ticed 305 

Nelly Frigate, ship, passengers for Md. 1775 33 

Neptune, ship, passengers for Md. 1775 119 

New England, dwelling house, development 
of, history, paper read before the Lynn 
Historical Society, Mar. 10, 1910, by H. 
B. Worth noticed 385 
fruit production, sketch, by S. Baxter no- 
ticed 200 
soldiers, bibliography of lists 151; by M. E. 
Baker noticed 305 

New England Historic Genealogical Society, 
address 1911, by J. P. Baxter ix 

charter and enabling acts lxix 

Committee on Collection of records, report 
for 1910 xxiii 

Committee on the Consolidated Index, re- 
port for 1910 xxiv 

Committee on English Research, report for 
1910 xx 

Committee on Epitaphs, report for 1910 
xxii 

Committee on Finance, report for 1910 xvii 

Committee on Heraldry, report for 1910 
xxii 

Committee to assist the Historian, report 
for 1910 xix 

Committee on Increase of Membership, re- 
port for 1910 xxiv 

Committee on the Library, report for 1910 
xvii 

Committee on Papers and Essays, report for 

1910 xviii 

Committee on Publications, report for 1910 
xviii 

Committee on the Sale of Publications, re- 
port for 1910 xxiv 

Corresponding Secretary, report for 1910 
xxxvi 

Council, report for 1910 xv 

financial needs lxx 

Historian, report for 1910 xliv 

Librarian, report for 1910 xxv 

library, donors, 1910 xxx 

memoirs xlvi 

necrology 1910 xliv 

officers and committees for 1911 v vi 

proceedings 1910 83; 1910 and 1911 188; 

1911 xiii 292 

Treasurer, report for 1910 xxxix 

New England Society in the City of Brooktyn, 
N. Y., report 1910 205 

New England Society in the City of New 
York, 105th anniversary celebration, 
1910 noticed 306 

New York, Province of, minutes of the execu- 
tive council. Administration of Francis 
Lovelace, 1668-73, vol. 1. Collateral and 
illustrative documents 1-29 noticed 202 

New York, Province of, minutes of the execu- 
tive council. Administration of Francis 
Lovelace, 1658-73, vol 2. Collateral and 
illustrative documents 20-48 noticed 305 

New York, conspiracies, minutes of the com- 
missioners for detecting and defeating, 
1778-81, vol. 3 noticed 202 

northern, genealogy of prominent men no- 
ticed 202 

State library, fire, 1911 300 

New York City, N. Y., Public library, genealo- 
gies and local histories, British, list no- 
ticed 303 



NEW BOLD genealogy in preparation 90 

Newbury, Mass., vital records to 1850, vols. 1 
and 2 noticed 100 

Newburyport, Mass., vital records to 1850, 
vol. 1 noticed 100 

Newcastle-upon-Tyne, Eng., public libraries, 
catalogue of books and tracts on geneal- 
ogy and heraldry noticed 2C6 

NICHOLS, Dr. Arthur Howard Bells of 
Harvard College 275 

NICKEKSON, Sereno D wight, notice xlviii 

Norfolk, Conn., baptisms, marriages, and buri- 
als, 1761-1813 noticed 202 

Norfolk, ship, passengers for Jamaica 1775 28 

NORMAN, William, notice 85 

Nottinghamshire, Eng., pedigrees, vol. 1, in 
County pedigrees noticed 202 

Nova Scotian Institute of Science, proceedings 
and transactions, vol. 12, pt. 2 noticed 
201 



Ohio lands, first ownership, history 51 1.39 220 

Ohio Society of New York, 17th ed. 1911 no- 
ticed 386 

OJEDA, Tomas Thayer Los Conquistadores 
de Chile, vol. 2 noticed 305 

Old Dartmouth (Mass.), surveys, field notes of 
B. Crane, B. Hammond, and b. Smith 
noticed 385 

Old Dartmouth (Mass.) Historical Sketches, 
nos. 24-28 noticed 200 

Old Settler and Historical Association of Lake 
County, Indiana, report of historical 
secretary 1906-10 noticed 201 

Olive Branch, ship, passengers for Md. 1775 
33 

Oneida Historical Society, year-book 1910 no- 
ticed 203 

ORDRONAUX genealogy, descendants of 
Capt. John, in Kingman and Ordronaux 
families, by L. W. Kingman noticed 
384 

Orleans County, Vt., probate records, 1797- 
1814 374 



Packet, ship, passengers for Philadelphia 1775 
110 

PAGE, Samuel, notice of family of So. Caro- 
lina, Groton, and Lunenburg, Mass. 297 

PAINE and variant 
Moses, English ancestry, records concerning 

290 
Thomas, centennial celebration at New Ro- 
chelle, M. Y., June 5, 1909 noticed 304 
memoir, by A. O. Sherman noticed 304 
monument to, re-dedication and assign- 
ment of its custody to New Rochelle, 
N. Y., Oct. 14, 1905, addresses noticed 
304 

Paine, baptisms, marriages, and burials from 
Eng. parish registers 290 

Paynk genealogy, descendants of Stephen of 
Andover, Conn., in preparation 192 

PAINTER, Thomas, autobiography of noticed 
94 

PALMES, Edward, bible record 379 

PARKE genealogy, descendants of Arthur of 
Pa., in preparation 192 

PARRY extracts from British archives, by 
E. F. Mc Pike, 3d series noticed 92 

Patowmack, ship, passengers for Md. 1775 
132 



Index of Subjects 



Payne, see Paine 

PEARSON, Henry, notice 298 

PEARSON genealogy, descendants of John, 
in preparation 90 

Pembroke, Mass., vital records to 1850 noticed 
100 

PENCE genealogy in preparation 192 

PERKINS, Thomas A. and E. Bonnell Cali- 
fornia Society of the Sous of the Amer- 
ican Revolution, constitution, by-laws, 
aud members noticed 101 

PERRIN(E), Rowland Delano Daniel Perrin 
and descendants, 1605-1910 noticed 94 

PERRIN(E) genealogy, descendants of Dan- 
iel, by H. D. Perrine noticed 94 

PETERS, Madison C. Justice to the Jew no- 
ticed 102 

PHIPS, John, administration of estate 1808 

Pirates, off the Florida coast and elsewhere, 
history, by S. A. Green noticed 306 

POOLE, Murray Edward Williams geneal- 
ogy, Wethersneld, Cromwell branch no- 
ticed 96 

POPE, Charles Henry Prouty (Proute) gene- 
alogy noticed 195 

PORTER, Peter, administration of estate 1799 

PORTER genealogy, descendants of Moses 
and oarah Kilham Porter of Pawlet, 
Vt., by J. S. Lawrence noticed 303 

Pownal, Vt., records in copy-bouk of Jacob 
Snernnm 343 

PREFONTAlNE genealogy, by G. A. De- 
jordy noticed 3u3 

PRENTISS, Marion Louise (Howard;, notice 

xlix 

PRESTON, Dorothy, marriage, notice 382 
William Gibbous, notice lvi 

Proute, see Prouty 

PROUTY genealogy, by C. H. Pope noticed 
195 

Providence, R. I., records, vol. 20 noticed 99 

PUTNAM, Rums, letter concerning tract of 
land at (jiallipolis, Ohio 1796 229 

PYKE extracts from British archives, by 
E. F. McPike, 3d 6eries noticed 92 



QUINBY, Rev. Silas E. Record of line of 
descent from Robt. Quiuby of Ames- 
bury, Mass. to Benj. of Unity, N. H. 
and record of Benjamin's descendants 
noticed 94 

QUINBY genealogy, by S. E. Quiuby noticed 
94 



Rachael, ship, passengers for Md. 1775 243 

RANDALL, Margery, marriage, notice 85 

RAVENELLE-Lalime genealogy, in Geneal- 
ogies des families Casavaut, by G. A. 
Dejordy noticed 302 

RAYMOND, Freeborn Fairfield, notice lii 

READE, record, no. 3 noticed 303 

REED, Jusiah, administration of estate 1804 
376 

REVELL, historical narrative, in An histori- 
cal narrative of the Ely, Revell, and 
Stacye families, by R. P., W. S., and 
D. B. Ely noticed 193 

Rhode Island soldiers, bibliography of lists 
151 
soldiers, local, bibliography of lists 152 



Rhode Island cont'd 

soldiers in the American Revolution, bibli- 
ography of lists 151 

soldiers in the Civil war, bibliography of 
lists 151 

RHORER genealogy, in Genealogy of the 
Houser family, by W. W. Houser and 
others noticed 195 

RICE, Rev. Edwin B. Conway, Mass., and 
Rice family noticed 196 
Descendants of Benjamin Rice of Conway, 
Mass. noticed 195 

RICE genealogy, descendants of Benjamin of 

Conway, Mass., by E. B. Rice noticed 

195 
descendants of Cyrus of Conway, Mass., 

in Conway, Mass., and the Rice family, 

by E. B. Rice noticed 196 
descendants of Jonas of Conway, Mass., 

in Conway, Mass., and the Rice family, 

by E. B. Rice noticed 196 
descendants of Timothy of Conway, Mass., 

in Conway, Mass., and the Rice family, 

by E. B. Rice noticed 196 

RICHARDSON, Edward Adams The Com- 
munity, Grotoii, Mass., the story of a 
neighborhood noticed 305 

Richmond, ship, passengers for Jamaica 1775 
246 

RIDER genealogy, descendants of Samuel, in 
preparation 192 

RITTER genealogy, descendants of Daniel, 
by E. S. Stearns noticed 384 

Robert and Elizabeth, ship, passengers for Va. 
1700 43 

ROBIE, notice of family 293 

ROSS genealogy, descendants of James, in 
preparation 192 

ROUSMANIERE, Mary Ayer James Bourne 
Ayer, M.D., notice 252 

Roxbury, Mass., Latin school, quinquennial 
catalogue, 1910-11 noticed 204 

Royal Charlotte, ship, passengers for Md. 1775 
119 

Royal Society of Canada, proceedings and 
transactions, 3d series, vol. 2, pt. 2 and 
vol. 3 noticed 97 

RUGG genealogy in preparation 90 

RUSSELL, Dr. Gurdon Wadsworth Account 
of descendants of John Russell and al- 
lied families of Wadsworth, Tuttle, and 
Beresford, ed. by E. S. Welles noticed 
303 

RUSSELL genealogy, descendants of John of 
Boston, Mass., by G. W. Russell, ed. by 
E. S. Welles noticed 303 



Sacrament certificate, 1673, history, in The 
publications of the Colonial Society of 
x\lassachusetts, vol. xiii noticed 306 

SALE, Amy, will 1609 68 
James, will 1009 67 
John, will 1578 63 

SALE genealogy, descendants of John 63 
wills and records in Eug. 63 

SALISBURY, John, notice of family 379 

Sally, ship, passengers for Philadelphia 1775 
32 

Sampson, ship, passengers for Philadelphia 
1775 242 

SANFORD, Carlton Elisha Thomas Sanford, 
ancestry, life, and descendants noticed 
303 

SANFORD genealogy, descendants of Thom- 
as, by C. E. Sanford noticed 303 



Index of Subjects 



k 



SCALES, John Some descendants of Deacon 
John Dam of Dover, N. H., 1633 212 
310 

SCAMMON, Humphrey, notice 293 

SCHOFF, Wilfred Harvey Descendants ef 
Jacob Schoff, who came to Boston in 
1752, and settled in Ashburnham in 1757, 
with an account of the German immi- 
gration into colonial New England no- 
ticed 196 

SCHOFF, genealogy, descendants of Jacob, 
by W. H. Schoff noticed 196 

SCOVILLE genealogy, descendants of Arthur, 
by C. R. Eastman pt. 1 noticed 94; pt. 
2 noticed 196 

SEALIS baptisms, marriages, and burials 
from English parish registers 319 
pedigree, family of Biddenden, Eng. 321 

Sedgwick, Me., register, 1910, by Chatto and 
Turner noticed 386 

SENECAL genealogy, by G. A. Dejordy no- 
ticed 303 

SEWALL, Henry, note 299 

SHEPPARD, Aaron, administration of es- 
tate 1811 379 
Ashbel, administration of estate 1808 376 
Mary, will 1809 377 

Sherborn, Mass., vital records to 1850, by T. 
W. Baldwin noticed 204 

SHERMAN, A. Outram Thomas Paine, the 
patriot, an address, delivered before the 
Huguenot Society of New Rochelle, 
N. Y., at the opening of the Paine 
House, July 14, 1910 noticed 304 
Jacob, copy-book with genealogical notes 
343 

SHERMAN genealogical records, family of 
No. Kingston, R. I. and Pownal, Vt. 
343 346 

SHERRILL, Charles Hitchcock" Yale college, 
Yale university, class of '89 vicennial 
noticed 385 

SHINN, Josiah H. Fort Jefferson and its 
commander, 1861-2 noticed 201 

Shipwright, ship, passengers for Md. 1775 31 

SHUMWAY, Abijah, will 1809 377 

SILLOWAY, Rev. Thomas William, notice 

liv 

Skowhegan (Old Canaan), Me., history, in the 
Revolution, by L. C. Smith noticed 305 

SLOCUM, George E. Wheatland, Monroe 
co., New York, brief sketch of its history 
noticed 203 

SMALL genealogy, descendants of Edward, 
by L. A. W. Underhill noticed 196 

SMITH, Elisha W., administrator of estate 
1803 375 

Frances Amelia, ancestry of, by H. S. L. 
Barnes noticed 95 

Joseph 1844-1908. Thomas J. Gargan. A 
memorial; with appendix containing 
addresses delivered by him on various 
occasions noticed 198 

Lillian Clayton Old Canaan during the Re- 
volution noticed 305 

Marianne, ancestry, by J. S. Harris noticed 
92 

SNELL, Perez, administration of estate 1798 
374 

Society for the Preservation of New England 
Antiquities, bulletin, vol. 1, no. 2 noticed 
306 

Society of Colonial Wars in the State of Cali- 
fornia, register 1910 noticed 205 

Society of Genealogists of London, incorpo- 
rated May 8, 1911, history noticed 386 



Society of the Sons of the American Revolu- 
tion, Calif, constitution, bylaws, and 
members, 1910, by T. A. Perkins and E. 
Bonnell 101 

Society of the Sons of the American Revolu- 
tion, Mass., register of membership, con- 
stitution, by-laws, and proceedings 1910 
noticed 205 

Society of the Sons of the American Revolu- 
tion, National, year-book 1910, by A. H. 
Clark noticed 205 

Society of the Sons of the American Revolu- 
tion, New Jersey, year-book 1910 noticed 
306 

Society of Sons of the Revolution in the State 
of California, register 1910 noticed 101 

Society of the Sons of the Revolution, New 
York, year-book 1909 101 

Sons of the Revolution, see Society of the Sons 
of the Revolution 

Southampton, Eng., pilgrim memorial, note 

89 
Southern California Historical Society, annual 

publications, vol. 8, pts. 1-2 noticed 386 

SPELMAN genealogy, descendants of Rich- 
ard of Middletown, Conn., by F. C. W. 
Barbour noticed 196 

SPENCER, Richard Pratt, notice lxiv 

SPINNEY, Thomas, notice 85 

SPRAGUE, Henry Harrison Founding ot 
Charlestown by the Spragues. A glimpse 
of the beginning of the Mass. Bay set- 
tlement noticed 98 

Ralph, memoir, in Founding of Charles- 
town, Mass. by the Spragues, by H. H. 
Sprague noticed 98 

Richard, memoir, in Founding of Charles- 
town, Mass. by the Spragues, by H. H. 
Sprague noticed 98 

William, memoir, in Founding of Charles- 
town, Mass. by the Spragues, by H. H. 
Sprague noticed 98 

SPRUNT, James, historical publications, pub. 
under the direction of the North Caro- 
lina Historical Society, vol. 9, no. 2 no- 
ticed 204 

Squirriel, ship, passengers for Nova Scotia 
1775 248 

STACYE, historical narrative, in An histori- 
cal narrative of the Ely, Revell, and 
Stacye families, by R. P., W. S., and 
D. B. Ely, noticed 193 

STAPLES genealogy noticed 384 

STARKEY, Clarissa Lawrence, ancestry of, 
by E. W. Leavitt noticed 95 

STAWELL, Col. George Donsworth A Quan- 
tock family. The Stawells of Cathel- 
stone and their descendants, the Barons 
Stawell of Somerton, and the Stawells 
of Devonshire and the County Cork 
noticed 196 

STAWELL genealogy, by G. D. Stawell no- 
ticed 196 

STEARNS, Ezra Scollay Ritter genealogy, 
descendants of Daniel Ritter of Lunen- 
burg, Mass. noticed 384 

Mary II. Bibliography of the scientific 
writings of R. E. C. Stearns with bi- 
ographical sketch noticed 385 

Robert Edwards Carter, biographical sketch- 
es and bibliography of his scientiflo 
writings, by M. R. Stearns and W. H. 
Dall noticed 385 

STETSON, George William Stetson kindred 
of America (inc.) Brief sketch of work 
of organization and account of second 
reunion, Aug. 18, 1906 noticed 197 



I 



Index of Subjects 



STETSON Kindred of America, second re- 
union, Aug. 18, 1906, account, by G. W. 
Stetson noticed 197 

STICKNEY, Alvah Franklin Stickney, 
Spaulding, Lawrence noticed 384 

STICKNEY genealogy, descendants of Alvah, 
by A. F. Stickney noticed 384 

STOCKTON, Dr. Thomas Coates Stockton 
family of New Jersey and other Stock- 
tons noticed 384 

STOCKTON genealogy, by T. C. Stockton no- 
ticed 384 

STONE, John, administration of estate 1806 
376 

STONE genealogy, descendants of John of 
Md., in preparation 383 

Stonington, Me., history, in Register of towns 
of Sedgwick, Brooklin etc., by Chatto 
and Turner noticed 386 

Stow, Mass., vital records to 1850 noticed 305 

STURTEVANT, Ralph Orson and C. L. 
Marsh History of the 13th regiment, 
Vermont volunteers, war of 1861-5 no- 
ticed 101 

Sussex County, Del., records, by C. H. B. 
Turner noticed 99 

SUTCLIFFE, Alice Crary Homestead of a 
colonial dame noticed 102 

SUTHERLAND genealogical records by D. 
Merritt noticed 95 

SWASEY, Benjamin Franklin Genealogy of 
the Swasey family noticed 197 

SWASEY genealogy, by B. F. Swasey noticed 
197 

Swedish Historical Society of America, year- 
book 1909-10 noticed 306 

SWEETrNG, Walter Debenham Family of 
Debenham of Suffolk noticed 193 

Syracuse Public library, genealogy and herald- 
ry, list, 1910 noticed 198 



Telden, see Tilden 

Telephone, history, by H. A. Casson noticed 
206 

THAYER, Dr. Charles Paine, notice 1 

THOMPSON, Gilbert, memoir, in Memorial 

Sapers of the Society of Colonial Wars in 
•istrict of Columbia, 1910, by M. Benja- 
min noticed 199 



Three Brothers, ship, passengers for Barba- 
dos 1776 251 

Ticonderoga, N. Y., history, memorial tablet 
noticed 305 

TILDEN and variants 
Hopestill, will 1662 326 
John, administration of estate 1638 325 

Telden, Joan, will 1476 322 
Robert, will 1480 323 

TYLDEN, John, will 1463 322 
Richard, will 1566 323 
Thoma3, will 1617 324 

TILDEN, baptisms, marriages, and burials 
from English parish registers 326 
pedigree, family of Crotehole, parish of Ben- 
ynden, Eng. 329 

TINGLEY, Raymon Meyers Tingley family, 
being a record of the descendants of 
Samuel Tingley of Maiden, Mass., in 
both male and female lines noticed 384 

TINGLEY genealogy, descendants of Samuel 
of Maiden, Mass., by R. M. Tingley no- 
ticed 384 



TOURTELOTTE, Col. Jerome History of 
Company K of the 7th Conn. Volunteer 
Infantry in the Civil war noticed 101 

TREADWAY, Nathaniel, wife, notes 295 
Sufferana, items 295 

TRUMBELL, Thomas, will 1803 375 

TURNER, Charles H. B. Some records of 
Sussex co. Del. noticed 99 

Tylden, see Tilden 



UNDERHILL, Lora Altine Woodbury De- 
scendants of Edward Small of New 
England, and the allied families, with 
tracings of English ancestry noticed 
196 

Unitarianism, biography of prophets, pio- 
neers, and preachers, ed. by S. A. Eliot 
noticed 199 

United States, Civil war, numbers and losses 
in, 1861-5, by T. L. Livermore noticed 
205 
Stonewall Jackson in, his campaigns and 
battles, history, by J. H. Wood noticed 
101 
Library of Congress, American and English 
genealogies in noticed 206 

URANN genealogy, by C. C. Whittier noticed 
95 

Utah Genealogical and Historical Magazine, 
vol. 1 noticed 203 



VANCE, David, will 1810 378 

Vermont, legislative directory, 1910, by G. W. 

Bailey noticed 206 
vital records, act, 1910 299 
volunteers, 13th regiment in the Civil war, 

history, by R. O. Sturtevant and C. L. 

Marsh noticed 101 

Virginia, eastern shore, history, 17th century, 
by J. C. Wise noticed 305 
state library, 7th annual report of the library 
board, 1909-10, annual report of the 
state librarian, and seals of Va. noticed 
385 



WAITE genealogy, descendants of John of 
Maiden, Mass., 2d ed., in preparation 
383 

WALKER, James M., memoir noticed 304 
Richard, memoir, in The three Lynn cap- 
tains, Robert Bridges, Thomas Marsh- 
all, and Richard Walker, read before 
the Lynn Historical Society, Feb. 1910, 
by C. E. Mann noticed 384 

WALKLEY, Stephen Genealogical index of 
some descendants of Richard Walkley of 
Haddam noticed 197 

WALKLEY genealogy, descendants of Rich- 
ard, by S. Walkley noticed 197 

WARD(E), George Kemp Andrew Warde 
and descendants, 1597-1910 noticed 96 
John, will 1804 375 
Paul Theodore Bliss, notice lvii 

WARD(E) genealogy, descendants of An- 
drew, by G. K. \Vard noticed 96 
descendants of Rev. David, by F. B. Ham- 
lin noticed 95 

WARNE genealogy, descendants of Thomas, 
by G. W. Labaw noticed 303 

WARNER, Gen. Jonathan, will 1803 375 
WASHBURN, Joseph, will 1810 377 378 
WATERHOUSE genealogy in preparation 
192 



Index of Subjects 



m 



WATERS, Wilson Paragraphs, portraits, and 
pictures supplementary to history of St. 
Luke's church, Marietta, Ohio noticed 
305 

WATKINS, Albert Outline of Nebraska his- 
tory noticed 305 

WATSON, Annah Robinson Of sceptred race 
noticed 198 
Martha Ziegler Watson genealogy, 17C0- 
1909 noticed 96 

WATSON genealogy, by M. Z. Watson no- 
ticed 96 

WEEKS, Harriet Morse Descendants of 
Samuel Morse of Worthington, Mass. 
noticed 195 

WELLS, Reuben Field and Daniel White 
History of Hatfield, Mass., 1660-1910 
noticed 98 

WENDELL, Henry A. Ancestry and de- 
scendants of the late Isaac Wendell of 
Portsmouth, N. H. noticed 303; ad- 
denda noticed 303 
Isaac, ancestry and descendants, by H. A. 
Wendell noticed 303; addenda noticed 
303 

WEST, ancestry of Anne, in Some account of 
Capt. John Frazier, by J. G. Leach no- 
ticed 92 

West Boylston, Mass., vital records to 1850 
noticed 204 

Westfield, N. Y., First Presbyterian church, 
centennial celebration, 1908 history no- 
ticed 99 

Weston, co. Herts, Eng., Fairclough Hall, 
historical account noticed 200 

Wheatland, N. Y., history, by G. E. Slocum 

noticed 203 
WHETEN, George, almanac 1754, notice 381 

WHIDDEN, Capt. John D. Ocean life in the 
old sailing ship days noticed 206 

WHITCHER, William F. Haverhill, N. H., 
history noticed 98 

WHITE, Elmer L. Descendants of Jonathan 
Kearsley, from Scotland who settled at 
Carlisle, Pa. noticed 195 
Jacob, administration of estate 1807 376 

WHITING Club Memorial noticed 201 

WHITNEY, Hezekiah, will 1801 374 
James Lyman, notice lxii 
Sarah, will 1803 375 

WHITTIER, Charles Collyer Urann family 
noticed 95 

WHITTIER genealogy in preparation 191 

WILKINSON, George, administration of es- 
tate 1805 376 

WILLARD, John Ware History of Simon 
Willard, inventor and clockmaker, to- 
gether with some account of his sons, 
apprentices, the workmen associated 
with him, and brief notices of other 
clockmakers of the family name noticed 
385 
Simon, inventor and clockmaker, memoir, 
by J. W. Willard noticed 385 

WILLIAMS, Edmund, notice 381 

WILLIAMS genealogy, family of Wethers- 
field, Conn., by M. E. Poole noticed 96 

WILLISTON, Josiah, diary 1808-14 366 

WILSON records from the Bible of Jonathan 
of Thompson, Conn. 349 

WING, William Arthur Some Wings of Old 
Dartmouth and their homes noticed 
197 

WING, genealogical records, families of Old 
Dartmouth, by W. A. Wing noticed 
197 



WISE, Jennings Cropper Ye kingdome of 
Accawmacke or the eastern shore of 
Virginia in the 17th century noticed 
305 

WOLCOTT, meeting of family, descendants 
of Henry of Windsor, Conn., held Aug. 
1908, 1909, and 1910, noticed 197 

WOOD, James H. The War. Stonewall 
Jackson, his campaigns and battles, the 
regiment, as I saw them noticed 101 

WOODBURY, Charles Jeptha Hill Sketch 
of John Page Woodbury with his geneal- 
ogy from John Woodbury, in Register 
of the Lynn Historical Society 1910 no- 
ticed 304 
John Page, memoir, by C J. H. Woodbury, 
in Register of the Lynn Historical So- 
ciety 1910 noticed 304; notice noticed 
lix 

WOODBURY genealogy, descendants of John , 
by C. J. H. Woodbury, in Register of 
the Lynn Historical Society 1910 noticed 
304 

WOODEN, Emily Beaman History of de- 
scendants of Gamaliel Beaman and Sa- 
rah Clark of Dorchester and Lancaster, 
Mass. noticed 90 

WOODMAN genealogy in preparation 90 

WOODS, Henry Ernest The Massachusetts 

laws and commission of public records 

noticed 206 
Twenty-third report of public records of 

parishes, towns, and counties of Mass., 

1910 noticed 306 
Woods family of Groton, Mass., noticed 

96 

WOODS genealogy, descendants of Samuel 
of Groton, Mass., by H. E. Woods no- 
ticed 96 

WOODWARD genealogy, descendants of Dr. 
Henry, first English settler in South 
Carolina, by J. W. Barnwell noticed 

197 

WORTH, Henry B. The development of the 
New England dwelling house noticed 
385 

Worthington, Mass., vital records to 1850 no- 
ticed 306 

WRIGHT genealogy, descendants of Samuel 
of Lenox, Mass., in preparation 89 

WYMAN, Isaac Chauncey, notice lviii 



Yale University, bibliography of class books, 

class records, 1792-1910, by W. P. Bacon 

noticed 204 
class of '89, vicennial record, by C. H. Sher- 

rill noticed 385 
class of 1904, sexennial record, ed. by G. E. 

Parks noticed 304 
class of 1908, vol. 1, ed. by Davis, Holliday, 

and Luther noticed 204 
class of 1909, history, vol. 1, ed. by H. P. 

Stokes, W. W. Borden, and E. O. Proc- 
tor noticed 304 
graduates, biographical sketches 1792-1805, 

by F. B. Dexter noticed 385 
Sheffield Scientific school, biographical re- 

cord of members 1868-72 noticed 304 
class of 1890, biographical record, ed. by 

H. G. Day, class secretary noticed 204 

YATES, Richard Descendants of Michael 
Yates by his sons, Abner and John no- 
ticed 198 

YATES genealogy, descendants of Michael, 
by R. Yates noticed 198 

York County, Me., soldiers in the American 
Revolution, list 76 107 254 333 

YOUNG, Harry, notice xlvi 




Qjzu^x^J^Aa^^-Xx 



THE 

NEW ENGLAND 

HISTORICAL AND GENEALOGICAL 

REGISTER 



JANUARY, 1911 



CHARLES EDWIN HURD 

By Edward Henry Clement, A.M., Litt.D., of Cambridge, Mass. 

Charles Edwin Hurd, the late literary editor of the Boston 
Transcript , became a member of the New England Historic Gene- 
alogical Society in 1895, and at once his accomplishments in lan- 
guages and history made him a distinguished and valuable member. 
His natural tastes had led him, in his maturity, to the study of the 
Scandinavian tongues and literature, and he did not rest until he 
had acquired an actual and practical command of the Swedish and 
Norwegian languages. He was the personal friend of the great 
Norwegian litterateur and statesman, Bjornstjerne Bjornson, and a 
translator of and commentator upon the plays of Ibsen. The 
threads of our New England descent extend back to the common 
sources of all the Northern peoples of Europe. There is a kinship 
of spirit in their free, representative political ideas and institutions. 
It was always a fascinating diversion for him to trace these lines in 
history and literature, as a collateral interest with his genealogical 
avocation. He will be missed among contributors, for such scholar- 
ship is all too rare among American genealogists. 

Mr. Hurd was born in Croydon, N. H., June 15, 1833. His 
father, a farmer of long descent in that region, traced back to Sec- 
retary Rawson of the Colonial government. Young Hurd was en- 
abled to supplement the common school education with a term at 
Hempstead Academy. In his youth, thereafter, he went through 
the usual experience of those who had enjoyed such advantages, of 
teaching, in his turn, in the district school. Then at twenty he 
came to Boston and found congenial employment on the city and 
suburban newspapers. Thus were laid the foundations for his sub- 
sequent development and career as litterateur. 

But Hurd had also a strong predilection, and no small gift, for 
art in all its phases, especially for painting and the drama. He be- 
came so much of a devotee of the theatre that at one time he had 
serious thoughts of going upon the stage, and only abandoned this 
purpose after an actual experience in small parts in one of the Bos- 
ton stock-companies. Then he was determined to be an artist. 
He took a course of lessons with a Boston painter and soon set up a 
studio for himself in the old Studio Building, at that time new, 
vol. lxv. 1 



4 Charles Edwin Hurd [Jan. 

without, however, losing his hold on journalism. This combination 
of talents stood him in good stead during the Civil War, making 
him invaluable, with his double faculty, as a war correspondent. It 
also led to that unique experience, which he made the most of both 
with pen and pencil, in the short-lived invasion of Canada, in 
the summer of 1870, by the Fenians' Falstaffian army from across 
the Vermont border near St. Albans. He was accompanying his 
friend John Boyle O'Reilly, the Irish poet and editor of the Pilot, 
when the command of the Fenian army devolved on O'Eeilly, though 
he was present only as correspondent of his paper, after the prompt 
arrest of its " general " by the United States marshal. Hurd repre- 
sented Frank Leslie's Illustrated Newspaper in the raid, and his 
pictures and text remain the classic chronicle of that extraordinary 
episode, giving to the full its comic, as well as its tragic, elements. 
From 1870 to 1875 Hurd was settling down more determinedly to 
his profession of journalism and letters. Stepping onward from the 
editorship of a New York "up-State" paper, the Erie Dispatch, 
to an editorial position in Providence and engagements on the Bos- 
ton Journal and the Boston Globe, he reached, in 1875, the liter- 
ary chair of the Boston Transcript, That great position he held 
with groAving honor, success, and usefulness for the rest of his 
active life in service of the public. For he administered his trust 
always under a strong conscientious sense of its public relations and 
responsibilities. He conducted it as though it had its part to play 
in the discovery and greeting and nurturing of all coming-on talent. 
His associates can testify to his self-effacing, self-sacrificing devotion, 
and not merely to the arduous duty of his post, but also to the 
highest interests of the community in the faithful holding up of the 
standards of taste and culture in the then undisputed literary centre 
of America. He gave only too lavishly of his time and toil in study- 
ing the work of others, whether in books or manuscripts, lest he 
might do less than justice to any aspiring endeavor brought to his no- 
tice. He would not have it on his conscience possibly to discourage 
a struggling candidate for the public attention at a critical moment — 
one who might prove a valuable addition to the literary guild. He 
would day after day patiently listen to, and counsel with, such as- 
pirants till the working-hours were past, and he must in consequence 
sit at his desk through half the night to finish his own required work. 
In 1901, while toiling at night at his accumulated tasks alone in 
the office, a large and heavy dictionary slipped from his hands, and, 
falling upon his foot, inflicted such injuries that, after months of 
terrible suffering endured, gangrene set in. First his toes were 
amputated ; then he lost his foot ; and many dragging months after, 
the whole leg. His retirement was thus enforced, but still he was 
prized and retained in the service and pay of his generous and sympa- 
thetic employer, the Transcript. Besides, he wrote for the maga- 
zines and assisted in the compilation of books for other publishers, 
happily occupied and doing valuable service to the end. 



1911] James Brown of Middletown, Conn. 5 

His loyalty to Boston was such that, although he was most com- 
fortably provided for and delightfully situated in Brooklyn, N. Y., 
he insisted on removing with his household gods to Boston just to 
spend amid the old scenes the last years of his life. It proved to be 
only months, but he was serenely happy all the while ; and the end 
came without any shock or struggle. It was simply a natural and 
beautiful sinking peacefully into a well-earned rest. 

The simplest of services was read over his body by his old friend 
Rev. E. A. Horton. By his express request no other words were 
said ; and from his new home in Allston the remains were taken to 
Lempster, N. H., for burial. Mr. Hurd is survived by his widow, 
who is a native of Nova Scotia, one daughter, Mrs. Morrill W. 
Gaines (Grace Marguerite Hurd) of Brooklyn, N. Y., and three 
sons, Charles W., William J., and Reginald Hurd. 



JAMES BROWN OF MIDDLETOWN, CONN. 

By Edwin A. Hill, Ph.D., of Washington, D. C. 

The Register (vol. 62, p. 334) contains a very brief and incomplete 
account of the descendants of James 1 Brown of Middletown, and while 
his male descendants were not numerous, the female lines of descent are 
quite the reverse. 

Many years since the writer and his father traced the descendants of 
Hugh 2 (James 1 ), and from this material and from data furnished by Mrs. 
Fowler (No. 23, v) the following more complete account of the family has 
been prepared. 

It is stated in the Register (vol. 15, p. 162) that James 1 Brown "was 
a Scotchman from Edinburg and a merchant." Various stories have come 
down through different lines, and New York, Boston, and Philadelphia, 
respectively, are given as his place of landing. The most reliable infor- 
mation, obtained from his granddaughter, Mrs. Sarah (Brown) GrifTmg, is 
that he came early in life to New York, and had to work for the ship's 
owners, after his arrival, to pay for his passage. 

The first authentic record that we have of him is from the town records 
of Guilford, Conn., where on 26 Sept. 1716 he purchased a residence of 
Abram Bradley. In the deed he is described as " James Brown dealer 
now resident." On 6 Dec. 1717 he sold the same property to Abraham 
Bartlett, and is then described as " transient trader," a term applied to 
those who went about the country buying horses and bringing them to the 
coast for shipment. On Windham town records a deed appears, dated 1 1 
Dec. 1716, from Eleazur Allen to James Brown of Gilford, etc. 

He was married at Windham, Conn., 10 Mar. 1718, to Esther 
Broughton, daughter of John and Hannah (Allis), born 10 Feb. 1700 
(n. s.), died 29 Oct. 1754. He lived two or three years at Windham, and 
then removed to Middletown, Conn., where on 2 Dec. 1742 he bought 
land of Jabez Hamilin, on which he built his home and in which he lived 
and died. In Sept. 1770 he conveyed this property to his sons Samuel, 
Hugh, and Nathaniel, and his daughter Elizabeth Cooper, "for the con- 
sideration of the paternal love and affection that I have for my children, 



6 James Brown of Middletown , Conn, [Jan. 

and also for the comfortable support of me and my son John Brown during 
our natural lives." In a will made in July of the same year he states 
that his daughter Mary's portion had already been given to her son Isaac. 

He was married secondly to Mary (Doavd, probably), but of this mar- 
riage no record has been found. She died 23 Apr. 1767, aged 69. During 
his last years he lived with his son Nathaniel, as did also the brother John, 
who from the effects of a fall in childhood was imbecile through a long 
life. a James Brown died 10 Dec. 1770, in his 96th year (gravestone), 
and Esther, his wife, died 29 Oct. 1754, in her 56th year (gravestone). 
Both were buried in the old Riverside Cemetery in Middletown. 

Children : 

2. i. Mary, 2 b. 8 Sept. 1719. 

ii. James, b. 29 Jan. 1720-1 ; d. 3 Sept. 1736. 
iii. John, b. 4 Mar. 1724-5. 

3. iv. Samuel, b. 28 Aug. 1726. 

v. Thomas, b. 16 May 1728 ; drowned in Long Island Sound 16 Mar. 
1749. 

4. vi. Hugh, b. 21 Apr. 1730. 

vii. Elisha, b. 14 Aug. 1731 ; d. 29 Sept. 1754. 
viii. Esther, b. 28 Oct. 1733 ; d. 22 Dec. 1750. 

5. ix. Nathaniel, b. 7 Sept. 1735. 

x. James, b. 7 Mar. 1739 ; d. at sea 5 Oct. 1757. 

6. xi. Elizabeth, b. 5 Oct. 1740. 

2. Mary 2 Brown (James 1 ), born in Windham, Conn., 8 Sept. 1719, 

died 22 Feb. 1743. She married, 22 Sept. 1737, Joseph Wil- 
liams, son of Samuel and Elizabeth (Hunnewell) of Wethersfield, 
Conn., born 29 Jan. 1713, died 4 June 1746. 
Children : 

i. Elizabeth Williams, b. 28 Nov. 1737; d. 5 Jan. 1739. 

ii. Isaac Williams, b. 21 Nov. 1741; m. 3 Nov. 1771, Lois Fairchild, 
bapt. 20 Mar. 1742-3, supposed to have been the dau. of Edmund 
and Mary (Seaward) of Durham, Conn. (Durham Records, vol. 8, 
pp. 133-4). They were living in Middletown, Conu., in 1799. 
Children: 1. Isaac, b. 30 July 1772; d. 11 Aug. 1775. 2. Molly, 
b. 24 July 1774 ; d. 22 Aug. 1775. 3. A son, b. and d. 6 July 1776. 
4. Mary, b. 1 July 1778 ; m. 14 Oct. 1797, Amasa Smith, b. 22 July 
1774, son of Isaac and Jerusha (Brooks) of Chatham, Conn., where 
they lived and had six children : Elizabeth Powers, b. 10 July 1798, 
Lois Fairchild, b. 28 Nov. 1799, Mary Seaward, b. 5 May 1801, 
Caroline Brooks, b. 14 Mar. 1803, Amasa, b. 29 Jan. 1805, and 
Sally Lewis, b. 10 June 1807. 5. Isaac, b. 27 Dec. 1780; d. 19 
Oct. 1834; m. at Colchester, Conn., 4 Apr. 1803, Anna Chapman 
of Colchester, who d. 31 Oct. 1857, aged 76: lived in Millington 
Parish, East Haddam, Conn. ; had a dau. Julia Ann, who d. there 
28 May 1808, aged 2, and perhaps others. 

3. Samuel 2 Brown (James 1 ), born in Middletown, Conn., 28 Aug. 

1726, married, 5 Oct. 1747, Hannah Landon, daughter of Judge 
Samuel and Bethia (Tuthill), b born 2 Nov. 1724. He lived in 
Guilford, Conn., until 1802-3, when he removed to Madison (then 

a In 1880 the vital records of Edinburgh, Scotland, were searched, and the following 
record was found, which would appear to be, probably, the baptism of James of Mid- 
dletown : 

" 1673 18 February, Thomas Brown Merchant & Margaret Wallace a son named 
James Witnesses James Brown Merchant James McCline Merchant, John Sympson, 
Alexander McAlexander, & John Wallace Cordiner." 

The above is evidently old style dating, and reduced to new style would become 
28 Feb. 1674. His age at "death was, therefore, 96 years 9 months and 10 days. 

b See Grilling Genealogy, p. 41, note. 



1911] James Brown of Middletown, Conn. 7 

East Guilford), but returned to Guilford in 1813, and died there 
4 June 1815. He and his wife, who died 25 Sept. 1812, aged 88, 
are buried in the Madison Cemetery. 
Children : 

i. Mary, 3 b. 6 July 1748; d. 21 Feb. 1785; m. 13 Dec. 1772, Capt. 

Joseph Bradley of New Haven, Conn., who went to Troy, N. Y., 

and d. 6 Nov. 1803 ; no children, 
ii. Hannah, b. 6 May 1750; d. 15 Oct. 1754. 
iii. Parnel, b. 24 Jan. 1753 ; d. 3 Dec. 1755. 
iv. Samuel, b. 29 Dec. 1756 ; d. 15 Oct. 1764. 

7. v. Clarissa, b. 2 Dec. 1759. 

vi. Hannah, b. 29 July 1762 ; d. 19 Nov. 1764. 

8. vii. William, b. 30 Nov. 1764. 

9. viii. Sarah, b. 3 June 1767. 

4. Hugh 2 Brown {James 1 ), born 21 Apr. 1730, died 14 June 1815. 

He married, 2 Jan. 1772, Olive Sage, daughter of Gideon and 
Bathsheba (White), born 25 Mar. 1744, and died 6 June 1793. 
He was by trade a hatter, and lived all his life in Middletown, the 
latter portion at the " Upper Houses," so-called (now Cromwell). 
A " Hugh Brown " appears as private in the muster roll of Capt. 
Mott's company, raised for the defence of the harbor of New 
London in 1776 (Conn. Men in the Revolution, p. 617). It was 
probably Hugh, 2 for no other of this name is known in any of the 
Connecticut families of Brown. 
Children : 

A son, 3 b. 18 Mar. 1773; d. 19 Mar. 1773. 

Olive, b. 11 Dec. 1776. 

Elizabeth, b. 29 Apr. 1778. 

Mary Ann, b. 1 Nov. 1780. 

Clarissa, b. 28 May 1783. 

Martha, b. 26 Oct. 1785. 

5. Nathaniel 2 Brown (James 1 ), born 7 Sept. 1735, married at Mid- 
dletown, Conn.', 15 Apr. 1756, Sarah Merriman of Wallingford, 
Conn., who died 16 Aug. 1823, aged 87. "Colonel" Nathaniel 
Brown died 11 Dec. 1806, aged 71. They lived in Middletown. 

Children : 

Nathaniel, 3 b. 26 Aug. 1756. 

Elisha, b. 24 Nov. 1758 ; d. soon. 

Ellsiia, b. 5 Mar. 1761 ; lost at sea Mar. 1781. 

Thomas, b. 24 June 1763 ; m. 1 Sept. 1787 ; d. in Lansingburg, N. Y., 

18 Oct. 1803, it is said without issue. 
Sarah, b. 21 Julv 1765. 
Esther, b. 7 Sept. 1767. 
Hannah, b. 31 Dec. 1771. 
viii. Mary, b. 14 May 1774; bur. 9 Apr. 1777. 
19. ix. Lucy, b. 6 May 1776. 

6. Elizabeth 2 Brown (James 1 ), born 5 Oct. 1740, died 5 Oct. 1817. 
She married, 27 May 1770, Lamberton Cooper, son of Capt. 
Lamberton and Abigail (Clark), born 10 July 1745, died "in a 
fit" 26 Aug. 1815. They resided at Middletown, Conn. 

Children : 

i. Elizabeth Cooper, b. 18 Mar. 1771; d. 8 July 1802; m. 28 Feb. 
1795, Capt. John 2 Pratt, "an odicer of the Revolution," b. 1753, 
son of Zechariah and Abigail (Cook), who lived in Hartford, and 

c See Sage Genealogy, p. 47, 





l. 


10. 


ii. 


11. 


iii. 


12. 


iv. 


13. 


v. 


14. 


vi. 



15. 


l. 




ii. 




iii. 




iv. 


16. 


v. 


17. 


vi. 


18. 


vii 



8 James Brown of 'Middletown, Conn, [Jan, 

d. 27 Dec. 1824. Children: 1. John Cooper, b. 22 Jan. 1798; d. 
30 May 1875; m. Harriet Butler. 2. Emily Matilda, b. 17 Aug. 
1797; d. 8 Nov. 1870; m. Elijah H. Roberts. 3. Elizabeth Brown, 
b. 28 Dec. 1798 ; d. 21 Jan. 1860. 4. Abigail Cook, b. 1 Nov. 1800 ; 
d. 3 July 1861. 5. James Timothy, b. 15 Dec. 1802. 6. Eleanor 
Maria, b. 7 May 1805; d. 28 Jan. 1879; m. Charles Woodward. 
7. Mary Louise, b. 7 Nov. 1807 ; d. 2 June 1834. 8. Charles Har- 
mon, b. 19 Apr. 1810; d. 25 June 1890. 
ii. Olive Cooper, b. 6 Apr. 1774; d. 27 Aug. 1819; m. 9 Apr. 1796, 
William Clark Hall, b. 5 Apr. 1770, d. 24 Aug. 1823, son of 
Zechariah and Mehetable (Patton) of Medford, Mass. Children: 
1. Elizabeth Brown, b. 6 Jan. 1797. 2. William Zachariah, b. 8 
Apr. 1798 ; d. 5 Aug. 1846. 3. Samuel Cooper, b. 8 Sept. 1799. 

4. Mehetable Patton, b. 16 Mar. 1801 ; d. unra. 5. David, b. 9 Aug. 
1802 ; m. Hannah Shirly. 6. Charles Edwin, b. 30 July 1804 ; m. 
Mary E. Smith. 7. James Brown, b. 12 Mar. 1806; m. Elizabeth 
B. Cooper. 8. Olive Cooper, b. 2 Feb. 1808; m. George Walker. 
9. Joseph Patton, b. 14 Nov. 1809 ; m. Laura Murdage. 10. Henry 
Bowers, b. 10 Apr. 1812 ; d. 5 Mar. 1868. 11. Edward Smith, b. 11 

Feb. 1814; m. Jarvis. 12. Lamberton Cooper, b. 13 Oct. 

1816; m. Emma Thompson. 13. Janette Cooper, b. 5 Apr. 1819; 
d. 23 Aug. 1819. 

iii. William Cooper, b. 3 July 1776 ; d. 13 Mar. 1820 ; m. 28 Oct. 1808, 
Jeannette Riley of Wethersfield, Conn., b. 1780, d. 11 Apr. 1837. 
Children : 1. William Brown, b. 30 Oct. 1803 ; m. (1) Margaret M. 
Johnson; m. (2) Harriet Beverly. 2. Jane Riley, b. 18 Aug. 1805. 

iv. Samuel Cooper, b. 22 Jan. 1781; d. 19 Apr. 1863; m. (1) 11 May 
1805, Hannah Cushing Bowers, dau. of Lloyd and Margaret 
(Phillips) of Somerset, Mass. ; m. (2) 27 June 1844, Cecelia Starr, 
b. 19 Oct. 1793, d. 7 Jan. 1861, dau. of Jehosaphat and Mary 
(Warne). Children: 1. Lamberton, b. 6 May 1806; d. 7 Feb. 
1826. 2. Margaret Bowers, b. 12 Feb. 1808; d. 16 Aug. 1823- 
3. Lloyd Bowers, b. 18 Feb. 1810 ; d. at New Orleans, La., 26 Sept. 
1830. 4. Elizabeth Brown, b. 23 Oct. 1811; m. James B. Hall. 

5. Esther Phillips, b. 1 Dec. 1813; d. 4 Oct. 1815. 6. Hannah 
Bowers, b. 20 Mar. 1816; d. 19 Oct. 1868. 7. Mary Eugenia,b. 11 
July 1818; d. 17 July 1867. 8. Laura Florian, b. 24 June 1821; 
m. Chandler Robbins. 9. Samuel, b. 6 July 1823 ; d. 19 June 
1885. 

7. Clarissa 3 Brown (Samuel* James 1 ), born 2 Dec. 1759, died 3 Feb. 

1816. She married, 8 Mar. 1780, Frederick Redfield, M.D., 
of Middletown, Conn., born at Killingworth (Clinton), Conn., 29 
July 1755, died at Guadeloupe, W. I., 13 Dec. 1797, of yellow 
fever, son of Ebenezer and Hannah (Colton). (See Redfield Gen.) 
Children : 

i. Ebenezer Redfield, b. 24 Aug. 1781 ; d. 17 Sept. 1798. 

ii. Samuel Brown Redfield, b. 15 Oct. 1784; d. at Hartford, Conn., 
22 May 1854; m. 25 Sept. 1808, Maria Hudson, b. 1790-1, d. 26 
Jan. 1857, dau. of David and Mary (Hall) of New Haven, Conn. 
Children: 1. Mary Augusta, b. at Middletown June 1810; d. 14 
June 1842. 2. Frederick Hudson, b. at Hartford 1 Dec. 1811 ; d. 
6 Aug. 1877 ; m. 18 Oct. 1860, Charlotte Spencer ; lived in Hart- 
ford. 3. Clarissa Brown, b. 20 Nov. 1818; d. 13 Sept. 1855; m. 
at Clinton, La., 12 Sept. 1854, James D. Cross. 4. Jane Hudson, 
b. 20 Aug. 1820; d. June 1867. 5. William Brown, b. 19 Nov. 
1827; m. at Dixon, 111., 13 July 1856, Sarah De Forrest Smith of 
Hartford, Conn. ; resided at St. Louis, Mo., in 1858. 

iii. Henry Redfield, b. 8 May 1786; d. 13 Aug. 1815. 

iv. Frederick Jared Redfield, b. 23 July 1788 ; lived at Petersburg, 
Va. ; d. without issue. 

8. William 3 Brown (Samuel* James 1 ), born 30 Nov. 1764, died 8 Nov* 

1803. He married, 22 Jan. 1795, Rachel Bishop, born 30 July 



1911] James Brown of Middletown, Conn, 9 

1771, died 22 July 1850, daughter of Josiah and Anne (Crampton) 
of East Guilford (Madison), Conn., who married secondly, as his 
second wife, 3 Jan. 1813, Maj. John Caldwell of Hartford, Conn., 
born 21 Dec. 1755, died 26 May 1838. Mr. Brown was an A.B. 
of Yale, 1784, and a man of some prominence in local politics. He 
is buried in Centre Church graveyard at Hartford. 
Children : 

20. i. Mary Ann, 4 b. 10 Feb. 1796. 

21. ii. Clabissa, b. 6 Apr. 1798. 

22. iii. Wealthy Frances, b. 15 May 1800. 

23. iv. Samuel William, b. 13 Apr. 1802. 

v. Margaret Clifford, b. 8 Apr. 1804 ; d. 12 May 1860. 

9. Sarah 3 Brown (Samuel, 2 James 1 ), born 3 June 1767, died 1 June 
1865. She married, 3 Nov. 1787, Nathaniel Griffing, born 
26 Jan. 1767, died 17 Sept. 1845, son of Jasper and Rachel (Lee) 
(see Griffing Genealogy). 
Children : 

i. Mary Griffing, b. 3 Apr. 1793; d. 26 Sept. 1794. 

ii. Roger Griffing, b.24 Mar. 1796; d. unm. 17 Nov. 1822. 

iii. Frederick Redfield Griffing, b. 5 Nov. 1798 ; d. 13 Oct. 1852. 

iv. Mary Griffing, b. 6 Feb. 1801 ; d. 21 Mar. 1878; m. 10 Mar. 1828, 
Henry W. Chittenden, son of Abraham and Lydia (Baldwin- 
Rose), b. 7 Dec. 1794, d. 30 Oct. 1867. Child : Sarah Brown, b. 18 
June 1835; m. (1) at Guilford, Conn., 14 Sept. 1859, Edward H. 
Owen, b. 27 Nov. 1824, d. 28 May 1864, son of Charles M. and 
Mary G. (Thrall) ; m. (2) Henry D. Cone; no issue. 

v. William Brown Griffing, b. 6 Aug. 1803; d. unm. 25 Aug. 1820. 

vi. Nancy Griffing, b. 6 Mar. 1806 ; d. 20 Apr. 1807. 

vii. Samuel Nathaniel Griffing, b. 24 Dec. 1808 ; d. 2 Oct. 1810. 

viii. A son, b. 12 Jan. 1813 ; d. 14 Jan. 1813. 

10. Olive 8 Brown (Hugh* James 1 ), born 11 Dec. 1775, died 13 Jan. 

1838. She married, 20 Mar. 1796, Giles Dowd of Madison, 
Conn., born 19 Sept. 1774, died 17 June 1841, son of Didymus and 

Mercy ( ). They resided at Madison. 

Children : 

i. Laura Sage Dowd, b. 6 Apr. 1797; d. 15 Aug. 1822; m. 13 Jan. 
1820, Iciiabod Benjamin Scranton, b. 4 Nov. 1793, d. 27 Dec. 
1862, son of Abram and Lucv (Stone) ; resided at Madison. Child : 
Laura JenneUe, b. 21 Nov. 1820 ; m. 31 Oct. 1842, Harvey E. Crit- 
tenden, b. 8 Jan. 1821, of East River, Conn. 

ii. Alfred Dowd, b. 13 Aug. 1799 ; d. 5 Oct. 1806. 

iii. Patty Dowd, b. 5 Apr. 1803; d. 12 Dec. 1806. 

iv. Giles Dowd, b. 21 Mar. 1806 ; d. 8 Oct. 1806. 

v. Capt. Alfred Giles Dowd, b. 6 Oct. 1809; d. 10 Jan. 1853; m. 24 
Nov. 1833, Harriet C. Scranton, b. 18 Oct. 1811, dau. of Abram 
F. and Clarissa (Griswold). Children: 1. Laura Clarissa, b. 5 
June 1835; m. 15 Jan. 1857, Edwin L. Drake (driller of the first 
oil well), b. 29 Mar. 1819, d. 8 Nov. 1880; children: Alfred Lee, 
Charles Henry, and Mary Laura. 2. Mary Jane, b. 22 Oct. 1838; 
m. 1 July 1857, Henry D. Chittenden, b. 22 Dec. 1835; resided at 
Guilford, Conn. ; children : Edward J., and John 8. 8. Katherint 
Maria, b. 10 Dec. 1841; m. 27 Aug. 1877, John B. Johnson; one 
child : Mabel L. 

11. Elizabeth 8 Brown (Hugh, 7 James 1 ), born 20 Apr. 1778, died 1 Apr. 

1855. She married, 21 Sept. 1797, Julius Wilcox, born May 
1769, died 5 Oct. 1825, son of Ezra and Bather (Meigs) of Guil- 
ford, Conn. They removed to Middletown, Conn., where they re- 
mained until about 1808, when they removed to Middlebury, Vt. 



10 James Brown of Middletown, Conn. [Jan. 

Children : 

i. Harvey Wilcox, b. 5 July 1799; d. 23 Sept. 1860; m. 6 Oct. 1829, 
Mary Curtis, b. 24 Apr. 1803, d. 9 Apr. 1880, dau. of Charles and 
Amy (Stevens) of Newburg, N. Y. ; resided at Middlebury, Vt. 
Children: 1. Harriet Elizabeth, b. 18 Nov. 1830; m. (1) 30 Nov. 
1854, Byron M. Denison; m. (2) 21 Dec. 1857, Guilford D. San- 
born, M.D. ; no issue. 2. Harvey Curtis, b. 30 Nov. 1837; m. 1 
Aug. 1867, Victoria A. Taylor ; one son : Lawrence C. 

ii. Mary Wilcox, b. 13 July 1801 ; d. 19 Aug. 1801. 

iii. Giles Sage Wilcox, b. 30 Sept. 1802 ; d. 9 Aug. 1806. 

iv. George Wilcox, b. 29 Oct. 1804; d. 3 Feb. 1869; m. Oct. 1833, 
Elizabeth Greenleaf, who d. 28 Dec. 1875, dau. of Tilley and 
Mary (Spafford) ; resided at Middlebury, Vt., near Buffalo, N. Y., 
and Arkansaw, Wis. Children : 1. Elizabeth Brown, b. 22 June 
1835 ; d. 25 June 1835. 2. Mary Elizabeth, b. 15 Nov. 1837 ; m. 13 
Oct. 1859, Henry M. Miles; children: Frank C, George M., Eva, 
Henry A., Clarke, Marion E., Nellie M., Harold M., and Calista M. 
3. George Greenleaf, b. June 1841; d. 21 Oct. 1858. 

v. Elizabeth Brown Wilcox, b. 9 Mar. 1807 ; d. 13 Apr. 1875 ; m. Kev. 
Nelson Z. Graves of Warrenton, N. C. ; no issue. 

vi. Giles Sage Wilcox, b. 2 May 1809 ; d. 10 July 1809. 

vii. Mary Olive Wilcox, b. 5 Feb. 1812; d. at East Liverpool, Ohio, 
6 Sept. 1884; m. 1 Oct. 1823, Dea. Cyrus Porter, b. 21 Feb. 1795, 
d. 1 Apr. 1857, son of Joseph and Susan (Langdon) of Farming- 
ton, Conn. ; resided at Middlebury, Vt. Children: 1. Col. Henry 
Martin, b. 25 Apr. 1835 ; m. 28 July 1864, Nina Fremont; no issue. 
2. George Langdon, b. 28 Jan. 1837; m. 24 Aug. 1864, Minerva E. 
Stowell, b. 31 July 1834, d. 3 Nov. 1884 ; children : Cora S., Emma 
L., and Maud F. 3. Eliza Wilcox,b. 29 Jan. 1839; m. 25 July 
1871, Rev. J. H\ Waddell; no issue. 4. Mary Brown, h. 21 Jan. 
1841 ; d. 13 Apr. 1880 ; m. 7 Aug. 1872, Rev. J. W. Shearer of De 
Land, Fla. ; four children. 5. Julius Wilcox, b. 24 Aug. 1843 ; m. 
2 Sept. 1874, Hattie E. Leonard; a son: Walter C. 6. Susan Ida, 
b. 1 Jan. 1848 ; m. 27 June 1866, Elisha Pike Hitchcock of Pitts- 
ford, Vt., b. 22 June 1845 ; children : Mary E., George P., Viola M., 
Erwin V., and Frank L. 7. Ella Graves, b. 17 Mar. 1849; m. 12 
Aug. 1874, Alfred Duff, b. 25 Oct. 1839, son of James and Mary 
(Ivers) ; lived at Brick Church, N. J. ; children : Mary E., Flora L., 
Ida J., and Alfred P. 8. Flora McDonald, b. 11 Dec. 1850 ; m. 25 
Nov. 1874, Farrand De Forest Kitchell, b. 4 Nov. 1849, son of Rev. 
Harvey D. and Ann (Sheldon) ; resided at East Liverpool, Ohio; 
children : Cornelius P., Helen B., Ralph T., and Allen F. 

viii. Julius Wilcox, b. 14 Mar. 1817; d. 29 June 1865; m. (1) 16 Oct. 
1845, Sarah Ann Nichols, b. 9 Dec. 1820, d. 14 May 1856, dau. of 

Rev. Noah and Mary Ann ( ) ; m. (2) Mattie Jane Holton, 

dau. of Asa and Orra ( ) ; resided at Warrenton, N. C. Chil- 
dren : 1. Cora Ellen, b. 30 Sept. 1846 ; m. 9 Sept. 1869, Col. John 
H. Gayle of Portsmouth, Va., b. 15 Jan. 1836, d. 5 July 1884; 
children : John H., Cora W., Sarah H., Edward M., and Mattie H. 
2. Ella Graves, b. 5 June 184K; d. 9 Apr. 1849. 3. Edward N., 
b. 20 May 1850; m. and d. without issue. 4. Julius Harvey, b. 2 
June 1852; d. unm. 5. Nelson Graves, b. 28 Nov. 1853; d. 16 
Feb. 1856. 6. Nelson Graves, b. 6 May 1856; d. 15 July 1856. 7. 
Mary Kate, b. 14 Jan. 1859; m. 19 Sept. 1883, Frank Patterson 
Hunter; resided at Warrenton, N. C. ; children: Mary H. and 
Mattie C. 8. Maurice Holton, b. 10 Mar. 1860; d. 18 Mar. 1879. 
9. Frank Evarts, b. 21 Oct. 1861. 10. Helen Leckie,h. 15 Sept. 
1863. 11. Mattie Julius, b. 27 Oct. 1865 ; d. 11 June 1866. 
ix. Henry J. Wilcox, b. 23 Aug. 1820; m. (1) 10 June 1849, Levinia 
E. Pritchard, b. 24 Nov. 1822, d. 10 June 1881, dau. of Harvey 
and Eunice (Douglas); m. (2) Electa K. (Witherell) Brown, 
dau. of Sylvester and Abigail (Turrill) of Shorehain, Vt., and 
widow of John Bancroft Brown; no issue. 

[To be concluded] 



1911] 



Lists of New England Soldiers 



11 



BEBLIOGKAPHY OF LISTS OF NEW ENGLAND 

SOLDIERS 

By Mart Ellen Baker, B.A. 
[Continued from vol. 64, page 336] 

[MASSACHUSETTS— LOCAL] 

974.42 Copeland, A. HI. ed. "Our country and its people : " a his- 
qC79 tory of Hampden county, Mass. 3 vols. N. Y. 1902. Miii- 

tary lists under names of towns. 

974.42 Gay, W. B. ...Gazetteer of Hampshire county, Mass., 1654- 

G25 1887... Syracuse, 1886. Roster of field, staff and company officers dur- 

ing the civil war, p. 106-11. 

974.43 Paige, L. R. Address at the centennial celebration in Hard- 
H221 wick, Mass., Nov. 15, 1838. Cambridge, 1838. Hardwick men 

in the French and Indian war, p. 58-9. 

974.43 Paige, L. R. History of Hardwick, Mass... Bost., 1883. 

H22 French and Indian war, p. 264-9. Revolution, p. 269-79. Civil war, 283-8. 

974.43 Nourse, H: S. History of the town of Harvard, Mass., 1732- 

H26 1893. Harvard, 1894. King George's war, p. 287. French and Indian, 

several lists, p. 289-301. Revolution, several lists, p. 316-50. Harvard soldiers 
in the rebellion, p. 356-64. 

974.43 Nourse, H : S. Military annals of Lancaster, Mass., 1740-1865, 
L22 including lists of soldiers serving in the colonial and revolu- 

tionary wars from the Lancastrian towns, Berlin, Bolton, Har- 
vard, Leominster, and Sterling. Lancaster, 1889. 

974.42 Temple, J. H« History of the town of Whately, Mass., includ- 
W55 ing.. .events from the 1st planting of Hatfield, 1660-1871... 

Bost., 1872. French and Indian, p. 136-7. Revolution, p. 141-9. Civil war, 
p. 163-8. 

974.42 [Temple, J. H.] History of the town of Whately, Mass., 

Wool including... events from the 1st planting of Hatfield, 1660- 

1899, as rev.. .by J. M. Crafts... Orange, 1899. French and 

Indian, p. 211-12. Revolution, p. 216-26. War of 1812, p. 238, 240. Civil war, 
p. 242-7. 

974.45 Chase, G: W. History of Haverhill, Mass...l640 to...l860. 

H291 Haverhill, 1861. Haverhill men in the revolution, several lists, p. 382-420. 

974.45 Haverhill (Mass.). Foundation facts concerning its settlement, 
H295 growth, industries, societies... Haverhill, 1879. Haverhill heroes 

in the rebellion, p. 7-21. 
974.42 Atkins, W : G. History of the town of Hawley, Franklin 
H31 county, Mass. ..1771-1887... West Cummington [Mass.], 1887. 

Rebellion record, p. 23-6. 

974.48 Burr, Fearing, and Lincoln. G : ed. Town of Hingham in 

H593 the late civil war... [Bost.,] 1876. Contains several lists. 

974.48 Hingham (Mass.) History of the town... 8 vols. Bingham, 
H592 1893. French and Indian war, short liatf, rol. 1, p. 265-68. Revolutionary 

lists, p. 277-329. War of 1812, p. 333-5. Civil war, p. 841-68. Regular Army, 
p. 374. 

974.48 Lincoln, Solomon. Address ...before the citizens of.. .Hingham 

H591 Mass,,.. .Sept. 28, 1835. Military services in the Indian, French and 

Indian and revolutionary wars, p. 48-54. Pensioners iu 1818, p. 54-5. 



12 Lists of New England Soldiers [Jan. 

974.47 Pattce, W: S. History of old Braintree and Quincy, with a 
B732 sketch of Randolph and Holbrook. Quincy, 1878. French and 

Indian war, p. 373-7. Revolution, p. 403-22. War of*1812, p. 449. Civil war, 

p. 440-7. 

974.43 Estes, D. F. History of Holden, Mass., 1684-1894. Worces- 

H711 ter, 1894. Revolutionary rolls, p. 162-6. Civil war, soldiers from Holden 

or serving in the quota of Holden, p. 174-91. 

974.43 StOWe, J : HI, History of the town of Hubbardston, Worcester 

H86 COUnty, Mass... Hubbardston, 1881. Revolutionary soldiers, p. 52. 

Hubbardston in the war of tbe rebellion, p. 138-45. 

974.47 Hyde Park (MaSS,). ..Memorial sketch of. ..Hyde Park, Mass... 

H99 Bost., 1888. Civil war list, p. 70-2. 

974.45 Waters, T: F, Ipswich in the Mass. Bay colony... Ipswich, 

Ip68 1905. Soldiers of King Philip's war, p. 218-24. 

974.43 Marvin. A, P. History of the Town of Lancaster, Mass... 

L221 Lancaster, 1879. French and Indian war, short lists, p. 252-63. Revolu- 

tion, short lists, p. 290-314, Civil war roll of honor, p. 702-12. 

974.43 Nourse, H: S. Lancastriana, 1 : a supplement to the early rec- 
L226 ords and military annals of Lancaster, Mass. Lancaster, 1900. 

Rolls of Capt. Eage/'s company, 1777, p. 38-9. 

974.43 Notirse. II : S. Military annals of Lancaster, Mass., 1 740-1 865, 
L22 including lists of soldiers serving in the colonial and revolution- 

ary wars from the Lancastrian towns, Berlin, Bolton, Harvard, 
Leominster, and Sterling. Lancaster, 1889. 

973.3444 Washburn. Emory. Address commemorative of the part taken 
W27 by... Leicester in the... re volution... Bost., 1849. Roils of the 

Washburn, Newhall, Mason, and Moore companies who marched on the alarm of 
Apr. 19, 1775, p. 45-8. 

974.43 Washburn, Emory. Historical sketches of the town of Leices- 

L531 ter, Mass... Bost., 1860. Soldiers engaged in service in the war of the 

revolution, p. 215-21. 

974.41 Palmer, C: J. History of Lenox and Richmond. Pittsfield 

L54 [Mass.], 1 904. Soldiers in the revolutionary and civil wars, p. 34-8. 

974.43 Fitchblirg historical Society. Proceedings and papers relat- 
F551 ing to the history of the town... 3 vols. Fitchburg, 1895. 

Revolutionary rolls of Fitchburg, Lunenburg, and Leominster, vol. I, p. 117-33. 

974.43 Nourse, H : S, Military annals of Lancaster, Mass., 1740-1865, 
L22 including lists of soldiers serving in the colonial and revolu- 
tionary wars from the Lancastrian towns, Berlin, Bolton, Har- 
vard, Leominster, and Sterling. Lancaster, 1889. 

974.42 Smith, J: M. ed. History of the town of Sunderland, Mass., 
Su7 which originally embraced... the present towns of Montague and 

Leverett... Greenfield [Mass.], 1899. Sunderland in the revolu- 
tion, p. 142-3. Civil war, p. 147-8. 

974.44 Hudson. C : History of the town of Lexington, Middlesex 

qL59 COUnty, Mass... Bost., 1868. French and Indian, p. 378-80. Revolu- 

tion, p. 383-92. Civil war, p. 396-401. 

974.44 Shattlirk, Lemuel, History of the town of Concord, Middle- 
C742 sex county, Mass... to 1832, and of the adjoining towns, Bed- 

ford, Acton, Lincoln, Carlisle... Bost., 1835. Several lists show- 
ing service in the revolution, p. 352-9. 

974.44 Courier-Citizen Company, pub. Illustrated history of Low- 
qL95 ell and vicinity... Lowell [Mass.], 1897. Revolutionary lists, not 

limited to Lowell, p. 136-42. 



1911] 



Lists of New England Soldiers 



13 



974.44 Cowley, C: Illustrated history of Lowell. Bost., 1868. Na- 

L954 val officers, army officers and soldiers who died in service during the civil war, 

p. 226-35. 

974.44 New England agricultural [society]. Handbook of the New 
L953 England agricultural fair of 1871, with Charles Cowley's His- 
tory of Lowell. Lowell, 1871. Naval officers, army officers, and sol- 
diers who died in service during the civil war, p. 226-35. 

974.42 Noon, Alfred, comp. Ludlow; a century and a centennial... 
L96 Springfield, 1875. Soldiers of the civil war, p. 90-1. 

974.43 Fitchburg historical Society. Proceedings and papers relat- 
F551 ing to the history of the town... 3 vols. Fitchburg, 1895. 

Revolutionary rolls of Fitchburg, Lunenburg, and Leominster, vol. 1, p. 117-33. 

974.45 Lewis. Alonzo, and JVewhall. J. R. History of Lynn, Essex 
L991 county, Mass., including Lynnfield, Saugus, Swampscott, and 

Nahant. Bost., 1865. Lynn soldiers of the revolution, p. 579-80. 

974.44 Corey, D. P. History of Maiden, Mass., 1633-1785. Maiden, 

M292 1899. Minute mm of Maiden, 1775, p. 744. Soldiers and sailors of the revo- 

lution (much military biog.), p. 806-32. 

974.44 Maiden (Kass.). Memorial of the celebration of the 250th 
M293 anniversary of the incorporation of the town, May, 1899. 

Cambridge, 1900. Graves of revolutionary soldiers, p. 324-5. 

974.45 Lamson. D. F. History of the town of Manchester, Essex 

M311 county, Mass., 1645-1895. [Manchester, 1895?] Military ser- 

vice in the Indian wars, revolution, war of 1812, and civil war, p. 289-301. 

974.45 Roads, S : Jr. History and traditions of Marblehead. Bost., 

M32 1881 . Revolutionary prisoners of war in Mill prison, p. 104-07. Marblehead 

roll of honor, civil war, p. 407-11. 

974.48 Matfapoisett (Mass.), Mattapoisett and Old Rochester, Mass., 

M42 being a history of these towns and also, in part, of Marion and 

a portion of Wareham. N. Y., 1907. Rochester soldiers and sailora 
in the early wars, 1754-1812, p. 349-59. 

974.44 Hudson, C : History of the town of Marlborough, Middlesex 
M34 county, Mass. .1657- 1861, with a brief sketch. ..of Northbor- 

OUgh... Bost., 1862. French and Indian war, p. 136-41. Revolution, p. 
16»-74. Civil war, p. 272-7. 

974.48 IMattapoiSftt (Mass.). Mattapoisett and Old Rochester, Mass., 
M42 being a history of these towns and also, in part, of Marion and 

a portion of Wareham. N. Y., 1907. Rochester soldiers and sailors 
in the early wars, 1754-1812, p. 349-59. 

974.44 Hudson. A. S. Annals of Sudbury, Wayland, and Maynard, 

qSu2 Middlesex county, Mass. n. p. 1891. Roll of honor for the French 

and Indian, revolutionary, and civil wars, p. 149-54. 

974.47 Tild^n, W : S. History of the town of Medfield, Mass., 1650- 

M46 1886. Bost., 1887. French and Indian war, p. 146-7. Revolution, p. 

178-81. Civil war, p. 253, 255, 258. 

974.44 Brooks, € : History of the town of Medford, Middlesex county, 

M46 Mass... Bost., 1855. Capt. Isaac Hall's company, 1775, p. 187. 

974.44 Brooks, C : History of the town of Medford, Middlesex county, 
M461 Mass. .rev. and enl. by J. M. Usher. Bost., 1886. Capt. Isaac 

Hall's company, 1775, p. 178. Medford men in union armies, p. 213—19. 

974.3444 Wild, II. T, Medford in the revolution... Medford, 1903. 

W64 Soldierg and sailors credited to Medford, also soldiers residing in Medford before 

and after the war, p. 28—55, 65—7. 



14 



Lists of New England Soldiers 



[Jan. 



974.44 
M492 

974.44 
M491 

974.43 
M52 

974.45 
M56 

974.44 
qD78 

974.44 
qH93 

974.43 

Su8 



Drake, S. A. ed. 

vols. Bost., 1880. 

Hunl, D. H. comp. 
vols. Phil., 1890. 



974.47 Jameson, E. 0. ed. History of Medway, Mass., 1713—1885. 

qM47 [Medway, 1885 ?] Inhabitant soldiers of the French and Indian war, p. 

212—13. Short revolutionary lists, p. 215—31. Civil war, p. 244—51. 

353.97446[ Jameson, E. 0. ed.] Military history of Medway, Mass., 

qJ23 1745 — 1885, containing the names of the inhabitant soldiers 

in the French and Indian wars... continental soldiers...in the... 

revolution, a mention of the war of 1812 [and] ... a record...of 

the union soldiers... [Providence, 1886.] Various lists. 

GOSS, E. H: History of Melrose, county of Middlesex, Mass. 

Melrose, 1902. Revolutionary soldiers, p. 211— 15. Alphabetical roll of 
Melrose citizen soldiers in the civil war, p. 238—44. 

GOSS, E. H : Melrose memorial : the annals of Melrose, county 
of Middlesex, Mass., in the great rebellion of 1861—65. 

[Bost.,] 1868. Officers and soldiers p. 241— 73. 

Metcalf, J : G. Annals of the town of Mendon [Mass.] from 

1659 — 1880. Providence, R. I., 1880. Mendon in the rebellion' 
p. 660—6. 

Howe, J. S. Historical sketch of the town of Methuen... Me- 

thuen, Mass., 1876. Revolutionary rolls, p. 25— 30. 

History of Middlesex county, Mass. 2 

Military lists under names of towns. 

History of Middlesex county, Mass... 3 
Military lists under names of towns. 

Benedict, W : A. and Tracy, H. A. comp. History of the 

town of Sutton, Mass., from 1704 to 1876, including Grafton 

until 1735, Millbury until 1813, and parts of Northbridge, 

Upton, and Auburn. Worcester, 1878. Lists for French and In- 
dian, revolutionary, and civil wars, p. 778 — 88. 

974.43 Ballon, Adin. History of the town of Milford, Worcester coun- 

M59 ty, Mass... Bost., 1882. War record of the rebellion, p. 722— 88. Con- 

tains biographical matter. 

974.47 Milton (Mass.) History, 1640— 1887...ed. by A. K. Teele. 

M641 [Milton, 1887.] King William's war, p. 411. French and Indian, p. 416. 

Revolution, p. 430—7. Civil war lists, p. 547—64. Patriot soldiers' graves, p. 

471—2. 

974.42 Smith, J : M. ed. History of the town of Sunderland, Mass., 

Su7 which originally embraced... the present towns of Montague 

and Leverett... Greenfield [Mass.], 1899. Sunderland in the 

revolution, p. 142—3. Civil war, p. 147—8- 

974.45 Lewis, Alonzo, and Newhall, J. R. History of Lynn, Essex 
L991 county, Mass., including Lynnfield, Saugus, Swampscott, and 

Nahant. Bost., 1865. Lynn soldiers of the Revolution, p. 579— 80. 

974.48 New Bedford (Mass.) Centennial-historical address of W : W. 
N42 Crapo...and an apx. New Bedford, 1876. Civil war roil of honor, 

p. 137—149. 

974.45 Coffin, Joshua. ...Papers: Newbury, Mass... n. p. [1889?] 

N423 Muster rolls of the French and Indian and revolutionary wars. Reprint from 

Essex Institute collections, vol. 35. 

974.45 Currier, J: J. History of Newbury, Mass... Bost., 1902. 

N424 French and Indian wars, various lists, p. 506—79, 659—60. Revolution, p. 586— 

619. War of 1812, p. 625—306. Civil war, p. 632—6. 

974.45 Currier, J : J. History of Newburyport, Mass., 1764—1905. 
N434 Newburyport, 1906. Revolutionary rolls, p, 546-8, 



1911] Lists of New England Soldiers 15 

974.45 Smith, E. V. History of Newburyport [Mass.]. Newburyport, 

N433 1854. Capt. Perkins' company, 1775, p. 88— 9. 



974.44 

N482 



Jackson, Francis. History of.. .Newton, county of Middlesex, 

Mass., from 1639 to 1800... Bost., 1854. Newton men in the rev- 
olution, p. 200—07. 

974.44 Smith, S. P. History of Newton, Mass...l 630— 1880. Bost., 

N483 1 880. Various revolutionary lists between p. 334 and 383. Civil war soldiers, 

residents of or credited to Newton, p. 631—48. 

974.47 Blird, D. H. ed. History of Norfolk county, Mass... Phil., 

qH93 1884. Military lists under names of towns. 

974.41 Spear, W. F. History of North Adams, Mass., 1749—1885... 
N81 with a roster of commisioned officers in the war of the rebellion. 

North Adams, 1885. Roster, p. 105—07. 

974.45 Bailey, S. L, Historical sketches of Andover (comprising the 
An21 present towns of N. Andover and Andover), Mass. Bost., 

1880. Scattered revolutionary rolls, p. 340—91. 

974.43 Benedict, W: A. and Tracy, H. A. comp. History of the 
Su8 town of Sutton, Mass., from 1704 — 1876, including Grafton 

until 1735, Millbury until 1813, and parts of Northbriclge, Up- 
ton, and Auburn. Worcester, 1878. Lists for French and Indian, 
revolutionary and civil wars, p. 778—88. 

973.7444 North BrOOkOeid (Mass.). Historical record of the soldiers 
qC and sailors of North Brookfield and of others who counted up- 

on the quota of the town in the. ..rebellion... North Brookfield, 

1886. Regimental assignments, p. 43— 8. Names on monument and memo- 
rial tablets, p. 69—71. 

974.43 Temple, J. H. History of North Brookfield, Mass... Brookfield 
N81 records, 1686—1783... North Brookfield, 1887. French and 

Indian, p. 211— 17. Revolution, p. k!27— 43. Civil war, p. 344— 53. 

974.42 Temple, J. H. and Sheldon, G : History of the town of North- 
N82 field, Mass., for 150 years... Albany, 1875. Revolutionary rolls, 

p. 323—7. War of 1812, p. 357—8. Civil war, p. 3(57—9. 

974.44 Eaton, Lilley. Genealogical history of the town of Reading, 
R221 Mass., including the present towns of Wakefield, Reading, and 

North Reading... Bost., 1874. French and Indian wars, p. 697—8. 
Revolution, p. 693—6. 

974.43 Ammidown, Holmes. Historical collections. 2 vols. N. Y., 

Am3 1874. Soldiers of the revolution from Oxford, Mass., vol. 1, p. 201. 

974.43 Daniels, G : F. History of the town of Oxford, Mass... Ox- 

0x21 ford, 1892. French war rolls, p. 120—3. Revolution, p. 134—8. War of 

1812, p. 155—6. Civil war rolls, p. 170—87. 

974.43 Freelaud, HI. de W. comp. Records of Oxford, Mass...from 

0x22 1G30.., Albany, 1894. French and Indian war, p.353-6. Revolution, 

p. 370, 382—90. Oxford in the civil war, p. 405—06, 413—25. 

974.42 Temple, J. H. History of the town of Palmer, Mass... 1716 — 

PI 8 1889... Palmer, 1889. Revolutionary rolls, p. 1(37-96. War of 1812, 

p. 230. War of the rebellion, p. 308—22. 

974.43 Bill, Ledyard. History of Paxton, Mass. Worcester, 1889. 

P281 Civil war list, p. 92-4. 

974.43 Paxton (Mass.). Centenary centennial... June 14, 1865. Wor- 

P28 cester, 1868. Civil war roll of honor, p. 77-8. 

974.42 Parmenter, C: 0. History of Pelham, Mass., from 1738 to 
P36 1898, including the early history of Prescott... Amherst, 1898, 

Pelham in the wars, several lists, p. 34:5—64. 



16 



Lists of New England Soldiers 



[Jan. 



974.41 Smith, J. E. A. History of Pittsfield (Berkshire county), 

P681 Mass...l734— 1876. 2 vols. Bost., 1869. Records of the revolu. 

tion, vol. 1, p. 477—95. Names on civil war monument, vol. 2, p. 629—32. Civil 
war soldiers, vol. 2, p. 695—713. 

974.42 Dyer, C : IV. History of the town of Plainfield, Hampshire 
P691 county, Mass., from its settlement to 1891... Northampton, 

1891. Revolutionary pensioners, p. 80. Soldiers in the war of the rebellion, 

p. 83—8. 

974.48 DaviS, W : T : History of the town of Plymouth... Phil., 1885. 

qP74 Capt. Cobb's company, 1745, p. 81—2. Crown Point expedition, p. 159—60. 

Revolution, p. 88—93. Civil war lists, p. 105 — 17. 

974.42 Parmenter, C: 0. History of Pelham, Mass., from 1738 to 
P36 1898, including the early history of Prescott... Amherst, 1898. 

Pelham in the wars, several lists, p. 343—64. 

973.3444 Blake, F. E. Soldiers of the revolution [Princeton, Mass.]. 

B58 Bost., 1897. Reprint from the town report for 1897. 

974.47 Paftee, W : S. History of Old Braintree and Quincy, with a 
B732 sketch of Randolph and Holbrook. Quinc} r , 1878. French and 

Indian war, p. 373—7. Revolution, p. 4u3— 22. War of 1812, p. 449. Civil war, 
p. 440—7. 

974.44 EatOI), Lllley. Genealogical history of the town of Reading, 
R221 Mass., including the present towns of Wakefield, Reading, and 

North Reading... Bost., 1874. French and Indian wars, p. 697—8. 
Revolution, p. 693—6. 

974.44 Reading (Mass.)* Historical address and poem delivered at the 
R22 bi-centennial celebration of the incorporation of the old town... 

May 29,1844. Bost., 1844. Listof Readiug's revolutionary soldiers, 
p. 108-09. 

974.48 BliSS, Leonard, Jr. History of Rehoboth, Bristol county, 
R26 Mass... comprising the present towns of Rehoboth, Seekonk, 

and Pawtucket...with sketches of Attleborough, Cumberland, 

and a part of Swansey and Barrington. Bost., 1836. Revolu- 
tionary list, p. 149—57. 

974.41 Palmer, C : J. History of Lenox and Richmond. Pittsfield 

L54 fMass.l, 1904. Soldiers in the revolutionary and civil wars, p. 34— 8. 

974.48 Mattapoisett (Mass.). Mattapoisett and Old Rochester, Mass., 
M42 being a history of these towns and also, in part, of Marion and 

a portion of Wareham. N. Y., 1907. Rochester soldiers and sailors 
in the early wars, 1754—1812, p. 349—59. 

974.45 Rockport (Mass.). History of the town, as comprised in the 
R59 centennial address of Lemuel Gott... Rockport, 1888. Civil 

war lists, p. 188—210. 

974.45 Gage, T : History of Rowley, anciently including Bradford, 
R79 Boxford, and Georgetown... Bost., 1840. French war roils, 206—14. 

974.47 Drake, F. S: Town of Roxbury... Roxbury, 1878. Revolu- 

R811 tionary rolls, p. 32— 3. 

974.43 Reed, Jonas. History of Rutland, Worcester county, Mass... 

R93 "Worcester, 1836. Soldiers of the revolution from Rutland, p. 180—2. 

Rutland in the Rebellion, p. 187—90. 

974.43 1879. Same. 

R931 

973.7444 [Hutchinson, T t J. and ChHds, Ralph.] Patriots of Salem; 
Cll roll of honor of the officers and enlisted men during the late 

civil war, from Salem, Mass... Salem, 1877. 



1911] Lists of New England Soldiers 17 

973.89444 Webber, H. E. Greater Salem in the Spanish-American war. 

Jo4 Lynn, Mass., 1901. Rosters and lists chiefly of the 8th Mass. volunteer 

infantry. 

353.97446 Whipple, G : M. History of the Salem light infantry from 

W57 1805 — 1890. Salem, 1890. Original members of Co. H, 19th regi- 

ment Mass. volunteer militia, p. 137—8. Co. A, 50th regiment, 9 months men, 
p. 139—40. Co. A, 7th regiment, p. 143—4. Capt. R. W. Reeves's 13th unattached 
company of infantry, stationed at New Bedford, p. 144—5. 

974.45 Lewis, Alonzo, and Newhall, J. R. History of Lynn, Essex 
L991 county, Mass., including Lynnfield, Saugus, Swampscott and 

Nahant. Bost., 1865. Lynn soldiers of the revolution, p. 579— 80. 

974.48 BliSS, Leonard, Jr. History of Rehoboth, Bristol county, 

R26 Mass... comprising the present towns of Rehoboth, Seekonk, 

and Pawtucket...with sketches of Attleborough, Cumberland, 

and a part of Swansey and Barrington. Bost., 1836. Revoiu- 

tionary list, p. 149—57. 

974.41 Sheffield (Mass.). Centennial celebration of the town of Shef- 
Sh3 field, Berkshire county, Mass., June 18 — 19, 1876... Sheffield, 

1876. Muster rolls of 1776, p. 66—8. 

974.44 Chandler* Seth. History of the town of Shirley, Mass. Shir- 

Sh6 l e Y> 1883. Revolutionary rolls, p. 122 — 5. Shirley men in the rebellion, p. 

137—8. 

974.44 Elliot, C: D. Somerville's history. Somerville [Mass.], 1896. 

E15 Men who died in the civil war, p. 52—3. 

973.7444 SouthborOUgh (Mass.). Record of the soldiers of Southborough 
C12 during the rebellion from 1861 — 66... Marlborough, 1867. 

Citizens of Southborough and vicinity who volunteered under the various calls 
of the president, p. 74—88. 

974.43 Ammidown, Holmes. Historical collections. 2 vols. N. Y., 

Am 3 1874. Southbridge in the war of the rebellion, vol. 2, p. 461—73. 

974.43 Davis, G : Historical sketch of Sturbridge and Southbridge. 

St9 West Brookfield, 1856. Names of men who were in the revolution and 

French wars from Sturbridge, p. 113—14. 

974.43 Draper, James. History of Spencer, Mass.. .to 1860, including 
Sp3 a brief sketch of Leicester to.. .1753. Ed. 2. Worcester, n. d. 

Revolutionary pensioners, p. 155—6. 

974.42 Green, M. A. Springfield 1636—1886, history of town and 

Sp8 city...fSpringfield] 1888. Revolutionary lists, p. 282—92. Losses in the 

civil war, p. 535—9. 

974.43 IVourse, H : S. Military annals of Lancaster, Mass., 1740—1865, 
L22 including lists of soldiers serving in the colonial and revolu- 
tionary wars from the Lancastrian towns, Berlin, Bolton, Har- 
vard, Leominster, and Sterling. Lancaster, 1899. 

974.43 Ammidown, Holmes. Historical collections. 2 vols. N. Y., 

Am3 1874. Sturbridge soldiers in the war of the revolution, vol. 2, p. 45—6. 

974.43 Davis, G: Historical sketch of Sturbridge and Southbridge. 

St9 West Brookfield, 1856. Names of the men who were in the revolution 

and French wars from Sturbridge, p. 113—14. 

974.44 Hudson, A. S. History of Sudbury, Mass., 1638—1889. Sud- 

Su2 bury, 1889. French and Indian war, p. 337-44. Revolution, p. 366-72, 

384—409. Civil war, p. 540—55. 

974.44 HudSOD, A. S. Annals of Sudbury, Wayland, and Maynard, 
qSu2 Middlesex county, Mass. n. p. 1891. Roll of honor for the French 

and Indian, revolutionary, and civil wars, p. 149—54. 



18 



Lists of New England Soldiers 



[Jan. 



974.45 
L991 

974.44 
T66 

974.43 

Su8 



974.42 Smith, J: M. ed. History of the town of Sunderland, Mass., 
Su7 which originally embraced... the present towns of Montague and 

Leverett... Greenfield [Mass.], 1899. Sunderland in the revolu- 
tion, p. 142—3. Civil war, p. 147—8. 

974.43 Benedict, W: A. and Tracy, H. A. comp. History of the 
Su8 town of Sutton, Mass., from 1704 to 1876, including Grafton 

until 1735, Millbury until 1813, and parts of Northbridge, 
Upton, and Auburn. Worcester, 1878. Lists for French and in- 

dian, revolutionary, and civil wars, p. 778—88. 

Lewis, AlOHZO, and Newliall, J. R. History of Lynn, Essex 
county, Mass., including Lynnfield, Saugus, Swampscott, and 

Nahant. Bost., 1865. Lynn soldiers of the revolution, p. 579— 80. 

Sawteile, I. B. History of the town of Townsend...l676— 

1878. Fitchburg, 1878. Revolutionary rolls and lists, p. 178—209. Ci- 
vil war, p. 264—82. 

Benedict, W : A. and Tracy, H. A. comp. History of the 

town of Sutton, Mass., from 1704 — 1876, including Grafton 
until 1735, Millbury until 1813, ar-i parts of Northbridge, 
Upton, and Auburn. Worcester, 1878. Lists for French and in- 

dian, revolutionary, and civil wars, p. 778—88. 

974.43 Ciiapin, H: Address delivered at the Unitarian church in Ux- 
Uxl bridge, Mass., in 1864... Worcester, 1881. Civil war soldiers who 

enlisted as residents of Uxbridge, p. 208—11. 

974.44 Eaton, LiSley. Genealogical history of the town of Reading, 
R221 Mass., including the present towns of Wakefield, Reading, and 

North Reading... Bost., 1874. French and Indian wars, p. 697— 8. 
Revolution, p. 693—6. 

974.42 Gardner, Aosalom. An address delivered in Wales, Oct. 5, 
W14 1862... [with a list] of soldiers who served.. .in the. ..civil war. 

Springfield, 1866. List, p. 42— 4. 

974.47 Lewis, I. IV. History of Walpole, Mass...Walpole, 1905. Revo- 

Wi a lutionary rolls, p. 120—32. War of 1812, p. 158—9. Civil war roll of honor, p. 

TT u 162—6. 

974.48 Mattapoisett (Mass.) Mattapoisett and Old Rochester, Mass., 
M42 being a history of these towns and also, in part, of Marion and 

a portion of Wareham. N. Y., 1907. Rochester soldiers and sail- 
ors in the early wars, 1754—1812, p. 349—59. 

974.42 Biake, Jonathan* History of the town of Warwick, Mass... 

W26 Bost., 1873. Civil war soldiers, p. 189—90. 

974.44 Hudson. A. S. Annals of Sudbury, Wayland and Maynard, 
qSu2 Middlesex COUnty, Mass. n. p. 1891. Roll of honor for the French 

and Indian, revolutionary, and civil wars, p. 149—54. 

974.43 De Forest, H. P. and Bates, E : C. History of Westborough, 

W531 Mass. Westborough, 1891. Capt. Brigham's minute company enlisted 

in the service of the United colonies, 1775, p. 163—4. Civil war lists, p. 251—329. 

974.44 Hodgllian. E. R. History of the town of Westford in the county 
W51 of Middlesex, Mass., 1652—1883. Lowell, 1883. Alphabetical 

list of soldiers in the revolution, p. 137—9. War of the rebellion, p. 194—200. 
Casualties and roll of honor, p. 210—12. 

974.43 Heywood. W : S. History of Westminster, Mass...l728— 1893... 

W542 Lowell, 1893. French and Indian, p. 102. Westminster men known to 

have been in the revolution, and a list of pensioners in 1840, p. 177—9. Civil war 
soldiers, p. 423. 

974.44 Fiske, € : II. Oration delivered before the inhabitants of Wes- 

W52 ton. ..July 4, 1876. Weston, 1876. Capt. Lamson's company, Apr. 

19, 1775, p. 32. Capt. Fiske's company in service 1776, p. 34. 



1911] Lists of New England Soldiers 19 

974.47 Weymouth historical society. Historical sketch of the town 
qW54 of Weymouth, Mass., 1622—1884, comp. by Gilbert Nash. 

Weymouth, 1885. Soldiers' record in the civil war, p. 227—43. 

974.42 Temple, J. H. History of the town of Whately, Mass., includ- 
W55 ing...events from the 1st planting of Hatfield, 1660—1871... 

Bost., 1872. French and Indian war, p. 136— 7. Revolution, p. 141— 9. Civil 
war, p. 163—8. 

974.42 [Temple, J. H.] History of the town of Whately, Mass., in- 
W551 eluding... events from the 1st planting of Hatfield, 1660 — 1899. 

as rev.. .by J. M. Crafts... Orange, 1899. French and Indian war, 
p. 211— 12. Revolution, p. 216-26. War of 1812, p. 238, 240. Civil war, p. 242— 7. 

974.42 StebbiDS, R. P. Historical address delivered at...Wilbraham, 

W64 [Mass.], June 15, 1863... Bost., 1864. Revolutionary rolls and pen. 

sioners, p. 233—44. War of 1812, p. 246. 

974.41 Perry, A. L. Williamstown and Williams college. [Norwood, 

W672 Mass.], 1899. Muster roll of Arnold's company against Quebec, p. 39—40. 

974.43 Marvin, A. Ft M History of the town of Winchendon (Worces- 

W72 ter COUnty, Mass.). ..Winchendon, 1868. Winchendon men in the 

revolution, p. 102—03. Civil war men who entered from this town, p. 508—18. 

974.44 [Whitney, A. E. and Littlefield, ft: S. ed.] July 4, 1890: 
qW72 250th anniversary of the 1st white settlement within the territo- 
ry Of Winchester [Mass.]. ..[Bost., 1890?] Soldiers of French and 
Indian, and of the revolutionary wars who lived within the present bounds of 
Winchester, p. 129. 

974.44 Sewall, S : History of Woburn, Middlesex county, Mass.. .Bost., 

qW81 1868. Woburn men in the revolutionary war, p. 568—78. 

974.43 Ammidown, Holmes. Historical collections. 2 vols. N. Y., 

Am3 18/4. Capt. Israel Putnam's company in garrison at Fort Edward, chiefly 

from Woodstock, Mass. [Conn.], vol. 1, p. 395—6. 

973.3444 Dodge, M. C. comp. List of the soldiers in the war of the 

D66 revolution from Worcester, Mass., with a record of their death 

and place of burial. ..Worcester, 1902. 

974.43 Lovell, A. A. Worcester in the war of the re volution... Worces- 
qW894 ter, 1876. Roils, p. 119-25. 

974.43 Marvin, A. P. History of Worcester in the rebellion. Wor- 

W8913 cester, 1870. List of officers and men, p. 519—78. 

973.89444 Roe, A. S. Worcester in the Spanish-American war.. .with a 
qJ02 roster of E. R. Shumway camp, No. 30, Spanish war veterans... 

Worcester, 1 905. Roster, p. 317—22. 

974.43 History of Worcester county, Mass.... 2 vols. Bost., 1879. 

qH62 Contains military lists under the names of the towns. 

974.43 Hurd, D. H. History of Worcester county, Mass... Phil., 1889. 

qH93 Military lists under names of towns. 

974.42 History Of the town Of Worthinffton from its first settlement 

W89 to 1874. Springfield, 1874. Soldiers of the revolution and war of 1812, 

p. 22—23. Civil war, p. 77—81. 

974.42 [Rice, J. t\] Secular and ecclesiastical history of the town of 

W891 Worthington... Albany, 1853. Soldiers of the revolution and the war 

of 1812, p. 24—5. 

[To be concluded] 

VOL. LXV. 2 



20 



Emigrants from England 



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21 



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23 



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1911] 



Emigrants from England 



25 



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VOL. LXV. 



36 Descendants of Edward Downes [Jan. 



EDWARD DOWNES OF DORCHESTER, MASS., AND HIS 

DESCENDANTS 

Compiled by W. E. D. Downes, Ph.D., of Farmington, Me. 
[Concluded from Vol. 64, p. 373] 

6. Am as A 3 Downs (Edward? Edward 1 ), born at Stoughton, Mass., 31 
July 1784, died at Cameron, N. Y., 2 Mar. 1833. 

He married first at Francestown, N. H., 13 Feb. 1810, Mary 
Batten, daughter of Richard and Mary (Rand), born 29 May 
1788, died at Francestown 22 Aug. 1817 ; and secondly at Frances- 
town, 7 Oct. 1823, Fanny Boyd, daughter of Nathaniel and Molly 
(Ramsey), born there 13 June 1797, died at Sabetha, Kans., 28 
Apr. 1873. 

Children by first wife, born at Francestown, N. H. : 

i. Rhoda Billings, 4 b. 17 Mar. 1811 ; d. at Sharon, Wis., 30 Apr. 1861 ; 

m. at Cameron, 4 Dec. 1828, Peter Truax, b. at Albany (?),N. Y., 

7 Jan. 1806, d. at Sharon 22 Dec. 1886. Children, b. at Cameron: 

1. M. Caroline, b. 2 Nov. 1829. 2. Amasa Downs, b. 1 Feb. 1832. 

3. John Clinton, b. 2 Aug. 1834. 4. Emily Jane, b. 27 July 1837. 

5. Fanny Maria, b. 6 Aug. 1840. 6. Henry Franklin, b. 26 Nov. 

1843. 7. William Boyd, b. 13 Dec. 1846. 8. Julia Ann, b. 19 Aug. 

1850. 
ii. Mary Rand, b. 2 Dec. 1813 ; d. unm. 9 Dec. 1843. 
iii. Amasa, b. 12 Aug. 1816; d. at Fruitport, Mich., 1 Aug. 1872; m. at 

Buffalo, N. Y., Catherine Wilcox, who m. (2) Jonathan Holmes 

and lived at Delavan, Wis. He was a cabinet maker and left no 

issue. 

Children by second wife, born at Cameron, N. Y. : 

iv. Jane Ramsay, b. 11 Aug. 1824; d. at Cameron, 19 Feb. 1851; m. 1 
Jan. 1844, Wickham Richard Crocker, son of James Hooper 
and Sarah (Snelgrove), b. at Bath, Eng., 5 June 1810, d. at Came- 
ron 6 Jan. 1875. Children: 1. Caroline, b. 15 Dec. 1844. 2. Fan- 
ny Downs, b. 8 Jan. 1847. 3. Wickham Bichard, b. 26 Aug. 1849. 

v. John, b. 27 Sept. 1825; d. at Sabetha, Kans., 9 Aug. 1890; m. at 
Cameron, 4 Mar. 1849, Hannah Maria Hare, dau. of Henry and 
Nancy (Stary), b. in Cayuga Co., N. Y., 16 Feb. 1826, living in 
California in 1900. Children: 1. Amasa. b 2. Fanny Louise. 

vi. Fannie Louisa, b. 7 Aug. 1827 ; d. at Cameron 19 Oct. 1846. 

vii. Levi, b. 13 Dec. 1828 ; d. 26 Jan. 1830. 

7. Edward 3 Downes (Edward, 2 Edward 1 ), born at Stoughton, Mass., 
1 May 1795, died at Francestown, N. H., 19 Oct. 1881, was a tan- 
ner and manufacturer. 

He married, 25 Nov. 1819, Mary Dennis, daughter of Samuel 
and Mary (Griffin), born at Gloucester, Mass., 1 Aug. 1799, died at 
Francestown 24 Oct. 1866. 

Children, born at Francestown : 

i. Mary Frances, 4 b. 3 Nov. 1820; d. at Lawrence, Mass., 27 July 
1868; m. 31 July 1842, Daniel Thissell, son of Daniel and Pru- 
dence Gale (Varnum) of Dracut, Mass., b. 14 Feb. 1821. Chil- 
dren: 1. Maryetta, b. 1 Sept. 1843. 2. Harriet Varnum, b. 19 
Nov. 1847. 

ii. Rhoda Billings, b. 9 Nov. 1822 ; m. 28 Oct. 1856, Charles Parker, 
son of Jonathan and Hannah (Clark) of Chelmsford, Mass., b. 16 
Sept. 1816 ; lives at Francestown. 



1911] Descendants of Edward Downes 37 

iii. Mark, b. 1 Nov. 1824 ; m. at Exeter, N. H., 8 Sept. 1852, Mary Dow 
Dyer, dau. of John and Hannah, b. at Epsom, N. H., 20 Aug. 
1832; a bookkeeper at Woburn, Mass. Children: 1. Frederick 
Milton Dyer. b 2. Abbie Maria. 

iv. Samuel Dennis, b. 25 Apr. 1827; m. at South Deerfield, Mass., 26 
Mar. 1851, Martha Theresa Billings, dau. of Timothy and Amy 
(Dwelly) , b. there 13 Feb. 1825 ; treasurer of a bank at Frances- 
town. Child : William Edward* 

v. Harriet Maria, b. 30 Sept. 1828 ; d. at Francestown 3 June 1853. 

vi. George Edward, b. 27 Jan. 1830; m. 25 Oct. 1860, Harriet Fran- 
ces Carter, dau. of Willard and Sarah (Patterson), b. at Fran- 
cestown 7 Mar. 1830; d. 9 June 1888; no issue. 

vii. Cynthia Fairbanks, b. 18 Sept. 1831; m. 27 Sept. 1854, Andrew 
Austin Ward, son of Samuel and Sally (Shedd) of Cambridge, 
Mass., b. 17 July 1831. Children: 1. Edward Austin. 2. Jennie. 
3. Alice Gertrude. 

yiii. Nancy Jane, b. 24 Nov. 1832; d. 12 Sept. 1858. 

ix. Amasa, b. 29 Dec. 1833 ; m. 1 Feb. 1866, Susan Maria Sawyer, dau. 
of William Reed and Abby (Stevens), b. at Francestown 10 Jan. 
1842 ; a merchant there ; served three years in the 13th N. H. Volun- 
teers. Children: 1. Charles Sawyer. b 2. Mary Abby. 3. Bertha 
Maria. 

x. Henrietta AuGUSTA,b. 25 Oct. 1835 ; a missionary in New York City. 

xi. Eliza Bixby, b. 29 Nov. 1837 ; d. 17 May 1862 ; m. 4 Sept. 1860, John 
Epps, son of Nehemiah and Eliza (Farrington) , b. 31 Aug. 1837, 
who m. (2) Dec. 1862, Marcia Crane of Contoocook, N. H. Child : 
Frank P. 

xii. Harlan Page, b. 16 Feb. 1841; m. 9 Aug. 1862, Maria Ann Ste- 
vens, dau. of Samuel and Mary (Lolly), b. 19 June 1837 ; a builder 
at Francestown. Children: 1. Eliza Jane. b 2. Charles Frank. 
3 Edward Dennis. 4. Mabel Cynthia. 5. Grace Edith. 6. Annie 
Augusta. 7. Adelaide Woodbury. 8. Came Maria. 9. Martha 
Theresa. 10. Elsie Beatrice. 

8. John 4 Downes (/esse, 3 Edward, 2 Edward 1 ), born at Stoughton, 
Mass., 23 Dec. 1784, was midshipman, U. S. N., 1 June 1802, 
lieutenant 6 Mar. 1807, commander 24 June 1813, and captain 5 
Mar. 1817. Although called commodore, this must have been 
through courtesy, for his highest official rank was that of captain. 
He served on the frigate New York, and distinguished himself in 
the attack on Tripoli, 6 May 1807 ; commanded the Macedonian in 
the Pacific in 1819, and the Java in the Mediterranean in 1828-9 ; 
as commander of the squadron of the Pacific he punished the natives 
of Quallah Battoo, 5 Feb. 1832, for outrages on American seamen ; 
was in command at the Charlestown Navy Yard from 16 Mar. 1835 
to 31 May 1842, and again from Mar. 1849 to May 1852, says the 
Memorial History of Boston, which gives his autograph (vol. 3, p. 
352). In 1847-8 he was again in command in the Pacific. He 
died 11 Aug. 1854, and is buried in Mt. Auburn Cemetery, Cam- 
bridge, Mass. 

He married at Upper Red Hook, N. Y., 30 Oct. 1821, Maria 
Gertrude Hoffman, daughter of Harmanus and Catherine (Ver- 
planck), born at Red Rock, 28 Oct. 1798, died 22 Feb. 1877. 

Children : 

L JoiiN, 5 b. 25 Aug. 1822; d. at New Orleans, La., 21 Sept. 1865; m. 
Frances Hakkod Foster, who d. 26 Nov. 1896. He was midship- 
man, U.S.N. , 4 Sept. 1837; passed midshipman 29 June 1843 ; mas- 
ter 26 Feb. 1851; lieutenant 30 Aug. 1851; commander 16 July 
1862 ; commanded the gunboat Huron and the monitor Nahant in 
the Civil War. Children: 1. Frances Harrod.* 2. John. 3. Frank 



38 Descendants of Edward Dowries [Jan. 

Foster. 4. Adele Bushton. 5. Philip Ho f man. 6. Mary Camp- 
bell. 

ii. Julia Maria, b. 24 Feb. 1824; d. 24 Oct. 1865; m. 15 Dec. 1842, 
Commodore John S. Missroon, U.S.N., who d. 23 Oct. 1865. 
Children : 1. Gertrude. 2. Julia Emily. 3. Frank Dupont. 4. 
Mary Alice. 5. John Downes. 6. Effie Verplanck. 7. Herman 
Hoffman. 8. Martha Louise. 

iii. Chakles Albert, b. 19 Feb. 1826 ; d. unm. 24 Jan. 1875 ; served as 
acting assistant paymaster, U.S.N., 5 Mar. 1862 to 18 Apr. 1867. 

iv. Henry Hill, b. 20 June 1828 ; d. 9 Nov. 1829. 

v. Henry Hill, b. at Boston 24 Nov. 1830 ; d. at Vicksburg, Miss., 26 
Sept. 1864; A.B., Harvard 1852; LL.B. 1854; private in 124th Il- 
linois Volunteers 11 Aug. 1862. His name, misspelled Downs, is 
among those on the walls of Memorial Hall, Cambridge. 

9. Albert Edward 4 Downes (Jesse, 8 Edward, 2 Edward 1 ), born at 
Stoughton, Mass., 13 Nov. 1805, was lost in the Grampus Mar. 
1843. He was a midshipman, U.S.N., 1 Jan. 1818 ; and lieutenant 
3 Mar. 1827. 

He married at Charlestown, Mass., 11 Oct. 1836, Martha Lith- 
gow Devens, daughter of Richard and Jane Caroline (Lithgow), 
born at Charlestown 15 Aug. 1816, died 23 May 1900. 
Children : 

i. Caroline Lithgow, 6 b. 11 Sept. 1837; lives at Washington, D. C. 
ii. Maria Gertrude, b. 8 Feb. 1840 ; d. at Charlestown, 30 Dec. 1890. 

10. Joseph Fenno 4 Downes (Oliver, 8 Edward 2 Edward 1 ), born at 

Stoughton, Mass., 19 Mar. 1788, died 14 Sept. 1863, was an auc- 
tioneer and real estate agent at Canton, Mass. 

He married at Canton, 2 July 1811, Eliza Carrol, daughter of 
Samuel and Millie (Blackman), born 26 Jan. 1793, died 19 May 
1875. 

Children : 

i. Samuel Carrol, 5 b. 12 Dec. 1811 ; d. 15 Mar. 1887 ; m. (1) at Ded- 
ham, Mass., 5 June 1846 (int. rec. at Canton 6 June — sic), Han- 
nah Farrington, dau. of Jesse and Rebecca (Metcalf), b. 30 Apr. 
1817, d. 27 June 1862; m. (2) 19 Apr. 1876, Olive Anna Hunt, 
dau. of Elijah Minot and Olive (Butler), b. 25 Sept. 1847. No 
issue. 

ii. Eliza, d. young. 

iii. Milla Ann, b. at Canton 1 Jan. 1815; d. 15 May 1898; m. 5 Apr. 
1838, Peter Adams Wales, son of Ephraim and Mary (Alden), b. 
at Randolph, Mass., 30 Apr. 1813, d. 6 Apr. 1881. Children: 1. 
James Henry (twin), b. 26 Dec. 1838. 2. Henry James (twin), b. 
26 Dec. 1838. 3. Eliza Downes, b. 19 Jan. 1841. 

11. George 4 Downes (Oliver, 8 Edward, 2 Edward 1 ), born at Stoughton, 

Mass., 3 Sept. 1790, died 7 Feb. 1861, was a grocer and farmer at 
Canton, Mass. 

He married at Canton, 1 Dec. 1831, Caroline Tucker, daugh- 
ter of Lemuel and Polly (Upham), born 15 July 1806, died 13 Dec. 
1892. 

Children : 

i. George Edward,* b. 6 Sept. 1833; d. unm. 27 Aug. 1887; a salt 

merchant, 
ii. Caroline Tucker, b. 17 Oct. 1839 ; d. 14 Sept. 1898. 

12. William 4 Downes (Oliver 8 , Edward, 2 Edward 1 ), born at Canton, 

Mass., 16 Nov. 1805, died 25 Dec. 1845, was a farmer at Canton. 



1911] Foxborough, Mass,, Warnings 39 

He married there, 13 Nov. 1828, Mary Hale Spatjlding, daugh- 
ter of David and Sarah Esthmer (Kingsbury), born at Townsend, 
Mass., 30 July 1807, died at Lowell, Mass., 18 Nov. 1881. She 
married secondly, 20 Oct. 1847, Joshua M. Hadley of Lowell. 

Child : 

i. George Oliver, 5 b. 17 Oct. 1830; d. 28 Nov. 1899 ; m. 27 Dec. 1853, 
Adeline Eliza Peterson, dau. of William Henry and Nancy 
Brown (Roberts), b. at Canton 1 Sept. 1834; a farmer there. 
Children: 1. William Fenno. 6 2. Mary Eliza. 3. Harvey. 4. 
Lucy Ellen. 5. Amy Adeline. 6. Georgie Ellen. 7. Walter Percy . 



FOXBOROUGH, MASS., WARNINGS, ETC. 

Communicated by Robert W. Carpenter, of Foxborough 

Copied from a book in the possession of the Town Clerk of Fox- 
borough, entitled : <r In the year of our Lord 1778 | the Town Book 
For Recording the Transactions of Town Meetings & also For 
Recording person taken into Town | A " : 

Elizabeth Tapper Came to Live in Town at M r Dunbars in Jan y 1779 
Samuel Balkcom & wife Sarah Cam from attleboro' their Children names 

John Sarah Samuel otis & molly- 
Ben jamin Tilson & wife Came From Taunton thier Children names Holmes 

Rhoda Elisha 
Samuel Frost & wife & Child from wrentham 
Elijah Morse & wife from Stoughtonham 
Ebineze waran & wife & Children From Roxbury 
Eliazer Fisher & wife & Children From Mansfield 
Ralf Braman & wife & Children from Bellingham 
Nathan Kingsbury & wife & Children from wrentham 
Samuel wite & wife & Children From wrentham 
amariah Marsh & wife & Children From Holliston 
george adams & wife & Children From Franklin thiar Children names 

Dirius Experience Peter 
Deliverence Forrington From walpole 

y e above persons all Came in here within y e bounds of town sence y e 
petision put in to y e Court for a Town ship ; on which petision y e town 
was incorporated & before febury 1779 
taken in to my house on march 23 1779 the widdow Esther Cook one of 

the poor of the town of franklin Nathan Kingsbury 
Taken in to my house on August y e 23 1777 John Failes & Mary failes 

his wife & 3 Child Named danal & Charls & Sally from wrentham 

Josoph Field 
Came in to this Town in y e year 1779 
James smith From walpole & his wife & Children 
david wilkesoD & wife from walpole & Children 

pt in this book by order of y e selectmen Swift puvson Town C k 

[42] 

A Record of persons belonging to other Towns & Resident in this Town 



40 Foxborough, Mass., Warnings [Jan. 

Viz David Forrist & wife & Children from Stoujrhton their childrens names 

David Azubah & Experience 
James Freeman from Atleborough 

Hannah Chapman & Daughter of the Same Name from Boston 
Jabez Grover & wife & children from Mansfield 
Sep r 15 th 1783 Ichabod Todd & Leona his wife Last from Mansfield 
Sep 1 " 1783 Elizabeth Morey & Son Ralph Morey from Norton 
April y e 4 th 1783 Isaac Richardson and Rebekah his wife & Children 

whose names are Isaac Unice Lois & Olive 
Jonathan Lane and wife Sarah and Children (viz) Levi Miriam Sarah 

Unice Zilpah Melatiah and Nancy from Mansfield August T e 15 th 1783 

Person Choosing to Belong to and join the Town of Foxborougli viz May 

y e first 1780 Asa Morse y e l 8t 

Taken into my house April y e 24 th 1780 Josh a Daniell and Mary his Wife 

from Franklin also three Mulatto Servants viz Anna otis and Perez 

belonging to Said Daniell James Perrigo 
Taken into my house in the month of May 1782 Nelson Miller and Wife 

and Children from Mansfield the Childrens names Sarah John and Allen 
and Likewise Joseph Titus and wife from the same place Joseph Shepard 

[173] 
Azuba Tuper from Mansfield taken in by Capt Nehemiah Carpendeir in 

March 1786 
The widow Pheba Easty John Deen Easty Ruth Easty Elijah Easty from 

Easton taken in by spenser hodges in Dec r 1786 
Mehetabell Williams from Mansfield taken in bv Capt Josiah Pratt in 

Januarv the 15 th 1787 
Entered the 2 nd 1788 by order of the Select Men the following Persons 
Viz widow hannah freeman Late from attleborough 
Ralph Thompson his wife and Child Ralph 
Late from Sharon. William witherel and his wife hannah Late from 

Mansfield 
The widow Priscilla Wellman from Mansfield taken in by M r Timathy 

Morse the 29 th of Decemb er 1788 and Enterised on the Town book by 

the Request of Said Morse the 12 th of January 1789 
John and Mary Franc e way from Sharon taken in by Daniel Hawes of 

Wrentham Came to Reside in this Town the twenty Second Day of 

Dec br 1788 



Copied from Foxborough Vital Statistics, volume 1 : 

[113] 
[L.S.] Suffolk S s : To the Constable of the Town of Foxborough 

Greeting 
In the Name of the Common Wealth of Massachusets You are hereby 
Directed to warn and Give notice to Benjamin Ingraham & Abigail his 
Wife who have lately Come into this Town for the purpose of abiding 
therein not having obtained the Towns Consent therefor that they Depart 
the Same thereof with their Children (viz) Benjamin Cbloe Jemima Juda 
Salley Lois & Lewis and all others under their Care if any they have 
within fifteen days, and of this precept with Your doing thereon You are 
to make Return in to the office of the Clerk of this Town within twenty 
days next Comeing that Such further proceedings may be had in the pre* 
mices as the Law Directs 



1911] Foxborough, Mass., Warnings 41 

Given under our Hands and Seals at Foxborough this fifth Day of 

April A.D. 1791 _,, w 

r Ebenezer Warren ) 

Nathael Clerk y Selectmen 

George Straton J 

Suffolk S s : In obedience to the within Warrant I have notified and 
warnd the within Named Benjamin Ingraham and family to Depart as 
within Directed Jessee Pratt Constable 

Foxboroug Aprill y 6 1791 Atest N Everet Clerk 



Suffolk S 8 To the Constable of the Town of Foxborough in S' 1 County 

Greeting 

In the name of the Commonwealth of Massechusetts You are Directed 
to warn & Give notice to Huldah Tiffiny Single woman who has lately 
Come to this Town for the purpose of abiding therein not having obtained 
the Towns Consent therefor that She depart the limits thereof within fif- 
teen Days — and of this precept You are to make Return with Your doing 
thereon in to the office of the Clerk of this Town of Foxborough within 
twenty Days next Coming that Such further Proceeding may be had in 
the Premices as the Law Directs 

Given under our Hand and Seal at Foxborough affore S d this twenty 

Eighth Day of April A.D. 1791 v , w 

° J r Ebenezer Warren , 

Selectmen 



George Straton 



} 



Suffolk S 8 In obedience to this Warran* I have Notified & warnd the 
within named Huldah Tiffiny to Depart the limits of this Town as within 
prescribed Jessee Pratt Constable 

Foxboroug April 29 • 1791 Atest N Everett Clerk 

[114] 

Suffolk Ss To the Constable of the Town of Foxborough in S (l County 

Greeting 

You are in the Name of the Common Wealth of Massechusetts to warn 
and give Notice to M r8 Sarah Bradshaw, William Bradshaw Nathanael 
Bradsneaw & Mehitibel his wife with their Children (viz) Nathanael Aaron 
& Mehetible Abigail Hawes & Elkanah Clerk all of Sharon in the County 
of Suffolk William Clapp and his wife Mary with their Children (viz) 
William Mary Seth Mehatible & Lucy Ezekiel Boyden & Elias Nason 
all of Walpole in the County of Saffalk Ralph Thompson and his wife 
Mary with their Children (viz) Ralph Billing & Polly Parker Joel Morse 
and wife Chloe their Children (Viz) Joel Stephen Chloe Rachael & Hip- 
zabah all of Stoughton in the County of Soffolk Rebeckah Richardson 
and daughter Olive Isaac Richardson and Wife Jemima with their Chil- 
dren (viz) Allin and Isaac lois Richardson Elenor Ware Oliver Pet! 
and Wife Elisabeth with their Children (viz) Oliver and Nelly and James 
Petty son of Samuel Petty all of Wrentham in the County affore S' 1 Abi- 
gail Tilson and son Holms Nehemiah Tilson and Rhoda Tilson all of Dor- 
Chester in the County affore Sd Eleazer Foster and wife Ruth Rebekah 
Fisher Mary Fisher and Ruth Fisher all of Dedham in the County of Sof- 
folk Keziah Turner of Medfield in the County of Soffolk Samuel Belcher 
of Boston in the County affore S d Stephen Rhodes of Sharon in the 
County affore S d John Pain and wife Rhoda with their Children (viz) 



42 Foxborough, Mass., Warnings [Jan. 

Sarah Jane Achsah Sullivan Rachael and Unice Jabez Grover and wife 
Rachel with their Children (viz) Nancy Fanny Calvin and Sarah David 
Grover and wife Martha with their Children (viz) Mary and David Ben- 
jamin Witherel and wife Sarah Sarah Witherel Jerusha White Rubeen 
Titus and wife Mary with their Son Samuel William Lane all of Mans- 
field in the County of Bristol James Freeman and wife Racael with their 
Children (viz) Ebenezer James Fanny Rachael Asenah Nanny and Sarah 
Daniel Sally and wife Susanna with their Children Charlotee Daniel and 
Susanna all of Attleborough in the County of Bristole Rufus Briggs and 
wife Margarett with their Children (viz) Margarett Hannah Lucy Rufus 
Chloe Rachael and Hepzibah of Norton in the County of Bristol Martha 
Willis of Taunton in the County of Bristol Phebe Esty and son Elijah 
of Stoughton in the County of Soffolk Nelson Miller and wife Sarah with 
their Children (viz) Sarah John Nelson Allen Rebeckah Patience Batney 
and Polly all of Warren in the State of Rhode Island and Providence 
Plantation and Benjamin Hewes in the County of Kiene in the State of New 
hampshire — who have lately Come to Reside in this Town for the purpose 
of [115] Abiding therein not having Obtained the Towns Consent therefor 
— that they Depart the limits thereof with all Such under their Care if 
any they have within fifteen Days — and of this Precept with Your Doing 
thereon You are to make Return into the office of the Clerk of the Town 
of Foxborough within twenty Days that Such further Proceeding may be 
had in the Premices as the Law Directs 

Given under our hands and seals This 26 Day of Decembr at Foxborough 
and in the Year of our Lord A.D. 1791 

Ebenezer Warren ) Selectmen 
Nathanael Clerk >- of 
George Straton ) Foxborou gh 

Suffok S 8 January y e 10 Day 1792 

Pursuant to this Warrant I have Notified all the within Named Persons 
to Depart the limits of this Town according to the within Prescribed Di- 
rections ( Constable 

Jessee Pratt < of 

( Foxborough 

Norfolk Ss To the Constable of the Town of Foxborough in S d County 

Greeting 

You are hereby Required in the Name of the Common Wealth of Mas- 
sechusetts to warn and Give Notice junto Thomas Pettee Residing in S d 
Town of Foxborough in S d County a trantient Person who has lately Come 
into this Town for the Purpose of abiding therein not having Obtained the 
Towns Consent therefor — that He Depart the limits thereof with Anna His 
Wife and Nathan & Nanny their Children within fifteen Days — and of this 
Precept with Your Doings theron you are to make Return in to the office 
of the Clerk of S d Town within twenty Days Next Comeing that Such fur- 
ther Proceeding may be had on the Premices as the Law Directs 

Given under our Hands and seals at Foxboroug h affore S d this 18 Day 

October A.D. 1796 T , TT ^ c , 

Joseph Hewes J Selectmen 

Spencer Hodgers >- of 

Abijah Pratt J Foxbor h 



1911] Emigrants to America from Liverpool 43 

Copied from Foxborough Town Proceedings, page 99 : 

Norfolk s 8 Foxborough Oc br 18 1796 

Persuant to the within Warrant I have notified the within Named Tho- 
mas Pettee to Depart the limits of this Town with Anna his wife and Chil- 
dren Nathan and Nancy within fifteen Day from the Date of this Warrant 

Will m Clerk Cons bl 
April y e 25 1784 

then Came into This Town from Sharon John Coney & his Wife Kezia 
Coney & Children Viz 

John Coney 
Olever Coney 
Edward Coney 
Jeremiah Coney 
Betty Coney 
August y e l d 1784 

then Came into this Town from Walpole William Clap & his Wife Mary 
two Childen wmiam Clap 

Polly Clap 



LIST OF EMIGRANTS TO AMEEICA FROM LIVERPOOL 

1697-1707 

Transcribed by Miss Elizabeth French, and communicated by the Committee on 

English Research 

[Continued from Vol. 64, page 346] 

Servants bound to M r Henry Smith for Virginia on board the Anne & 
Sarah the Twenty Third day of January 1700. 
William Morris of Lancashire 
Mary Morris of the same vx r 
Richard Simons of Liverpoole 
Mary Boucker of Lancashire 
Elizabeth Lunt of Lancashire 
Richard Abraham of Lane' 
James Hall of Northumberland 
James Wilson of Northamptonshire 
John Bowker of Lancashire 
Abraham Bowker D° 
William Briggs of Lane' 



36 - 


4 


30 - 


4 


21 - 


4 


22 - 


4 


23 - 


4 


20 - 


5 


26 - 


5 


20 - 


5 


24 - 


4 


18 - 


4 


22 - 


4 



Servants bound to Virginia on board of the Robert and Elizabeth to M' 
Ralph Williamson 27th January 1700 

Elizabeth Naylor of Exiter 26-4 

Henrv Scoflicld of Lanc r 40 - 4 

Andrew Bird of Shropshire 18-4 

John Whitacre of Lanc r 30-4 

Nathaniell Lidnescey of Hampshire 26-4 

Peter Gowen of Yorkshire 20-4 



44 Emigrants to America from Liverpool [Jan. 

Mary Mills of Lancashire 
Thomas Thornley of Cheshire 
Owen Jones of Anglisie 
Barbury Lensey of Yorkshire 
John Frankland of Middlesex 
Elizabeth Briggs of Hull 
Richard Radley of Manchester 
Thomas Most of Lane' 
James Maddock of Lane' 
Christopher Marsden of Lane' 
Samuell Browne of Whiston in Lane' 
Susan Lea of Cheshire 
Anne Edward of Wales 
Elizabeth Camell of Lanc r 
Elizabeth Davies of Shrowsbury 
Run away Diana Molyneux of Chester 
Sarah Bridg of Cheshire 
James Cartwright of Shropshire Bridgnorth 

i Thomas Pearson of Newcastle 
Daniell Williams of Herefordshire 
Rob fc Goodwin of Lanc r 
John Harrison of Liverpoole 
Thomas Hardman of Lanc r 
Evan Evans of Mountgomeryshire 
Margarett Evans of d° 
William Wright of Rudlandshire 
Elizabeth Wright D° 
Rachell Pattison [of] Cheshire 
Martha Marchie 

Jonathan Plowman of Yorkshire 
Peter Harrison of Lane' 
paid by M r Marsden 
W m Pers of Lancashire 
Rich d Rustin of Chalk in Weltshire TayP 
J n Heal of Cirencest' in Glowstershir Tay 1 
J no Gath of Carlisle 5 year 



23 - 


5 


16 - 


7 


20 - 


4 


20 - 


4 


21 - 


5 


19 - 


4 


37 - 


4 


19 - 


4 


30 - 


4 


20 - 





16 - 


7 


29 - 


4 


25 - 





16 - 


8 


24 - 


5 


20 - 


5 


25 - 





30 - 


5 


21 - 


4 


24 - 


4 


22 - 


4 


21 - 


4 


30 - 


4 


40 - 


5 


30 - 





30 - 


4 


30 - 





19 - 


5 


19 - 


5 


12 - 


10 


24 - 


4 


21 - 


4 


21 - 


4 


21 - 


4 


20 - 


5 



Servants bound to M' William Everard the Eleaventh day of February 
1700 : on board of the Shipp the Lambe of Liverpoole 
Richard Lewis of Mereonithshire 
William Davies of Dorsetshire aged 
Thomas Jones of Denbishire 
William Davies of Denbishire 
Joseph Gibson of Travellin in Wales 
Thomas Worrall of Nantwich 
Thomas Davis of Denbishire 
Robert Morris of Shropshire 
Robert Hughes of Carnarvanshire 
John Hodgkinson of Liverpoole aged 
Randle Carters of Cheshire 
James Towning of Lodg. 86 

so Lodge, Yorks, or The Lodge, Shropshire ( ?) 



11 - 


7 


24 - 


4 


29 - 


4 


21 - 


4 


16 - 


7 


20 - 


4 


21 - 


5 


22 - 


4 


15 - 


9 


9 - 


11 


20 - 


6 


17 - 


5 



1911] Emigrants to America from Liverpool 45 

Christopher Parkinson 87 of Chipping 
John Peares of Flintshire 
Randle Fidians of Cheshire 
John Dod of Denbyshire 
David Jones of Denbishire 
Griffith Hughes of Wales 
Thomas Briscoe of Chester 
Run David Williams of Montgomeryshire 



17 - 


5 


18 - 


7 


22 - 


4 


30 - 


4 


19 - 


7 


18 - 


5 


22 - 


4 


35 - 


4 



rememb. Hugh Topping of Waringh' 



Servants bound to to [sic] M' John Hughes the Tenth day of February 
1700 

Mary Owery of Denbishire aged 15 - 8 

Margarett Nicholls of Flintshire 26 - 5 



Serv ts to M' John Charters on board the Lambe of Liverpoole 11 th ' 
Feb r y 1700 

Robert Oglebie of Lane' 17 - 4 

John Brittin of Lancashire 22 - 4 



Serv t9 bound to M' Tho : Heyes To Antego this 8 day of March 1700 
Paid f John Low of Lane' Aged 16 - 6 

1° Apr 1701 ( William Lealand of Boulton in Lane 13-7 



89 



Nov 1° 1701 Serv ts to M r Tho : Williamson 

Joshua Rycroft of Cheshire Aged 12 - 8 

Nov : 1° 1701 Servants bound to M' William Part 
Ralph Cockett of Dunyan 88 Aged 
Elizabeth Stansel [A]ged 21 Yeares 
Robert Jackson of Lane' A[ged] 
Ellen Roson of Lane' Aged 
Mary Harefoote of Ormshire 

November 8 th 1701 

Serv t8 bound to M r John Gore 

Elizabeth Wright of Cheshire Aged ab l 
Ship7 Serving Joseph Tagg of d° 
men p d Michaell Aldridg of Yorkeshire 

per J n : Richard Pearson of Northampton 

Cockshutt Easter Miers of Lanc r 

Mary Oragehead of Cheshire 

Abigail Bradshaw of d° 

No : Eighth : Servants bound to M r Samuell Medgley 
Eliz Oakes [of] Cheshire 
p' Alice Slator d° 

87 The following items refer to Chipping: Christopher, g. of Robert Parkinson of 
Chepin, bapt. 5 Mar. 1681-2. Robert, s. of John Perkinson of Cock bill, bapt. 12 May 
1661. Robert, s. of Richard Perkinson of Chippin, bapt. 26 Sept. 1655. 

88 Dunham (?) 

89 This and the six items following it are crossed out in the original. 



15 - 


7 


21 - 


4 


15 - 


7 


20 - 


4 


19 - 


4 


21 - 





20 - 


5 


40 - 


4 


26 - 


5 


20 - 


mm ' 




20 - 


5 


27 - 


5 


18 - 


4 


20 - 


4 



46 Emigrants to America from Liverpool [Jan. 

Jane Robinson [of] Lancaster 20-4 

25 Octo br 1701 Tho Buttler Son of W m Buttler to Ganther Carefoote for 

7 Yeares 



Serv t8 to M' Edw d Tarleton 21 of November 1701 

Walter Richards of Herefordshire 33 - 4 



Serv t8 to M r Basnett 

Eliz Voughan of the Citty of London 20-7 



4° Decem r 1701. Serv ts to M r John Greene 

William Peares of Carnarvanshire 12 - 9 



4 Decem r 1701 Servants bound to William Gurdon 

aged 
James Smallwood [of] Cheshire Aged 27-4 

Ann Goodwin d° 22-4 

9 Rich d Dinsdall of Wenswide in Yorkshire 32-4 



Serv ts to M' Nehemiah Jones 4 december 1701 

Joseph Gregg Apprentice of Ash ton 22 - 5 



Servants bound to m' Michael Wentworth 28 th 9b 1701 

Thomas Greene of Yorkshire aged between 27 yrs for 6 

yeares 
Joshua Thompson of Yorkshire aged about 20 yeares for 6 
yeares 



Jan 3 1701 John Medecine App to m' Andrew Clark for 9 yeares, y e 

s d John Medecine aged about 13 yeares 



Janu' 5 1701 Serv ts to m' Henry Brown 

John Patience of Wiltshire husband' aged about 34 yeares 



James Hamer of Acper in Lancashire near Wigan is sus- 
pected to go abroad & I am Oblig d to Stop him. 



Serv ts bound to John Ball 

Y 

John Whitehead of Wrixen in Lanc r Aged 15 - 9 

Servants bound to Thurstan Brachall 

Mary Allam of Warrington 20 - 5 



12 tu February 1701 

Serv t8 bouod to M r Augustine Woodward 

W m Beniford of Cheshire 

John Askie of Cheshire 

Sarah Heanes of London Spinst' 



Age 


time 


15 - 


9 


14 - 


9 


21 - 


5 



1911] Emigrants to America from Liverpool 47 

21 Feb Melicent Astly aged 12 years 

Mary Taylor of Staffordshire 

Eliz : Thomas of Wrexam 

Eliz : Morris of Leverp 1 Spinstr 
24 Jan' Mary Jones of Brecknockllin 

James Feshel of Cheshire 

Margtte Hughes of Whitby in Cheshire 

Ann Hardgrace of Lancashir 

AY 111 Brindley of London Shoomakr 

Hannah Yales of Chester Spins' 
March 5 1701 Margarette Welsly of Speak 



12 - 


7 


18 - 


5 


30 - 


5 


25 - 


4 


17 - 


5 


30 - 


4 


13 - 


9 


22 - 


4 


25 - 


4 


20 - 


5 


19 - 


6 



To m' Edw' Smalley 
Feb 26 Ann Pugh of Much Wool ton 20-4 



Feb 4 Tho : Chorter of Manchest to Adam Oldfiel 2 : [sic] - 5 



Servants to m' W m Benn M r of y e Eliz & Ann to Virgin' 
Feb r 19 J no Howard of Witherilach Lancashir 28-5 

Feb 24 William Gedlin of Lancashir 18 - 5 



June 29 1702 Servants to m' Thomas Jameson of Maryland 

Edw d Jaspers of Namptwich in Cheshire Tayl r 
July 1 Alexand 1- Tyror to m' Thos Jameson 

July 1 William Hoyl of Hallifax in Yorkshire 

July 3 liichard Anderton of Knowesley 

July 6 W m Edge of Manchest r Serv* to W m Evrard 

14 Jane Chad wick of Clie viand near Yorkshire 



21 - 


4 


19 - 


9 


12 - 


11 


13 - 


9 


17 - 


7 


24 - 


5 



To m' Smalwood & m' Everard 
Aprel 19 tb 1702 

Yeares 
Abraham Su[ ] of Leeds Yorkshire to m' 

Smalwood aged 15 - 9 

June 19 1702 Moses Rithwell of Chester 16 - 7 

June 27 Jno Marshall [of] Southampton 15 - 8 

July 6 Ann lb* ward 90 of Berry Lancashire 20-7 

6 Jane Knight of Congleton 30 - 7 

6 Anna Crosfield of Cartmell Lancar 18 - 7 



Aug. 14 1702 Luke Perrey to m' [blank] 
to m' Stephen 11 [blotted] 
8b. 6 1702 John Earthead of Brinly in Lancashire 18-7 

8b y e 10 1702 James Burl of Westmoreland Ag' 27-4 



ag* time 

8b. 15 1702 Henry Wilson Servant to m' W" Peters 14-7 

9° At Bury : u An," dau. of Roger Hewood, b. 20 Nov., bapt. 10 Dec., 1682. Roger 
Hay ward or Moorside d. 22 Mar., bur. 23 Mar., 1698. 



48 Emigrants to America from Liverpool [Jan. 

Servants to m' Nehem. Jones 

Janu' first Thorn' Hart of Ashton 17-7 

Mary Morris of Ashto 18 - 6 

jno Xyrr of Liverpoole 18 - 6 



9b 17th 1702 Richard Peling Son of Georg Peling late of y e Citty of 

Chester Shoomaker aged about 16 Yeares hath bound 
himselfe a Serv to Barbadoes or any other of y e Charyb- 
bee Island for 7 yeares, after his Arrival at Barbadoes or 
one of y e s d Islands 



age yrs 
xb. 7. 1702 Mary Fish of Whittle in y e Woods Lancas App r 

to m' Gilb : Eden Or his Assigns to Virg. or 
Maryland 91 29-5 



xb. 8. 1702 Jane Morgan serv* : to m' J no Lancast 14 - 



Age year 
xb. 16. 1702 Richard Hatton of Tarbook to sd Andr' Clarke 

of Belfast 29 4 

xb r 21 W m Philips of Cork in Ireland to m' : J n0 Lancst 48 4 

xb. 26 1702 J no Fooles of Cabin in Lancast husbndm' 25 4 



Jan : 8* 1702 Roger Preswicke of Manchr Taylor to Randle 

Piatt 
Jan: 9 : 1702 Ralph Bate of Croft hus to Capt. Henry Brown 22 
Jan 13 1702 Timothy Dickinson of Stockport Chap' 
Jan. 16 1702 Alice Steel of Knutsford in Cheshire 



Jan. 20 
20 
20 



1702 Rob 1 Buckley of Cronton 
Ann Steed of Sephton 
Mary Woods 92 of Bolton 



20 


4 


22 


: 5 


35 


: 4 


21 : 


4 


15 


9 


25 


5 


23 : 


5 



To Tho W m son 
March 5th 1702 

Richard Forber of Whiston 17 : 6 



To m' Ralph W m son 
March 17 1702 

Kather' Williams of Abborguelley 93 in Wales 18 : 6 
17 W m Parrey of Ridgland 94 in Wales 18 : 6 



To m W m Robinson 
March 17: 1702 

J no Mercer Son of J n0 Merce' of Eurton Shoo- 

make' 15 : 6 



91 This entry crossed out in the original record. Vide infra for duplicate entry. 

92 Mary Wood, dau. of Samuel and Dorothy of Breightmet, b. 27 Jan., bapt. 29 Jan., 
1G82-3, at Bolton. 

9a Abergele. 
94 Raglan ( ?) 



1911] 



Emigrants to America from Liverpool 



49 



An Ace 1 : of Serv ts : in y e Tabitha and Priscill Capt W m Tarleton 

Comand r 

Age Year 
28 : Ja' 1702 Jno Harrison of Liverpoole Assign d to m' James 

Tildesley 24 4 

Jno Humphrey of Denbyshire to m' Geo' : Tyrer 

& Assign d to m' Tildesly 12 : 9 

Mary Fish of Whittle in y e Woods in Lancaste' 

Spins* to m'. Eden Ap. to m'. Tildesley 29-5 

Rich d Webb son of Edw'. Webb of London In- 

keep, to m' Geo : Tyrer assign d to m' Tildesly 16 
Jane Granth' of Olringliam in Cheshire 23 

Ann Tool of Fingall in Ireland Spinst r to m' W m 
Tarleton & by him assign 11 to m' James Til- 
desley 2 1 
James Hatton of Bough ton in Cheshir 14 
Eliz : Valentine of Liverpoole 21 



Feb 3 

7xb. 

18 xb. 

9 Ja' 
1 Jan' 



6: Feb 
29. Jan' 



7 
4 



4 

7 
5 



March 20: 1702 

Ellen Hughes of Denbishire to Daniel Faurell Carpen 1 of y € 
Brittania 21 : 5 



An Ace 1 of Serv' Bound to m' : J n0 Charters Anno 1702 



James Low of Prescott 

Mary Robinson of Thornton of Dalamores 95 

in Cheshire Spinst 
Eliz : Wright of Liverpoole Spinst r 
Jinnet Roy 1 of Preston in Lancash' Spins 1 
Eliz : Dixon of ye Town of Lancs r Spins 1 
Mary Fletcher 96 of Macclesfield in Cheshire 

Spinst 
James Brown of Carleton in Cumberland 
James Aldorson of Helig in sneidale in y e 

County of York 
J" Hunter of Askrigg in Yorkshire 
Apr 1 9. 1703 Eliz : Hughes of Wrexam 
9 : Marg" Gaylen of Ruthin 



January 20. 

28. 

Feb 20: 
17: 
Jan 18 : 
18: 

29: 
March 10 

10 



To m' : Samuel Sanford 
Feb. 15. 1702 Peter Wilson of Carlisle 

2-") Thorn' Rawson of Wrexam in Wales 

March 27 W 1 " Heyes 



Age 


Yearcs 


15 


: 4 


20 


: 4 


15 


: 4 


19 


: 4 


20 


: 4 


16 


: 4 


21 


: 4 


22 


: 4 


18 


: 4 


21 


• 5 


36 


: 5 


12 : 


9 


14 : 


6 


16 : 


7 



T<> m' Joseph Briggs 
Janu' 11). 1702 

Thorn': Elleson of Preston on y* Hill in 
Cheshire 
20 : Eliz : Johnson of Macklesfield in Cheshire 
12: Ezekiel Holms of Frodsham 
6: W a Hamlet of Wavetree 



12 : 9 
25 : 4 
15: 7 
10 : 11 



95 Thornton-le-More or, as it was probably called at that time, Thornton de la More. 
96 Mary, dau. of Alexander Fletcher of Macclesfield, bapt. 1 May 1687 at Macclesfield. 



50 Emigrants to America from Liverpool [Jan. 

To m' : J no Gore 
Ap' 2. 1703 J no Ashton of Whiston 
Anne Steed of Jure Lan 
Rich d Jakeman of Skip ton brawn Yorksh 
Mary Woods of Bolton 
Rob* Buckley near Preston 
March 17 Rich d Ronell of Livrpoole 

3 [blank] Penkell 

Feb. 27 Peter Penkell Pieer [last two words crossed out] 12 



Tom'. Richard Lathom 

April 6. 1703 Rich d Ingam 97 of Wood Plumpton in Lane 
Ap'. 10. 1703 John Jackson son of Rich d of Preston Inkeep 1 



April 12. 1703 to m' J n0 Gore John Pelton of [blank] in 

Lancashire 
15. 1703 Easter Deakin of Toxteth Park in Lancashire 
21: 1703 James Johnson 
26: 1703 Ann Linacre of Livrpoole 



20 


5 


21 : 


5 


22 : 


4 


22 


5 


13 : 


9 


20 


: 4 


20 


: 5 


12 


: 11 


age 
30 


year 
: 4 


_ 


4 



To m' Thos Leavins 
April 7 W m Isherwood of Bolton Lancast 16: 7 



13 : 


9 


22 


: 5 


18 


: 7 


38 


: 4 



Servants bound to m' Thomas Hughes 

xb. 17. 1702 Edw d Tatlocke of Childwall in Lancashire 22 
March 23. 1702/3 

Kath' Prier of Carmarthenshire 21 
Ap'. 1. 1703 Pemberton Proudlow of Sandwich in Cheshire 15 

Steph' Christian 30 

Ap'. 20 : 1703 J n0 Evans of Anglesy in Roskallin 98 Parish 12 



5 
9 
4 

9 



To m' Henry Brown 
April 26. 1703 J n0 Poston Off Shrewsberrey 17 : 5 



April 26. 1703 Ruth Lingard to m' Joseph Briggs 18 : 4 



April 26. 1703 Evan Jones of Carnarvansh to m' J n Charters 30 4 



April 29. 1703 Thorn' Wharton of Eurton to m' Rich d Wright 

in y e Brittan to Virgin' 19 : 5 

97 Richard Ingham and Ellin Porter, both of Wood Plumpton, m. 18 Sept. 1692. 
"Rhoscolyn. 

[To be concluded] 



1911] First Ownership of Ohio Lands 51 



FIRST OWNERSHIP OF OHIO LANDS 

By Albion Morris Dyer, A.M., of Cleveland, Ohio 
[Continued from Vol. 64, p. 369] 

The lists of names of first owners of lands within the limits of the State 
of Ohio, as proposed on an earlier page of this writing, here follow. They 
are constructed for the purpose of this publication by comparison of the 
several documents mentioned. 77 

First Owners of Lands in Ohio 

The sale of lots or the Four Ranges of Townships at public vendue in 
the City of New York, September 21 to October 9, 1787, terminated the 
period of reservation or prohibition of " settlement and purchase of the 
lands inhabited or claimed by the Indians." 78 Purchasers of lots at this 
sale obtained thereby the right of entry and occupancy of the lands that 
they had purchased ; all others were trespassers, excepting the French and 
Canadians in the Illinois Company, who were protected by their oath of 
fidelity to Virginia. 79 These purchasers received certificates of payment of 
purchase money issued by the Treasurer of the United States, 80 which en- 
titled them to such right. Certain rjurchasers, no doubt, moved at once 
upon their lands, probably from the vantage camps on the Virginia hills over- 
looking the forbidden river, but other purchasers made no actual settlements ; 
facts to be ascertained by those especially interested. 81 Their names appear 
in the Schedule of Sales returned by the Treasurer of the United States 
after full payment for the lots had been made, as ordained by the act of 
Congress passed May 20, 1785. They appear also, except the forfeitures 
for non-payment of purchase money, in the official Record of Patents, and 
on the plats of the surveyors, to which reference has been made. 

The Schedule of Sales contains the names of purchasers with other data, 
in order as the sales were made ; description of each lot sold ; location by 
numerals to indicate the range, township, and lot; number of acres in each 
lot ; amount of purchase price ; payments made, etc. The Record of Sales 
is a volume made up of printed blanks used by the Board of Treasury 
for recording the patents as issued, one full page for each lot patented. 

77 Cf. Register for October, 1910, p. 369. 

78 As proclaimed according to Act of Congress passed September 22, 1783, entited 
"An ordinance prohibiting settlement and purchase of certain lands." 

79 Cf. Ri-gister for April, 1910, p. 268. 

i0 Cf. note 8-1, infra, section 4. Advertisement of the Board of Treasury for the sale. 

81 An entry in the Journal of John Matthews (Hildreth's Pioneer History of the Ohio 
Valley, p. 188) is especially interesting in this connection : 

November 30, [1787] A part of this month I have been on the West Hide of the Ohio with Mr 
Simpson and Colonel Martin, assisting them in the survey of the lands they bought at the public 
salt's in New York... 

There is no record of a sale in the name of Simpson. James Simpson was Surveyor 
for the State of Maryland in the Geographer's Department, butCapt. Absalom Martin, 
Surveyor for the State of New Jersey, purchased and occupied as his permanent home 
two fractional lots on the Ohio River bottoms opposite Wheeling ; land which he had 
himself surveyed under Hutchins the year before. He took possession of his property 
within a month or six weeks of the date of sale, and appears to be the first known 
tier in the Western Territory. Captain Martin was the son of Ephraim Martin of 
Baskenridge, N. J. (cf. Papers of the Continental Congress, No. 56, p. 173), and his 
place on the Ohio River w r as the landing place from Wheeling, now known as Martin's 
Ferry, Ohio. 

VOL. LXV. 4 



52 



First Ownership of Ohio Lands 



[Jan. 



The pages are numbered progressively and dated as filled out, and the 
blanks are filled in with name and other data corresponding with the items 
of the Schedule of Sales. 8 " 2 The plats of the surveyors show the exteriors 
of the townships as surveyed, on which are lines drawn at right angles to 
represent the 36 square lots in each township. The plats are drawn on the 
scale of 40 chains to the inch, making each of these lots two inches square, 
on which is written the name of purchaser, date, acres, etc. The lots are 
numbered, also the townships and ranges as required by the ordinance : 
Ranges ; westward from I to vn beginning with the Pennsylvania line. 
Townships, northward from the river, each range beginning with Town- 
ship No. 1, and the lots ; northward from the base line of the township, in 
ranges of six, beginning with Lot I at the southeast corner. 83 

From this data not only the names of owners but the situation of each 
lot, according to present day geography, may be ascertained 84 and designated 
by modern names of political divisions, county and township. The region 
covered by the seven Ranges of Townships may readily be traced on a map 

82 Many pages of this volume were not used, as the form was changed for the Pitts- 
burgh sale, and only 111 patents were issued. Some of the pages are signed with the 
names of the three members of the Board of Treasury, but most of them are not so 
signed. The patents are recorded in the several county records of Ohio, and they 
correspond with the form given in the Ordinance of May 20, 1785. 

B3 Lots or sections in the Seven Ranges of Townships are not numbered as in the 
later surveys. According to the terms of the ordinance of May 20, 1785 : 

The plats of the townships respectively shall be marked by subdivisions into lots of one mile 
square or 040 acres, in the same direction as the external lines and numbered from 1 to 30, always 
beginning the succeeding range of the lots with the number next to that with which the pre- 
ceding one concluded, 

while the law of May 18, 1796, required that 

the sections shall be numbered respectively, beginning with number one, in the northeast 
section, and proceeding west and east alternately, through the township, with progressive num- 
bers till the. thirty-sixth be completed. 

Thus it happens that some of the townships of Columbiana, Carroll, and Stark 
counties, part of which were outside the Old Seven Ranges of Townships, have two 
sets of townships and sections in the same townships with the same numbers. 

64 The townships offered for sale were described by numerals in the advertisement 
published by the Board of Treasury, which reads as follows : 

Treasury of the United States. 

May 14, 1787. 

The Commissioners of the Board of Treasury of the United States, give notice, That on the 
21st day of .September next, will be exposed to Sale, at the place where the United States in 
Congress may hold their sessions— The following Townships and Lots of Lands in the Western 
Territory, which were surveyed last year, under the direction of the Geographer General of the 
UniteO states viz. 

Third Range. 

No. 1, containing 6.596 acres. No 

2, 11,797 

3, 14,482 

5, 23,040 

6, 23,040 

7, 23,040 

8, 23,040 

9, 23,040 

10, 23,040 

11, 23,040 

12, 23,040 

The admirable quality of these Lands, and the favorable climate in which they are situated, 
arc too well known lo need description. The conditions of sale are as follows, viz. 

1st. The townships or fractional parts of townships throughout the different ranges, will be 
sold either entire or in lots in alternate order; that is to say, where a township or fractional 
part of .i town-hip is sold entire, the next will be sold in lots, agreeably to the ordinance of the 
*0lh of May, l. 

2d. The lands are not to be sold under a dollar per acre, payable in gold or silver, or any of 
tin securities of the United States. 

od. The purchasers are to pay the charges of survey, which are to be estimated at thirty-six 
dollars in specie, or certificates as aforesaid for every "township; and in the same proportion for 
f'ra i ional pari a </f townships or lots; this payment to be made at the sales, and in case of fail- 
ure, the lands lo he again exposed to public auction. 

4th. One third of the purchase money is to be paid at the time of purchase; and the remain- 
ing two thirds in three months after the date of the sale; on which payment a certificate shall 



First Range. 
No. 3, containing 4,350 acres. 





Second R 


ange. 


No. 1, 


containin 


g 1,386 


2, 




5,434 


3, 




8,598 


5, 




21,130 


6, 




23,040 






23,040 


8, 




2:.\»0 


y, 




18,044JL 



Fourth Range. 

. 1, containing 4,574 acres. 

2, 21,350 

3, 23,040 

7, 23,040 

8, 23,040 

10, 23,040 

11, 23,040 

12, 23,040 

13, 23,040 



1911] First Ownership of Ohio Lands 53 

of Ohio 85 by following the East and West line from the intersection of the 
Pennsylvania western boundary and the Ohio River westward across seven 
ranges to the northwest corner of Rose Township, Carroll County (Tp. 
No. 16), 86 and thence by a meridian line southward across Tuscarawas, 
Guernsey, Noble, and Washington counties to a point where the meridian 
crosses the Ohio River about a mile east of the city of Marietta, which is 
in Township 2 of Range viii. 87 The lots purchased at the New York sale 
are all within the four counties, Columbiana, Jefferson, Monroe, and Bel- 
mont, and the initials of these counties are used in the following list to in- 
... ~ ■ 

dicate the situation of the several lots — closer designations being expressed 

by names of township, or otherwise. 

Arnold H(enry) Dohrman 88 n p (no patents issued) 



be given by the Treasurer of the United States, which shall entitle the person to whom the same 
is given to receive from the Commissioners of this Board a proper title; provided, that if the 
second payment is not made at the time above specified, the first payment is to be forfeited, and 
the lana on which the forfeit accrued be again set up for sale. 

5th. The platts of the townships will be marked by subdivisions into lots of one mile square, 
or 640 acres, and numbered from 1 to 36; and out of each township, Lot No. 8, 11, 26 and 2'.), are 
to be reserved for future sale; Lot No. 16, for the maintenance of Public Schools within the 
respective township, as many lots of the same number as shall be found therein. There will 
al*o be reserved to the United States one third part of all gold and silver, lead and copper mines. 

Proper maps and descriptions of the lands will be exhibited at the time and place of sale, and 
the sales will continue from day to day until the whole are sold. 

Samuel Osgood, ) 

Walter Livingston, \ Commissioners. 
Arthur Lee, ) 

From 

The New York racket, No. 697, Tuesday, May 15, 1787; Providence Gazette, Aug. 11, 18, 25, 
Sept. 1, 1787; Connecticut Courant, June 25, July 9, 23, Aug. 6, 1787; Pennsylvania Packet, Sept. 
6, 13, 18, 17&7; etc., etc. 

85 The latest map of Ohio, issued by the General Land Office, bears the date 1910. 

86 There are two Townships ]S T o. 16 in Carroll County, the northernmost being out- 
side the Seven Ranges of Townships, 

b7 The Seven Kanges of Townships are first shown on the map entitled: 

A Map of the Federal Territory from the Western Boundary of Pennsylvania to the Scioto 
River, laid down from the latest informations and divided into Townships and fractional parts 
of Townships agreeably to the ordinance of the Honble Congress passed in May, 1785, 

which, according to the Phillips List of Maps of America, p. 626, is the "Map to ac- 
company Cutler's 'Explanation of the map of the federal lands, confirmed by the 
treaties of 1784. ..Salem, 1787.' " The famous map issued by Joel Barlow for European 
exploitation of the Scioto Company's lands, entitled : " Plan des achates des Compazines 
de 1' Ohio" (Cf. Winsor, vol. vii, p. 532; the Library of Congress has a fine copy 
of the Barlow map recently picked up by Mr. Phillips in Paris), shows the region 
marked: " Sept ranges de Municipalitere acquis par des individus, et occupes depuis 
1786," and described as " Habite et defriche," which, considering the date of Barlow's 
activity, 1788, is surprising. 

A " Plat of the Seven Kanges of Townships being part of the Territory of the United 
States X. W. of the River Ohio which by late act of Congress are directed to be sold... W. 
Barker, Sculp." issued for use of the second sale of lots, shows the survey as altered to 
fit the latest land laws, 1796. The sub-divisions sold at the New York sale are marked 
on this plat. This plate seems to have been used by Matthew Carey for editions of the 
American Atlas as late as 1818. (A reproduction from an original print is in Avery's 
History, vol. vi, betw. pp. 4U6 and 407.) 

An outline map of the State of Ohio, showing the land divisions, prepared by Col. 
Chas. Whittlesey and published in W. It. H. S. Tract Xo. 61, represents the Seven 
Ranges of Townships as extending northerly to the base line of the Western Re lerve, 
whereas the writings of Col. Whittlesey on this subject, in this and other publicatio 
correctly describe the Ohio surveys. The strip of Land, twenty-five miles wide, be- 
tween tne Seven Ranges of Townships and the Western Reserve, was surveyed in 1 801 
by extending the ranges northward from the East and West line to the 11° of latitu 
which was forbidden by earlier resolution of ( ongress, May '.), 178i>. 

^ Dohrman [Dorhman] is the Portuguese refugee honored by Congress (Land 
Laws of the U. S., p. ^22) with liberal pensions in recognition of his services to Amer- 
ican sailors during the war. After his escape from Lisbon he appeai-s as a merchant 
in Chambers Street, X'ew i'ork. Xo doubt lie attended the sale and made the first 
purchase of land on the public domain. Congress voted to him a township of land in 
the Seven Ranges of Townships, and he went ivest to take possession of his property, 
lie lived and died at Steubenville, Jefferson County, where he lies buried, and where 
his descendants still reside. There are many traditions in the family concerning 



54 



First Ownership of Ohio Lands 



[Jan. 



II 3 17 1J acres 

II 5 3 48J " 

Absalom Martin 

II 3 18 36J acres 

II 3 23 293J " 

Abijah Hammond 

II 3 19 20 J acres 

II 3 20 85 " 

II 3 21 4 " 

II 5 1 1£ " 

II 5 3 188J " 

Robert Kirkwood (Kercliwood) 

II 3 27 546| acres 

II 5 9 640 " 

II 5 15 640 " 

II 5 18 640 " 

Jn° Cowenhoven (Covenhoven) 

II 5 4 558| acres 

II 57 7 640 " 

Wm. McKennau 

II 5 10 640 acres 

II 5 17 640 " 

Wm. Manning 

II 5 13 640 acres 

John Foulks 

91 II 5 12 640 acres 

91 II 9 1 144 " 

II 9 9 270 " 

III 2 10 75J " 

Benj. Manning 

II 5 14 640 acres 

Jacob Martin 

II 5 19 640 acres 

John Learmonth (Learmouth) 

II 5 20 640 acres 

II 5 21 640 " 

John Lyon 

II 5 22 640 acres 

IIonbl e . Arthur Lee Esq 

II 92 5 30 640 acres 



1 : 48 dollars 89 
348 : 67 " 

Patents 2-3 
356:73 dollars 
1321:79 " 

Patents 13-17 
103 : 70 dollars 
340 " 

18 : 45 (t 

22 : 87 " 
836:42 " 

90 Patents 59-62 
2204:8 dollars 
680 " 

640 " 

640 " 

Jun Patents 67-68 
1083 : 9 dollars 
640 " 

Patents 67-58 
720 dollars 
640 " 

Patent 30 
706 : 60 dollars 

Patents 34-36 
720 dollars 
153 " 

270 : 68 " 
228 : 10 " 

Patent 33 
660 dollars 

Patent 31 
640 dollars 

Patents 63-64 
640 dollars 
640 " 

Patent Go 
640 dollars 

Patents 8-12 
640 dollars 



B Martin's Ferry 
J Warren Tp. 

March 5. 1783 
B Martin's Ferry 
B " " ' 

March 10, 1788 
B Pultney Tp. 
B " « 

B " " 

J Warren Tp. 
J Wells Tp. 

May 27, 1788 
B Bridgport 
J Wells Tp. 
J " " 

J " " 

July 26, 1788 
J Wells Tp. 
J Isl d Creek Tp. 

April 27, 1788 
J Wells Tp. 
J " " 

April 10, 1788 
J Warren Tp. 

April 10, 1788 
J Wells Tp. 
J Saline Tp. 
C Yellow Creek Tp. 
M Salem Tp. 

April 10, 1788 
J Warren Tp. 

April 10, 1788 
J Warren Tp. 

May 27, 1788 
J Wells Tp. 
J " " 

May 27, 1788 
J Wells Tp. 

March 10, 1788 
J Wells Tp. 



their ancestor. Among others is this, that he was taken to Lisbon when an infant by 
his parents, Dutch adventurers, and was in that fateful city when the earthquake 
occurred. He was saved from destruction by his nurse, who crawled, with the infant 
at her breast, under the stone stoop of the house, which shielded him from the flying 
debris. 

89 Old style notation with fractions in the 90th denomination. 

90 Thus spelled in Kecord of Patents. 

91 The items are marked Patents 34 and 33 respectively, although they come in the 
above order. 

92 This patent is entered erroneously as Tp. 3 in Record of Patents. 



1911] 



First Ownership of Ohio Lands 



55 



II 


3 


30 


640 


acres 


640 


dollars 


B 


Pease Tp. 


II 


3 


34 


640 


tt 


640 


tt 


B 


a ,t 


II 


3 


35 


640 


a 


640 


a 


B 


a a 


II 


3 


36 


640 


tt 


640 


a 


B 


tt a 


James Gray 






Patents 21-25 




March 31, 1788 


II 


7 


1 


640 


acres 


640 


dollars 


J 


Isl d Creek Tp. 


98 npII 


7 


2 


640 


a 


641 


a 


J 


it a a 


II 


7 


4 


640 


a 


640 


a 


J 


a a n 


II 


7 


6 


640 


a 


640 


a 


J 


a it 

• 


II 


7 


27 


640 


a 


640 


a 


J 


it a a 


94 npII 


7 


31 


640 


a 


640 


a 


J 


a a a 


94 n P n 


7 


32 


640 


u 


640 


n 


J 


n a a 


94 npII 


9 


7 


639J 


tt 


639: 


45 " 


J 


Saline Tp. 


III 


2 


17 


149 


tt 


474: 


85 " 


M 


Salem Tp. 


Daniel Tur 


ner 






Patent 72 


September 15, 178£ 


II 


7 


5 


640 


acres 


740 


dollars 


J 


Isl d Creek Tp. 


Doctr. Robt. Johnston (Johnson) Patents 37-55 




April 17, 1788 


II 


5 


31 


640 


acres 


•940 


dollars 


J 


Warren Tp. 


II 


7 


10 


640 


tt 


640 


tt 


J 


Isl d Creek Tp. 


II 


7 


17 


640 


a 


640 


u 


J 


a a a 


II 


7 


18 


640 


a 


640 


a 


J 


a a a 


II 


7 


13 


640 


a 


760 


ti 


J 


tt a a 


II 


7 


19 


640 


a 


680 


a 


J 


it a a 


II 


7 


21 


640 


a 


640 


a 


J 


a a a 


II 


7 


22 


640 


a 


640 


a 


J 


a tt a 


II 


7 


23 


640 


a 


640 


a 


J 


it a a 


II 


7 


24 


640 


tt 


640 


a 


J 


»t a a 


95 II 


9 


4 


145} 


a 


286: 


85 " 


C 


Wellsville 


95 II 


7 


34 


640 


a 


726: 


60 " 


J 


Isl d Creek Tp. 


II 


9 


5 


5421 


a 


542: 


45 " 


C 


Wellsville 


III 


6 


13 


640 


a 


640 


a 


B 


Pultney Tp. 


III 


6 


23 


640 


a 


640 


a 


B 


it a 


III 


6 


24 


640 


a 


640 


it 


B 


a it 


III 


8 


1 


640 


a 


640 


a 


J 


Smithfield Tp. 


III 10 


3 


640 


a 


640 


tt 


J 


Salem Tp. 


IV 


1 


33 


221 


a 


1105 


a 


M 


Cochransville. 


John D. 


Mercier 






Patent 56 




April 23, 1788 


II 


7 


12 


640 


acres 


720 


[dollars 


J 


Isl d Creek Tp. 


Joshua Merereau 


(Mersereau) 


Patents 69-71 




September 5, 1788 


II 


7 


28 


640 


acres 


640 


dollars 


J 


Isl d Creek Tp. 


II 


9 


10 


640 


it 


640 


tt 


C 


Wellsville 


II 


9 


17 


640 


it 


640 


a 


C 


Yellow Creek Tp. 


George . 


Douglass 






Patent 19 




March 20, 1788 


Ill 


2 


9 


2121 


acres 


578: 


53 dollars 


M 


Ohio Tp. 


Henry W. '. 


Livingston 




n p 






Ill 


1 


— 


5316 


acres 


5316 


dollars 


M 


Lee Tp. 



» 3 Patented April 1, 1789, No. 29, to John Crawford. 

94 Patented March 31, 1789, No. 26-2S, to William Bowne. 

9 5 These items are marked Patents 48 and 47 respectively, although they come in 
the above order. 



56 



First Ownership of Ohio Lands 



[Jan. 



Cornelius Ray 






Patent 18 




March 12, 1788 


III 


2 


19 


385i 


acres 


385: 


23 dollars 


M 


Ohio Tp. 


James E 


lurnside 






Patent 20 




March 20, 1788 


III 


2 


24 


240f 


acres 


278 


: 33 dollars 


M 


Salem Tp. 


Henry Kuhl 






Patents 5-7 




March 6, 1788 


III 


6 


3 


640 


acres 


660 


dollars 


B 


Pease Tp. 


IV 


7 


3 


640 


a 


640 


a 


B 


Richland Tp. 


IV 


7 


17 


640 


a 


640 


a 


B 


a a 


The Rev. Willm. 


Linn 




Patent 4 




March 5, 1788 


Ill 10 


4 


640 


acres 


640 


dollars 


J 


Salem Tp. 


Jacob Blackwell 






Patent 66 




July 26, 1788 


IV 


7 


10 


640 


acres 


640 


dollars 


B 


Richland Tp. 


John Martin 






Patent 1 




March 4, 1788 


IV 


7 


20 


640 


acres 


640 


dollars 


B 


Richland Tp. 


Alex r . McComb ( 


Macom 


b) & Willm. Edgar 96 n p 






II 


3 


24 


640 


acres 


1280 


dollars 


B 


Martin's Ferry 


II 


3 


26 


640 


a 


800 


it 


B 


Pultney Tp. 


II 


3 


29 


640 


a 


640 


a 


B 


Pease „Tp. 


11 


3 


31 


640 


a 


640 


a 


B 


Mead Tp. ♦ 


II 


3 


32 


640 


a 


640 


a 


B 


a a 


II 


5 


5 


640 


a 


1326: 


60 " 


J 


Wells Tp. 


II 


5 


6 


640 


a 


1306: 


60 " 


J 


a a 


II 




7 


640 


a 


1600 


a 


J 


Warren Tp. 


II 


5 


23 


640 


a 


640 


a 


J 


Wells Tp. 


II 


5 


24 


640 


a 


640 


a 


J 


it a 


II 





25 


640 


a 


640 


a 


J 


Warren Tp. 


II 


5 


27 


640 


a 


640 


dollars 


J 


Wells Tp. 


II 


5 


28 


640 


a 


640 


a 


J 


a a 


II 


5 


32 


640 


a 


640 


a 


J 


Warren Tp. 


11 


5 


33 


640 


a 


640 


a 


J 


Wells Tp. 


II 


5 


34 


640 


a 


640 


a 


J 


a a 


II 


5 


35 


640 


a 


640 


a 


J 


a a 


II 


5 


36 


640 


a 


960 


a 


J 


a a 


II 


6 


_97 


19840 


a 


19840 


a 


J 


Cross Creek Tp. 


II 


7 


3 


640 


a 


640 


a 


J 


Isl d Creek Tp. 


II 


8 


97 


19686 


a 


19686 


a 


J 


Knox and Saline 


II 


9 


13 


640 


a . 


640 


a 


J 


Saline Tp. [Tp 



fi 6 Alexander Macomb and William Edgar, of the city of New York, memorialized 
Congress, praying 

that they may be permitted to complete the payment of the purchase money of a quantity of 
land, in the territory of the United States, northwest of the river Ohio, on the original terms or 
the purchase, and to obtain a grant for the same; or, that a law may be passed for granting to 
the memorialists so much of the said land, as will be in proportion which the sum heretofore 
paid by them bears to the whole amount of the purchase money. 

The memorial was read in the House, May 13, 1796 (Journal of the House, 4th Con- 

fress, 1st Session, p. 435), and reported upon by the committee on claims, January 30, 
798 (5th Cong. 2d Sess., p. 179), and on the 30th of April following (p. 438-439) it was 
resolved in the affirmative to agree with the report, which was in part as follows: 

Several of the lots for which the petitioners made their contract having been sold at Pittsburgh, 
in pursuance of the act of the eighteenth of May, one thousand seven hundred and ninety-six, 
if the prayer of the petition should be granted, it will be necessary to indemnify the petitioners, 
by grunting other lots of equivalent value. 

But, as the petitioners have shown no reason why they did not proceed to fulfil their contract, 
excepting that their funds were otherwise employed, and as the United States must have in- 
curred considerable expenses in the negotiation when the contract was made with the petition- 
ers, the committee can find no reason why the forfeiture to which the petitioners have subjected 
themselves by the terms of their contract, should be remitted. They therefore report, as their 
opinion, that the prayer of the petition ought not to be granted." 



1911] 



First Ownership of Ohio Lands 



57 



II 
II 
II 
III 
III 
III 
III 
IV 
IV 
III 



9 

9 
9 
6 
6 
6 
8 
1 
1 
7 



14 

19 
20 
18 
30 
36 
6 
24 
34 



640 
640 

040 
640 
640 
640 
640 
640 
6:56 



acres 
u 

a 

a 

a 



a 



a 



a 



a 



— 97 19840 " 



640 

640 

640 

640 

653 

640 

640 

1380 

1590 

25420 



dollars 

a 
a 
a 



31 



.. 



.. 



a 
tt 



J 
J 
J 

B 
B 
B 

J 



a 



a 



a 



a 



a 



a 



Colerain Tp. 



.. 



.. 



a 



a 



Nathan McFfirland 



Smithfield Tp. 
M Jackson Tp. 
M " " 

B and J Colerain and Mt. 
Pleasant Tps. 
Patents 107 and 110 March 3, 1789 



a 



a 



np 
np 
np 
np 
np 
np 
np 
np 
np 
np 



II 
II 
II 
II 
II 
II 
II 

h 
ii 
ii 



npIII 
npIII 
np III 
npIII 
np III 

III 
npIII 
npIII 

IV 
np IV 

John Hopkins 
np 



7 
7 
7 
7 
7 
7 
7 
7 
9 
9 
2 
6 
6 
6 
6 
6 
8 
8 
1 
1 



(Patented except 107 and 110 to Richard Piatt) 

Q CAC\ .,^-n^c £AC\ /Inline T Tnl(l 



9 
15 
14 
20 
25 
30 
35 
36 
12 
18 
14 
1 
2 
4 
5 
7 
2 
24 
23 
28 



640 

640 

640 

640 

640 

640 

640 

640 

640 

640 

106J 

640 

640 

640 

640 

640 

640 

640 

333 

208| 



acres 
a 

a 
a 
a 



dollars 

a 



np 



I 

II 

II 

II 

II 

IV 

IV 

IV 

IV 

IV 

IV 

IV 



3 

1 
1 
1 
2 

7 
7 
7 
7 
7 
7 
7 



29 
30 
35 

15 
21 
22 

23 
24 

27 
28 



3340 
247f 
86J 
413J 

4154 
640 
640 
6 tO 
640 
640 
640 
640 



.. 



.. 



a 



a 



a 



a 



a 



a 



a 



a 



a 



a 



a 



a 



a 



acres 

a 
a 
a 
a 
a 
a 
a 
a 
a 
a 
a 



Willm. Duel-, Ks<jr. 
II 1 36 640 
II 7 33 640 

III 8 31 640 

IV 7 4 640 



acres 

u 

a 
a 



640 
640 
680 
640 

726:60 
610 
640 
640 
640 
640 

342 : 73 
640 
640 
640 
640 
640 
610 
640 
1332 
873:8 

Patents 73-82 
4488: 11 dollars 
929 : 6 



a 
a 
a 
a 
a 
a 
a 
a 
u 
a 
a 
a 
a 
a 
a 
a 
a 
a 



a 



36 
79 
53 



.. 



35 1 : 

619: 

5:;<;5 : 

640 
640 

640 
640 

6 10 

640 

640 

Patents 83-88 

6 t6 : 60 dollars 

1 3 1 3 
610 
640 



•■ i 



a 

a 
a 
a 
a 
a 
a 
a 
a 



a 



.. 



a 



Isl d Creek Tp. 



a 
a 

a 
a 
a 
a 
a 



a 



a 



a 



a 



a 



a 



a 



a 
a 
ti 
a 
a 
a 
a 



J 
J 
J 
J 
J 
J 
J 
J 

C Yellow Creek Tp 

C " « 

M Ohio Tp. 

B Pultney Tp. 

B 

B 

B 

B 

J 

J 



.. 



Pease Tp. 

a a 



Pultney Tp. 

Smithfield Tp. 
a 

M Jackson Tp. 
M " " 

March 3, 1789 
Isl d Creek Tp. 
Mead Tp. 



a 



a 



a 
a 



J 

B 
B 
B 

B Pultney Tp. 

B Richland Tp. 

B 

B 

15 

B 

Ii 

B 

B 

J 

J 

Ii 



a 

a 
u 
a 
a 
a 



a 
a 

.. 
a 
a 
a 



March 3, 1789 
Mead Tp. 
1,1" Creek Tp. 
Smithfield Tp. 
St. ( 'lairsvill i 



97 Entire townships minus the reservatio 



IV 7 9 


640 acres 


IV 7 14 


640 " 


Joseph Hardy 




III 6 6 


640 acres 


III 8 32 


640 " 


IV 1 18 


149£ " 


Willm. Bowne 98 





58 First Ownership of Ohio Lands [Jan. 

640 dollars B Richland Tp. 
640 " B " " 

Patents 89-91 March 3, 1789 

640 dollars B Pease Tp. 

640 « J Smithfield Tp. 

373 : 68 " M Jackson Tp. 

Patents 26-28 March 31, 1789 

(Entered in Schedule of Sales under the name of James Gray purchaser) 
II 7 31 640 acres 640 dollars J Isl d Creek Tp. 

II 7 32 640 " 780 " J " " " 

II 9 7 659J " 639:45 " C Saline Tp. 

John Crawford 98 Patent 29 April 1, 1789 

(Entered in Schedule of Sales under the name of James Gray purchaser) 
II 7 2 640 acres 640 dollars J Isl d Creek Tp. 

Richard Piatt 98 Patents 92-1 11 (except 107 & 110) March 3, 1789 

(Entered in Schedule of Sales under the name of Nathan McFarland 

purchaser) 

640 

640 

680 

640 

726: 60 
640 
640 
640 
640 
640 

342 : 72 
640 
640 
640 
640 
640 
640 
873:8 

Land Owners on the Muskingum 

While the first sale of lots was in progress at New York, the agents and 
directors of the Ohio Company of Associates were negotiating with the 
Committee of Congress for the purchase of the tract of land on the Mus- 
kingum River, west of the seventh range of townships. Papers were 
signed for this purchase, and for the Scioto River tract, on the 27th of 
October, 1787, and title to the property passed from the United States on 
that date. Prior to this date the Ohio Company had arranged to apportion 
the lands of their purchase among the proprietor-shareholders of the com- 
pany, in number about a thousand, one numbered subdivision in each allot- 
ment for each share. Plans were formed at a series of meetings, beginning 
August 29, 1787, and extending beyond the date of signature to July 7, 
1788, for the distribution of these shares of the lands to the proprietors by 
a method of drafts, the details of which appear in the form of resolutions 

99 These names : William Bowne, John Crawford, and Richard Piatt do not appear 
in the Schedule of Sales. 



II 


7 


9 


640 


acres 


II 


7 


15 


640 


a 


II 


7 


14 


640 


a 


II 


7 


20 


640 


a 


II 


( 


25 


640 


a 


II 


7 


30 


640 


a 


II 


WW 

i 


35 


640 


a 


II 


7 


36 


640 


a 


II 


9 


12 


640 


a 


II 


9 


18 


640 


a 


III 


2 


14 


106J 


a 


III 


6 


1 


640 


a 


III 


6 


2 


640 


a 


III 


6 


4 


640 


a 


III 


6 


5 


640 


a 


III 


8 


2 


640 


a 


III 


8 


24 


640 


a 


IV 


1 


28 


208J 


u 



dollars 


J 


Isl d Creek Tp. 


a 


J 


a 


a a 


a 


J 


a 


a a 


a 


J 


a 


a a 


a 


J 


a 


a a 


a 


J 


a 


a a 


a 


J 


a 


a a 


a 


J 


a 


a a 


a 


c 


Yellow Creek Tp. 


a 


c 


a 


ik a 


a 


M 


Ohio 


Tp. 


u 


B 


Pultney Tp. 


a 


B 


.i 


a 


a 


B 


Pease Tp. 


a 


B 


a 


a 


a 


J 


Smithfield Tp. 


a 


J 


a 


; a 


a 


M 


Jackson Tp. 



1911] Fii % st Ownership of Ohio Lands 59 



entered in the manuscript minutes of the Ohio company." 

99 The minutes of the Ohio Company of Associates are in the Library of Marietta 
College, Marietta, Ohio. Extracts covering the matter of the drafts may be found in 
a set of four page leaflets issued, without date or title, for purposes of advancing the 
sale of shares in the company. A set of these leaflets is in the Col. John May Col- 
lection, W. R. H. S., attached to Col. May's copy of Dr. Cutler's famous pamphlet 
" An Explanation of the Map which Delineates that part of the Federal Lands ..." 
Salem, 1787. References to the subdivisions of the lands and the process of drafts as 
actually carried out, taken from these sources, follow : 

(The instructions of August 30, respecting the allotments, which appear in the Massachusetts 
Gazette, Tuesday, September 11, 1787, were never carried out, but were displaced by later regu- 
lations.— A. M. D.) 

At a Meeting of the Directors and Agents of the Ohio Company, at Mr. Brackett's Tavern, 
the 21st. of November, and continued by Adjournment to the twenty-second. 

Resolved, 
That the lands of the Ohio Company be allotted and divided in the following manner; anything 
to the contrary, in former resolutions notwithstanding — Viz. 

Four thousand acres near the confluence of the Ohio and Muskingum river for a city and 
commons, and contiguous to this, one thousand lots of eight acres each, amounting to eight 
thousand acres. 

Upon the Ohio in fractional townships, one thousand lots of one hundred and sixteen and 
48/100, amounting to one hundred and sixteen thousand four hundred and eighty acres. 

In the townships on the navigable rivers, one thousand lots of three hundred and twenty 
acres, amounting to three hundred and twenty thousand acres, and, 

In the inland towns, one thousand lots of nine hundred and ninety two acres each, amounting 
to nine hundred and ninety two thousand acres, to be divided and allotted as the agents shall 
hereafter direct. 

Resolved, that the city at the mouth of the Muskingum river be so laid out into oblong 
squares, as that each house-lot shall consist of ninety feet in front, and one hundred and eighty 
feet in depth, with an alley of ten feet in width, through each square in its oblong direction; 
and that the centre street, crossing the city, be one hundred and fifty feet wide, anything to the 
contrary, in former resolutions, notwithstanding. 

Resolved, That the eight acre lots be surveyed, and a plat or map thereof be made, with 
each lot numbered thereon, by the first Wednesday in March next, and that a copy thereof, be 
immediately forwarded to the Secretary, and the original retained by the Company's Superin- 
tendant. That the Agents meet upon the same Wednesday in March, at Rice's Tavern in 
Providence, State of Rhode-Island, to draw for said lots in numbers, as the same shall be stated 
upon the plat. That a list of the draughts be transmitted by the Secretary to the Superintendant, 
and a copy thereof preserved in the Secretary's office. 

Winthrop Sargent, Sec'ry to the Ohio Company. 

At a Meeting of the Directors of the Ohio Company at Mr. Brackett's Tavern, in Boston, 
November 23, 17»7. 

For the purpose of carrying into effect the surveys and other business of the Ohio Company ; 
as agreed upon by the Directors, and Agents, at their meetings of the 29th. of August last, and 
the 21st. instant. 

Ordered, 

That Col. Ebenezer Sproat, from Rhode-Island, Mr. Anslem Tupper, and Mr. John Matthews, 
from Massachusetts, and Col. R. J. Meigs, from Connecticut, be the surveyors. 

That General Rufus Putnam, be the Superintendant of all the business aforesaid, and he is 
to be obeyed and respected accordingly. 

General Parsons in the Chair. 
General Varnum, General Tupper, Mr. Barlow, Col. May, and Capt. Heyward, were appointed 
a Committee to examine into, and report upon, the returns of the Agents. 

This Committee reported, that one thousand shares of the Ohio Company's purchase were 
taken up by the Agents, and that the drawing for the eight acre lots may commence as soon as 
the Meeting shall direct; which report was accepted and approved. 

Resolved, That the Secretary enter upon the records the number of shares in each agency. 

Resolved, That Mr. Cutler, General Parsons, Major Dexter, Col. Talmadge, and Major 
Corlis, be a Committee to prepare the names and numbers, and make all necessary arrange- 
ments for drawing the eight acre lots. 

Resolved, That the drawing shall commence tomorrow morning, at the State-House in this 
town. 

Adjourned till tomorrow morning, at 9 o'clock. 

Thursday, March 6. 

Met agreeably to adjournment. 

The committee for preparing names and numbers reported, that they had procured two boxes, 
into the one of which they had put the names of the adventurers, as returned by the Agents 
(amounting to one thousand) and into the other the numbers, from No. 1 to No. 1000 inclusive: 

That they have procured two lads to assist in drawing out the names and numbers. 

That they have appointed Colonel J. .May to receive the numbers, and call them off; and 
Major W. Sargent to receive and call off the names ; And, 

That they have appointed General H. Jackson, and Col. Talmadge, Clerks; and General B. 
Tupper to receive and string the several names and numbers together, as they shall be severally 
drawn out. 

Resolved—, That the report of the Committee be accepted and approved; and that the 
Meeting adjourn to the State-House immediately, and proceed to drawing the lots. 

Adjourned to the State- House. 

At 9 o'clock, p.m. having completed the drawing of the names and numbers (a list of which 
is with the files of the Company, in the Secretary's office) the Meeting adjourned till to-morrow 
morning, at 9 o'clock, at Mr. Rice's Tavern. 



60 First Ownership of Ohio Lands [Jan. 

Lists of the drafts kept by Col. May furnish means of obtaining the names 
of the proprietors of the Ohio Company, owners of lands on the Muskingum 
River, 1788-1792. 100 They present the drafts by name and number of the 
proprietor, the agency from which the shares were obtained, and the 
various numbers of the lots drawn against each name. An early list, 
dated 1 788, gives names about in order of the alphabet, but a later list, 
179 6, m gives data from which corrections may be made, showing changes 
of residence, assignments of title, forfeitures, etc. A list, constructed from 
these sources follows, giving names of proprietors, residence, agency and 
number of shares held, 102 the corrections taken from the attested copy being 
inserted in each case in brackets. 

Extracts from the Journal of Col. John May (Cincinnati, Robert Clarke & Co., 
1873), relating to the distribution of lots on the Muskingum : 

p. 59. [May 27, 1788] As to our surveying, buildings, etc., they are in a very backward way. 
Little appears to be done, and a great deal of time and money misspent. ... 

p. 60. [May 28, 1788] The directors and agents present agreed to lease the ministerial lot to 
different persons, in lots of ten acres each, for a term not less than one hundred years, at the 
option of the lessee — to be without rent the first ten years, and then a fixed rent the remainder 
of the time. This was done to accommodate a number of proprietors present, whose eight-acre 
lots were drawn at a distance. Went this afternoon to survey the ten-acre lots, and drew for 
them in the evening. Colonel Sproat drew No. 9; Varnum, 10; May, 11; Sargent, \2; Parsons, 

p. 63. [June 7, 1788] General Varnum and his party are making difficulties about the eight- 
acre lots not being drawn contiguous to the city; also, with respect to the Scioto purchase. 
The rations are not good. General Putnam did not strictly adhere to orders given at Brackett's 
tavern in Boston, and Rice's tavern at Providence. I think I foresee difficulties of a more 
serious nature. 

p. 65. [June 9, 1788] . . . Met to settle difficulties respecting the eight-acre lots; but we 
could not agree, and adjourned until to-morrow, at 8 o'clock a.m. . . . 

p. 66. [June 10, 1788] . . . Met this morning, according to adjournment, and after much 
debate and discussion, agreed to cut up our commons into three-acre lots, to be drawn for in 
July. This has appeased the minds of the people. We also appointed officers of police. 

p. 76. [July 2, 1788] . . . Attended myself a meeting of directors and agents, according to 
order at Providence, 8th March. Chose a committee to mnke preparation for drawing the city 
lots. Entered into several debates, and at 2 o'clock adjourned until Monday, 7th inst., at 
8 o'clock in the morning, for the purpose of drawing the city lots, and transacting such other 
business as may be thought necessary for the establishment of our infant settlement. . . . 

p. 79. [July 5, 1788] ... I am employed myself in preparing for the draughts of the city 
lots. . . . 

p. 82. [July 7, 1788] . . . We have drawn the city lots to-day. . . . 

100 Several of the official drafts, two of which are in the library of the New England 
Historic Genealogical Societv, were found in the chest of Col. John May, which, with 
its contents, is now in the Western Reserve Historical Societv. 

101 In the Col. John May collection, W. R. H. S. Attested copy of an instrument 
executed February 1, 1796, whereby agents of the Ohio Company relinquish and quit- 
claim to each proprietor the allotments made in the several drafts, viz. 

one lot of eight acres, one lot of 100 acres, 

one lot of three acres, fitVl t. . . $ one ^ ot °f 640 acres, 

one house or town lot, btn aivisi0n } one lot of 262 acres, 

one lot of 160 acres, 

102 The agencies employed in selling shares in the Ohio Company are given by full 
title in the attested copy of the deed, although appearing in earlier lists by catchword. 
A list of these agents as entered in the deed, with numbers of shares sold by each, 
follows : 

BarloAv's Agency 19 

William Corlis's Agency 108 

A Crary's Agency 71 
M. Cutler & J Dodge Agency 86 

Ephraim Cutler's Agency 13 

Eliphalet Downer's Agency 18 

N. Freeman's Agency 9 

E. Harris's Agency 31 

H. Jackson's Agency 13 

Jno May's Agency 35 

S. H. Parson's Agency 91 

R. Putnam & Co. Agency 59 

W. Sargent's Agency 148 

Sproat & Dexter's Agency 43 

Benj n Tupper's Agency 30 

Benj a Tallmadge's Agency 43 



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1911] Genealogical Research in England 63 



GENEALOGICAL EESEAECH IN ENGLAND 

Transcribed by Miss Elizabeth French, and communicated by the Committee on 

English Research 

[Continued from vol. 64, page 355] 

The "Will of Christopher Gibson [of Boston, Mass., formerly of Dorches- 
ter, Mass., undated, but after 1672]. Bequests to cousin Hopestill Foster, 
junior, and sister Foster ; cousin Thomas Dampford ; Samuel and Clement 
Maxfield ; cousin Ebenezer Williams ; Davy Jones of Dorchester ; Mr. 
Mather and Mr. Mayo ; Mrs. Powell ; brother Edward Sealle ; Garrat 
Ingram's wife Rebecca Sealle ; Gibson Farr that lives with his grandfather 
Pelton [sic, should be Preston] ; James Priest ; goodman Barker that rings 
the bell ; William Ingraham ; Alice and Ephraim Serle ; the Second 
Church of Boston ; Samuel Bedwell ; cousin Hope Foster's children Hope- 
still, junior, Elizabeth, and Mercy [sic, should be Mary] Foster ; cousin 
Joseph Alsop, junior ; Hannah Sealle ; brother James Brett [sic, should 
be Bate] and his son Samuel ; brother William Lane ; sister Snelling, " she 
with one hand " ; our sister Mansfield ; sister Foster, sister Preston, and 
sister Ingraham ; Mr. Houlsworth, a brother of our church ; John Well- 
ington's wife [Elizabeth]. " I have two honored friends that their anches- 
tors did leave good will to me, and I to them the wife of Our honored gov- 
ernor [John Leverett] and the wife of our honored magistrate Mr. [Ed- 
ward] Tyng. I do desire my executors to give each of them £5. I desire 
my honored friends would accept of it, my hearty love hath been towards 
them above this three score years." Residue to the free school in Dor- 
chester. Executors : brother-in-law Capt. Hope Foster and Daniel Preston 
and William Ingraham. Proved 12 (1) 1674-5 (Suffolk Co., Mass., 
Probate, vol. 6, p. 64). 

Sale of Chesham, Co. Bucks 

[The following genealogy of the Sale family, compiled from the registers 
of Cheshain, co. Bucks, England, explains several of the relationships ex- 
pressed in the above will, and presents the origin of several early New 
England emigrants, both male and female. Chartridge is a hamlet in the 
parish of Chesham, and Bledlow is another Bucks parish about twelve miles 
west from Chesham. E. F.] 

1. John 1 Sale "of Bledlow" married at Chesham, 27 Apr. 1562, 
Agnes Byrch, widow of William Byrch a of Chartridge in Chesham, and 
immediately settled at Chartridge, where he lived until his decease, bring 
buried 15 Nov. 1577. His widow Agnes was buried at Chesham 20 Jan. 
1599-1000. 

The Will of John Sale of Chartregge in the Countie of Bucks., Hus- 
bandman, 20 Jan. 1576-7. My body to be buried in the churchyard of 
Chessam. To the Cathedral Church of Lincken 2d. To the poor of the 
parish 3s. 4d. To the poor men's box 12d. My debts to be paid by Agnes 
my welbeloved wife, whom I make my sole executrix, she to have all my 

a William Byrch, son of John Byrch, m. at Chesham, 20 Oct. 1513, Agnes, dau. of 
George Parker, and had six children before 1560. Ilia burial is not recorded, but 
probably it was his widow who m. John 1 Sale. 



64 Genealogical Research in England [Jan. 

goods and debts toward the payment of my debts that she may bring up 
my children. I trust I have accomplished to her that before marriage was 
made for clearing of my conscience. I desire Mr. Walweyn, parson of 
Harige [Hawridge], to help my wife in her affairs and be one of my over- 
seers with my cousin John Tookfild, and to each of them 3s. 4d. I have 
left this will in the hands of Mr. Walweyn until God shall call me out of 
this wretched world. Witnesses : Willam Tompsons, John Geeford, Cle- 
ment Harrysone, Bridged Duke, with others. Proved 21 Feb. 1577-8 by 
the executrix named in the will. (Archdeaconry of Bucks, 1577, 13.) 
Children recorded at Chesham : 

2. i. Edwakd, 2 bapt. 4 Apr. 1563. 

ii. John, bapt. 26 Nov. 1564; bur. 24 Feb. 1575-6. 

iii. Joan, bapt. 13 Jan. 1565-6 ; bur. 2 Aug. 1607 ; m. 9 Feb. 1589-90, 
Geokge Littlepage. Children recorded at Chesham: 1. John, 
bapt. 31 Jan. 1590-1. 2. Daniel, bapt. 18 Feb. 1592-3. 3. Sarah, 
bapt. 13 Oct. 1594. 4. Samuel, bapt. 26 Sept. 1596. 5. Ellas, bapt. 
31 Dec. 1598. 6. Elizabeth, bapt. 13 Sept. 1601, dau. of " George 
and Elizabeth," probably a clerical error for Joane. 7. Joane, 
bapt. 2 Aug. 1607. 

iv. John, bapt. 1 Nov., bur. 1 Nov. 1567. 

v. Kichahd [probably twin of John], bur. 1 Nov. 1567. 

vi. Ellen, bapt. 7 Nov. 1568 ; bur. 24 July 1611 ; m. 12 Nov. 1599, Wil- 
liam Tiler, " late servant of Edward Sale " [her brother]. Child 
recorded at Chesham: Abigail, bapt. 20 Jan. 1604-5, m. 11 Oct. 
1632, John Meriden, and had issue. 

3. vii. Josias, bapt. 28 Oct. 1570. 

2. Edward 2 Sale {John 1 ), baptized at Chesham 4 Apr. 1563, was a 
churchwarden in 1598 and later, and was buried at Chesham 13 
Dec. 1620. He married at Chesham, 20 Oct. 1589, Elizabeth 
Gifford, daughter of John, born about 1567, buried at Chesham 
14 Aug. 1634. 

Children recorded at Chesham : 

i. Elizabeth, 3 bapt. 8 June 1590; bur. at Chesham 22 Feb. 1633-4; 
m. there, 11 Oct. 1613, William Preston, b. abt. 1590, who was a 
churchwarden at Chesham in 1617. In 1635 he m. (2) Mary Sea- 
brook, b. abt. 1600, dau. of Robert who later came to New Eng- 
land, and in Sept. 1635 came to New England in the Truelove with 
this second wife and four youngest children by his first wife, viz. 
Elizabeth, aged 11, Sarah, aged 8, Mary, aged 6, and John, aged 3 
(see Hotten's u Original Lists," p. 131). He located first at Dor- 
chester, Mass., and later settled at New Haven, Conn., where he 
had several children by his second wife, and d. abt. 1647. There 
were other Preston families at Chesham, but no connection with 
William Preston has yet been established. Children recorded at 
Chesham: 1. William, bapt. 5 Oct. 1614; bur. 4 June 1633. 2. 
John, b. abt. 1617 ; bur. 24 Nov. 1623. 3. Edward, bapt. 14 Nov. 
1619 ; preceded his father to New England, coming in the Christian 
in Apr. 1635, aged 13 [should be 15] (Hotten's ''Original Lists," 
p. 43) ; settled at New Haven, and later at Boston. 4. Daniel, 
bapt. 3 Mar. 1621-2 ; came to New England, aged 13, with his uncle 
Edward 3 Sale in the Elizabeth and Ann in Apr. 1635 (see Hotten's 
" Original Lists," p. 70), and settled at Dorchester. 5. Elizabeth, 
bapt. 23 July 1624; came to New England with her father; m. Jo- 
seph Alsop. 6. Sarah, bapt. 23 July 1626 ; came to New England 
with her father; m. William Mix. 7. Mary, bapt. 13 Dec. 1629; 
came to New England with her father. 8. John, bapt. 4 Mar. 
1631-2; came to New England with his father. 

ii. Lydia, bapt. 23 July 1592 ; bur. 16 Apr. 1600. 



1911] Genealogical Research in England 65 

iii. Abigail, bapt. 13 Feb. 1593-4. 

iv. Dorcas, bapt. 28 Feb. 1596-7 ; was probably the Dorcas Sale bur. at 
Chesham 29 Apr. 1619, although possibly this burial record may 
pertain to Dorcas Sale, dau. of Josias (3, i). 

t. Thomas, bapt, 2 Mar. 1599-1600; bur. 19 Apr. 1619. 

vi. Sarah, bapt, 6 Apr. 1602 ; m. at Chesham, 23 Aug. 1625, Christopher 
GiBSON, b who came to New England in 1630, settled first at Dor- 
chester, and later removed to Boston, where he d. 3 Oct. 1674, 
leaving a will, of which an abstract is given above. He m. (2) at 
Dorchester, Margaret Bate, dau. of James. No children by 
either wife. 

vii. Mary, bapt. 21 Oct. 1604.* 

viii. Martha, bapt. 13 Sept. 1607. 
4. ix. Edward, bapt. 24 Dec. 1609 ; emigrated to New England. 

3. Josias 2 Sale (John 1 ), baptized at Chesham 28 Oct. 1570, married 

first, 16 June 1606, Rebecca Woodhousk, baptized 20 Apr. 1584, 
daughter of Henry and Anne; and married secondly, about 1609, 

8 us ax . 

Child by first wife, recorded at Chesham : 
i. Dorcas, 8 bapt. 1 Nov.. 1607. 

Children by second wife, recorded at Chesham : 

ii. Ax.vh, bapt. 25 Nov. 1610; bur. 31 Dec. 1610. 

iii. Susan, bapt. 27 Nov. 1611; bur. 24 Feb. 1612-13. 

iv. Abigail, bapt. 25 July 1613. 

v. Susan, bapt. 19 Mar. 1614-15. 

vi. Elizabeth, bapt. 5 Mar. 1616-17. 

vii. Hannah, bapt. 21 Mar. 1618-19. 

viii. Josias, bapt. 19 May 1622. 

4. Edward 8 Sale (Edward, 2 John 1 ), baptized at Chesham 24 Dec. 

1609, came to New England in the Elizabeth and Ann in Apr. 1 635, 

aged 24 (Ilotten's "Original Lists," p. 70), bringing with him his 

nephew Daniel Preston. He was at Marblehead a short time, and of 

Weymouth in 1637, whence he removed to Rehoboth about 1643, 

but later returned to Weymouth, where he died about 1602. lie 

married in New England, about 1636, Margaret , who died 

at Rehoboth 13 July 1664. 

Children, born in New England: 

i. Ephraim, 4 bapt. at Hingham in May 1638. 

ii. Obediah, bapt. at Weymouth 26 July KM0. 

iii. Robert. 

iv. Rebecca, m. at Boston, 28 May 1662, Jarrat Lnoraham. 

v. [riam, m. at Rehoboth, 10 Feb. 1663-4, Welliam Carpenter. 

vi. Nathaniel, d. at Weymouth 11 Dee. 171 1. 

Gipford 

John Giffobd, bricklayer, was buried at Chesham 30 Dec. 160"). His 
wife Joane was buried there 12 Oct. 1620. 
Children recorded at Chesham : 

i. Elizabeth, b. abt. 1567; m. at Chesham, 20 Oct. 1589, Edwai 

Sale. 
ii. Thomas, bapt. 28 Aug. 1569; m. at Chesham, 25 Sept. 1692, A- 

Dell, dau. of Robert; seven children, bapt. al Chesham. 

h At Wendover, Bucks, seven miles from Chesham, is recorded larriage of n 

Christopher Gibson and Susan Armitage, 20 Sept. 1624. [fthis In- an earlier marri 
of our emigrant, thi.-> wife must have died vi n Boon. E. I'. 

cDid she in. (1) John Gove, and (2) John DlANSPIBLD of Charlestown, Ma.*- 



66 Genealogical Research in England [Jan. 

iii. Richard, bapt. 2 Dec. 1571 ; bur. 12 June 1580. 

iv. Ciceley, bapt. 7 Mar. 1573-4; bur. there 26 Oct. 1630; m. at Ches- 
haui, 17 Jan. 1602-3, Thomas Tookefield, a weaver, who was 
bur. there 11 Dec. 1636; four children, bapt. at Chesham. 

v. John, bapt. 12 Aug. 1576; bur. 14 June 1580. 

vi. Robert, bapt. 5 Oct. 1578; m, abt. 1610, Alice ; nine chil- 
dren recorded at Chesham. 

vii. Mary, bapt. 19 Mar. 1580-1 ; m. at Chesham, 26 Sept. 1603, Thomas 
Cleydon, a weaver; eight children, bapt. at Chesham. 

viii. Jonas, bapt. 5 July 1584 ; bur. at Chesham 27 Sept. 1616 ; m. there, 
14 July 1608, Mary Toppam ; five children, bapt. at Chesham. 

[The foregoing material makes public for the first time the English home 
of Christopher Gibson, Edward Sale, and William Preston, early settlers 
of New England ; gives possible clues to the origin of Robert Seabrook, 
James Priest, Richard Ingraham, and John Gove, other early emigrants ; 
and with other data enables us to understand nearly all the relationships 
expressed in the will of Christopher Gibson in 1674. The latter came 
with Winthrop in 1630, was a soap-boiler by occupation, and a man of 
substance ; and, although he had no children, his name survives among us 
to this day in the " Christopher Gibson School " and the " Christopher 
Gibson Playground " in Dorchester, as memorials of his legacy to the free 
school in that town. 

Having no relatives here and no children of his own, Gibson made be- 
quests to various relatives of his two wives, calling them his kinsfolk. 
" Sister Foster " was Mary Bate, born 1619, wife of Capt. Hopestill Fos- 
ster, daughter of James Bate and sister of Margaret Bate, second wife of 
Gibson. " Cousin Hopestill Foster jun. " was her son. " Cousin Thomas 
Dampford " was Thomas 3 Danforth, Jr., born in 1654, son of Hon. Thomas 
and Mary (Withington) Danforth, whose aunt Anne Withington married 
James Bate, Jr., brother to Margaret Bate, second wife of Gibson. " Cou- 
sin Ebenezer Williams " was son of Roger Williams of Dorchester by wife 
Lydia Bate, sister of Gibson's second wife. " Brother Edward Sealle " 
was brother of Sarah Sale, first wife of Gibson. " Ephraim Serle " and " Re- 
becca Sealle, wife of Garrat Ingram," were children of said Edward Sale ; 
and " Alice Serle " was wife of Ephraim and " Hannah Sealle," their 
daughter. " William In°raham " was brother of Garrat Ingraham. " Gib- 
son Farr," born in 1666, was son of Eleazer Farr, who married Mary 
Preston, daughter of Daniel Preston and granddaughter of William Pres- 
ton, who married Elizabeth Sale, sister of Gibson's first wife. " Cousin 
Joseph Alsoj) jr." was son of Joseijh Alsop, who married Elizabeth Pres- 
ton, daughter of William Preston, who married Elizabeth Sale. " Brother 
James Brett " means James Bate, Jr., brother of Gibson's second wife. 
" Sister Mansfield " seems to refer to Mary, wife of John Mansfield of 
Boston, formerly wife of John Gove ; possibly she was Mary Sale, born 
in 1604, sister of Gibson's first wife. How William Lane was "brother " 

to Gibson is not clear. " Sister Snelling " must refer to Sarah , 

who married, about 1656, John Snelling of Boston, but her connection with 
Gibson is not apparent. A James Priest was baptized at Chesham 5 Nov. 
1610, son of Abraham and Elizabeth (Nuens) Priest ; perhaps he was our 
emigrant of Weymouth in 1640 and the legatee of Gibson's will. The name 
Ingraham is common in Bucks, and it may be found that Richard Ingra- 
ham, father of William and Garrat, came from that county. Elizabeth, 
" John Wellington's wife," was daughter of Daniel Preston and grand- 
daughter of William Preston. 



1911] Genealogical Research in England 67 

Of Gibson's " honored friends," Gov. Leverett's wife, Sarah Sedgewick, 
belonged to a family located at Woburn, co. Beds, and Edward Tyng's wife 
was Mary Sears, daughter of Francis Sears of Layton Buzzard, co. Beds. 
These places are but five miles apart and about twenty miles north of 
Chesham ; and Christopher Gibson probably originated in their vicinity. 

Heretofore it has always been supposed that William Preston came from 
Giggleswick in Yorkshire, where he aj3pears to have had property. This 
place is over two hundred miles north of Chesham, where it now appears 
he certainly lived for over twenty years before emigrating to America. 

The registers of Chesham show the marriage, on 10 June 1630, of 
Zachariah Whitman and Sarah Biscoe, baptized at Chesham 9 Nov. 1606, 
daughter of Richard and Martha Biscoe. This couple are evidently the 
Zacharia Whitman, aged 40, and wife Sarah, aged 25, who came to New 
England in the Truelove in Sept. 1635, the same ship that brought William 
Preston from Chesham. This Zachariah Whitman was a brother of John 
Whitman of Weymouth, ancestor of most of the Whitmans of America. 
Research in Bucks may unearth the Whitman ancestry. J. G. Bartlett.] 

Sale of Bledow, Co. Bucks 

[The two following wills are the earliest testaments in the Archdeaconry 
of Bucks of the Sales of Bledlow. A study of these wills and the extracts 
from the registers indicate that both testators were born not far from 1545, 
and so probably were of a later generation than the first John Sale, who 
settled in Chesham, and whose wife was born about 1525. It is likely that 
Amy Sale, the testatrix of 1 608, was widow of a brother of James Sale, 
the testator of 1608. There are several wills of descendants at Bledlow 
of James Sale, and also of Amy Sale, but they throw no light on the Sale 
family of Chesham, which furnished the emigrant to New England.] 

The Will of James Sale sen. of Bledlowe in the County of Bucks., 
yeoman, 17 Jan. 1608. To be buried in the parish of Bledlowe. To the 
poor of the parish 20s. To son Thomas Sale £20, to be paid by my son 
Rowland Sale one year after my decease if he or his lawful deputy shall 
come to my dwelling house to demand it. To sons Richard, Edward and 
William £20 apiece, to be paid by my son Rowland as they shall come to 
the age of twenty-one. To son Raphe £20, to be paid by son James one 
year after his apprenticeship shall be set forth. To daughter Katherine, 
wife of Christopher Bigge, £10. To daughter Ursula £30 at twenty-one. 
To daughter Alice, wife of Robert Cattle, 40s. To daughters Isabell, wife 
of James Steevens, and Elizabeth, wife of John Steevens, and Phillip, 
wife of John Towne, 20s. each. To son Rowland various household goods, 
etc., to be used equally by wife and son Rowland, with reversion to Row- 
land on the death of my wife, in consideration of the use of £10 belonging 
to said Rowland's wife, on which sum I have not paid for use. To son 
John. To son James the crop growing in Mausley, if I die before harvest 
next. To children Ralphe, Richard, Edward, William, and Ursula. To 
each of my children's children. I forgive my brother Henry and my bro- 
ther Edward Holt the debts they owe me. My executrix to pay my sister 
Elizabeth Greenwood's rent for the church house. Residue of goods and 
chattels unbequeathed to wife Elizabeth, who is made sole executrix on 
condition that she keep herself a widow. If she marry, tin- residue to be 
equally divided between children Raphe, Richard, Edward, William, and 
Ursula at the appointment of my overseers, Richard Chitch and Edward 

VOL. lxv. 5 



68 Genealogical Research in England [Jan. 

Steevens, to whom 6s. 8d. each. Witnesses : Richard Chitche, Edward 
Steevens, and others. Proved 6 Apr. 1609 by the executrix named. 
(Archdeaconry of Bucks, 1608.) 

The Will of Amey Sale of Bledlowe ridge in the parish of Bledlowe 
in the County of Bucks., widow, 30 Jan. 1608. To be buried in the par- 
ish church yard of Bledlowe. To son Raphe one cow, and to his two chil- 
dren 20s. apiece. To daughter Elizabeth Francklin one cow, and to each 
of her four children 20s. apiece. To daughter Cicelye one cow. To James 
Sale, son of Richard Sale, 20s. and six sheep, and to his other four children 
20s. apiece. To Elizabeth and Anne Sale, the two daughters of Richard 
Sale, a pewter platter each. All the residue of my goods unbequeathed to 
my son James, whom I make sole executor. I owe £10 to my son-in-law 
Rowland Sale. Witnesses : Thomas Carter, Gilles Floid, and James Sale. 
Proved 30 June 1609 by the executor named in the will. (Archdeaconry 
of Bucks, 1609, 88.) 

[The early parish registers of Bledlow are missing, and the Archdeacon's 
Transcripts give only one year before 1600, and after that about every alter- 
nate year. The following Sale entries have been gleaned from these Trans- 
cripts in the Archdeaconry of Bucks :] 

1595 Jane, daughter of Henry Sale, bapt. 22 July 
1602 Helen, wife of Henry Sale, buried 10 March 

1604 Richard, son of Richard Sale, bapt. 23 Sept. 
John Towne and Phillipa Sale married 2 July 
Richard Sale buried 24 May 

1605 Raphe Sale and Alice Costard married 22 July 

1606 James, son of Raphe Sale, bapt. 4 May 

1607 William, son of Raphe Sale, bapt. 20 Mar. [1607-8] 
Elizabeth, daughter of Henry Sale, buried 19 April 
Thomas Bigge and Elizabeth Sale married 8 Jan. [1607-8] 

1608 Henry Sale and Editha Fellowe married 30 May 
James Sale Sen. buried 23 Feb. 

Amey Sale, widow, buried 16 Mar. 
1610 Anne, daughter of Rowland Sale, bapt. 8 July 
Jane, daughter of Ralphe Sale, bapt. 5 Oct. 

1612 James, son of James Sale, bapt. 17 May 

1613 John and William, sons of James Sale, bapt. 20 Aug. 
William, son of James Sale, buried 21 Nov. 

1615 Thomas, son of James Sale Jun., bapt. 28 Sept. 
Rowland Sale buried 13 May 

1616 Rowland, son of James Sale, Jun., bapt. 16 Mar. [1616-17] 
Henry Sale buried 9 Jan. [1616-17] 

1618 James, son of James Sale, bap. 22 Feb. 

Edward Horseman and Ursula Sale married 2 Feb. 
1621 Elizabeth, daughter of James Sale, Jun., bapt. 27 Apr. 
1(>23 Elizabeth, dau. of James Sale, bapt. 16 Nov. 
1624 Ralph, son of James Sale, bapt. 30 Jan. 

1 627 Mary, daughter of James Sale, bapt. 23 July 

1628 Anne, daughter of William Sale, bapt. 10 Sept. 
Mary, 'daughter of James Sale, bapt. 20 Oct. 
Anne Sale buried 1 Nov. 

Ralph Sale buried 20 Feb. [1628-9] 



1911] Genealogical Research in England 69 

1629 Henry and Anne Sale married 20 Jan. 

1631 Margaret, daughter of James Sale, bapt. 10 June 
William Sale and Mary Felloe married 4 Dec. 

1633 William, son of William Sale, Jun., bapt. 16 Aug. 

1634 Edward, son of William Sale, bapt. 6 Jan. 

1638 Edward, son of Edward Sale, bapt. 30 Jan. 
Alice, wife of Ralph Sale, buried 3 Sept. 

1639 Sicely Sale widow buried 26 Dec. 

16[fom] Edward, son of William Sale, Sen., bapt. 16 May 
Edward, son of William Sale, buried 14 May \_sic~] 

Bradstreet of Gislingham, Co. Suffolk 

The Will of Elenor Bradstrete, late the wife of Symond Bradstrete 
of Gislighm in the County of Suffolk and Diocese of Norwyche, widow, 
1 Sept. 1556. My body to be buried in the churchyard of Gyslynghm or 
else where it shall please God to appoint my death, to the high altar of 
which church for tythes and oblations negligently forgotten I give 20s. 
To my poor neighbors in Gyslynghm 20s. To the repairing of the highways 
of Gyslynghm 20s. To son Rychard Bradstrete £5, to be paid in three 
years, etc. To daughter Johan Muskett £3, to be paid her within four years 
after my decease, etc. To daughter Cycelye Wayge £3, to be paid in four 
years after my death, etc. To son-in-law Symond Smyth otherwise Stay- 
nor various articles and 40s. To my goddaughter Johan Smyth ats Staynor 
20s., to be paid within three years after my decease, etc. To my godson 
Thorns Smyth ats Staynor 20s., etc. To Isabell Smyth ats Staynor 20s., 
etc. To John Bradstrete, my godson, 6s. 8d., to be paid within four years 
after my decease. Item, that my son John Bradstreat oweth unto me 
£30, whereof I give unto him £3, and all the rest I will that he shall pay 
to mine executor within two years next after my death. All my goods 
unbequeathed to be equally divided among my three children, Rychard 
Bradstreat, Johan Muskett, and Cycelye Wage. I make my trusty friends 
and sons-in-law, Symond Smyth ats Staynor and Willy m Muskett, executors. 
Witnesses : Thomas Nuttall, parson, Wyllym Muskett, and Rotjt Wage. 
Proved 18 Jan. 1556[-7] by the executors named in the will. (Archdea- 
conry of Sudbury (Bury St. Edmonds), More, 109.) 

The Will of Robert Bradstret of Skole in the County of Norfolk, 
yeoman, 6 Aug. 1553 [dated at the end 11 Aug. 1553]. My free and 
copyhold tenements and lands in Larlingford to be sold by Hellenor Brad- 
street, widow, my mother, Anne my wife, John Clement of Stoke, yeoman, 
and Thomas Disney of Thorpe (or some of them), and of the money so 
arising I give to my said mother £20 and my sorrel 1 bald mare. To Anne 
my wife £15. To my brother-in-law Robert Wage £7, to my brother 
Richard £3, and to my brother Sir Thomas pryst 40s. To mending the 
highways in Gislingham 20s. To the poor man's box there 2s. To 
mending the highways in Skole 6s. 8d. To John Bradstreet, my godson, 
5s. To every other of my brother John's children .'5s. 4d. To my brother- 
in-law John Pygott 26s. tfd. To every of my brother Steynera children 
20d. To every one of my sisters, that is Johane and Cecilie, LOs. To 
Richard Buxton 5s. To Thomas Baxtere 7s., and for a mare 18s. 4d. 
To Sherewood of Svleham for barke 20-,. To John Harrys of Stowmarket 
for "fattes" 22s. 4d. To John Buddall of Wickham Skeith 40s. To 
Thomas Wyldesmythe for " shoinge " 12d. To Richard Newport 8d. I 



70 Genealogical Research in England [Jan. 

owe Nicholas Knyvett of Eye 10s. To Hellenor my mother and Anne 
my wife £60 out of the purchase money in lands in Gislingham, to be paid 
by an indenture by John Bradstreet my brother, and the other £40, when 
paid by the said John, to be used in settling my debts. To Anne my wife 
my bay mare, five combes each of rye and barley, all my bark and fats, 
and all the residue to her, except one bed which my mother gave me, which 
shall be at her pleasure. To my maid Elizabeth Passaman 10s. To John 
Rising and John Tebolde 20d. each. Executors : Thomas Disney, John 
Clement, Hellenor my mother, and Anne my wife, and to each of them 
6s. 8d. Witnesses : Thomas Caron ats Cooke, Henry Fuller, John Tebold, 
John Rising, and Thomas Lyveryche. Proved 11 Nov. 1553. (Consistory 
of Norwich, Wilkyns, 131.) 

The Will of John Bradstreate of Gislingham in the County of 
Suffolk and Diocese of Norwich, yeoman, 2 May 1559. My body to be 
buried in the church yard of Gislingham or else where it shall please God 
to appoint my death. To the high altar of the church of Gislingham for 
my tythes and oblations, negligently forgotten, 20d. To my wife Johane, 
for the term of twelve years after my decease, all my lands and tenements 
both free and copy, with their appurtenances, lying in Gislingham and 
Thornham magna, and also all my moveable goods, etc., she to pay all 
such rents and duties as belong to the lord of the fee and keep my houses 
in good and sufficient reparation. Also that she pay to my brother-in-law 
Robert Wage £20, and shall pay all my other debts and also to my daugh- 
ters Margaret, Alice, and Marie Bradstreate £6 13s. 4d. and two "able 
mylche kine " apiece, to each 5 marks and a cow at the age of twenty- 
three, and the same at the age of twenty-four, or else the whole legacy at 
marriage. At the end of the said term of twelve years my wife shall have 
the parlor and two little chambers at the east end of my house with free 
ingate and outgate and sufficient fuel brought her home, and two neat kine 
with winter meat and summer meat and 20s. in money paid her by my son 
Humfrey yearly during her natural life, also a hog every year out of my 
son Humfrey's hogs. To son Humfrey Bradstreat and his heirs male all 
my house that I now dwell in with all my lands both free and copy in 
Gislingham and Thornham magna, he to enter on them at the end of the 
said twelve years. But if he die without lawful male issue, then I give 
them to my son Simond Bradstreate and his heirs male. My son Humfrey 
shall pay to his three sisters, Elizabeth, Anne, and Dorothie, £6 13s. 4d. 
and two milch kine apiece at such times as are appointed for my other 
daughters to receive their portions. After the term of twelve years my 
tenements named Raffe yeastes and Taylors to be taken by my executors 
for the space of five years, out of the which tenements I will that my son 
Thomas Bradstreat shall have £20, to be paid £5 a year for four years, the 
which tenements I give to Symonde Bradstreat, my son, to enter thereupon 
at the end of the seventeen yeares next after my decease. If son Thomas 
die before the legacy be fully satisfied, any part remaining unpaid to be 
equally divided among my three sons, Humfrey, John, and Symonds Brad- 
streat. I will that my son Humfrey shall keep his brother John Bradstreat 
during his life with sufficient meat, drink, apparel, and lodging, or else cause 
him to be brought up withal and taught some such occupation as he may 
therewith at least be able to get his living. All such poor people and 
others as shall repair to my burial shall have penny dole dealt them by my 
executors, whom I make my wife Johane Bradstreat and Thomas Nuttall, 



1911] Genealogical Research in England 71 

Clarke, parson of Gislingham, "desireinge them of all frendshipp and 
charitye to see all thinges in my laste will and testamente gformd in suche 
sorte as maie be to the glorie of all mightie god the gferment of my soule, 
helthe & discharge of ther owne conscience amen." Witnesses : Thorns' 
Nuttall, John freman, Thomas Hastinge, Richard Buxton, Charles Belfelde, 
and Nicholas Ilubberte. Proved at Wyckhmskyeth 20 Oct. 1559 by Mr. 
Thomas Nuttall, one of the executors, the relict Johanna, the other executor, 
resigning her right. On 27 Sept. 1565 Mr. Thomas Nuttall resigned his 
rights of executorship. (Archdeaconry of Sudbury (Bury St. Edmunds), 
Sparrowe, 338.) 

The Will of Humfrey Bradstreete of Gislingham in the County of 
Suffolk, yeoman, 21 July 1618. All my moveable goods of what nature 
soever to m\ wife Awdrye, and what remains after her decease I give to 
my son Christopher. I make my wife sole executrix. [Signed] The marke 
of Humi'n \ Bradstreete. Witnesses : George Grundey and John Locke. 
Proved 15 Dec. 1618 by the executrix named in the will. (Archdeaconry 
of Sudbury (Bury St. Edmunds), Gibson, 221.) 

The Will of William Bradstrett junior of Eye in the County of 
Suffolk, linen weaver, 29 Apr. 1627. I desire the close and piece of land 
which I late bought of William Elliotte in Eye, and the parcel of land 
called the Oakes of two and a half acres, all my linen, cloth, wares, yarns, 
looms, and other things belonging to my trade, my household stuff and 
moveables, be sold to pay my debts. To sister Awdrye Bradstreete £5. 
Mary Bradstreet sole executrix, and Richard Rowninge of Eye supervisor. 
Witnesses : Thomas Maryotte, Thomas Gissinge, William Huntinge, and 
John Bio we. Proved 13 June 1627 by the executrix named in the will. 
(Consistory of Norwich, 1627, 266.) 

[Of the foregoing Bradstreet testators, Eleanor Bradstreet, the testatrix 
of 1556, was mother of Robert Bradstreet, the testator of 1553, and of John 
Bradstreet, the testator of 1550, the latter being father of Humphrey Brad- 
street, the testator of 1618. William Bradstreet, Jr., the testator of 1627, 
was probably son of William and grandson of the above Humphrey. E. F.] 

Bradstreet entries from the Parish Registers of Gislingham, 

Co. Suffolk 

Baptisms 

1567 Jone Bradstret \ <• daughter of homfrye Bradstrete was bapt y e xxx th 

Daye of March beinge Ester Daye 

1568 Thomas Bradstret was bapt y e xxiiij" 1 of June [probably son of 

Humfrey] 

1571 John Bradstrett ye MBSfi of Homfrye Bradstrete was bapt y 1 ' u\] ih 

daye of Marche 

1572 Jone Bradstret daughter of homfrye Bradstrete was bapt ye 

Daye of 

1573 Anne Bradstret vrai bapl wiij" 1 of Decembr 

1574 Willam Bradstn ime [xxx ,h ] daye of Januarie in 

\'' xvii Ml yere of quene Elizabethe 

1575 Alice Bradsta flaagkter of homfrye Bradstrete was bapt y B 

wi" 1 of February i 

1576 Rachel! Bra y e .\ii Ul of Septembar 



72 Genealogical Research in England [Jan. 

Marriages 

1564 Hoinffye Bradstreet & Awdrye Straketon were rnaryed y e xxij th 

daye of Octobre 
1597 Nicholas Brett & Jone Brads trete were maryed y e xxvi th daye of 

inaye 

Burials 

1559 John Bradstrete yeoman was buryed the xx th daye of June 

1561 Dorothie Bradstrete was buried y e x th of octobre 

1573 Anne Bradstrete ye daughter of honifrye bradstrete was buryed y e 

xij th of februarye [1573-4] 
1618 Humfrey Bradstreet was buryed August y e vii lh 
1622 Christopher Bradstreet was buried Octob 1 " xix lh 
1625 John Bradstrete brother to homfrye bradstrete was buryed ye v th of 

marche 

Bradstreet of Capel, etc., Co. Suffolk 

The Will of John Bradstreete of Capell in the County ot Suffolk, yeo- 
man, 25 Feb., 6 James I [1609]. To wife Anne Bradstreete my messuage 
or tenement with all the lands meadows and pastures thereunto belonging in 
Bentlye, to have and to hold until my son John attain unto the age of 
twenty-one, and then to him and his heirs forever. To my son John £40 
at his age of twenty-one, and a bedstead, etc., my wife to have the use of 
them during her life. To wife Ann my tenement and ground called Big- 
gins, in Capell, to have and to hold until my son Robert attain his age of 
twenty-one, and then to him and his heirs forever. To son Robert £80 at 
his age of twenty-one, and a bedstead, etc., wife Anne to have the use of 
it for life. To brother Thomas Bradstreete £30, a posted bed, etc. To 
nephew Humfrey Bradstreete £5 at twenty-one. To Rose Barker and 
Daniell Barker, children of Daniell Barker, 50s. each at twenty-one. If 
either die before that age, reversion to the survivor. To the poor of the 
parish of Capell 40s. The residue of all goods, cattle, chattels, household 
stuff, utensils, and moveables unbequeathed, to wife Anne, whom I make 
sole executrix. Anthony Rivers, my uncle, and Willm Blosse, my brother- 
in-law, supervisors. If wife marry during minority of sons, she to give 
bonds for the payment of their legacies. [Signed] The niarke of John 
Bradstreete. Witnesses : Anthony Rivas, John Thome, and John Baker. 
Proved 28 Sept. 1610 by the relict Anne, the executrix named in the will. 
(P. C. C, Wingfield, 82.) 

The Will of Robert Bradstreete of Bently in the County of Suffolk, 
singleman, 15 Apr. 1654. To Robert Bradstreete, my kinsman, the son 
of my brother John Bradstreete, and to his heirs forever, all my lands in 
Bently both freehold and copyhold: To John Bradstreete, the son of 
Henry Bradstreete, my kinsman, £5 to be paid to him when twenty-one. 
To Rose Cobbald, my maidservant, 40s. if she be in my service at my 
death. The residue of all my goods and chattels unbequeathed, together 
with my household stuff, stock, corn, cattle, ready money, debts, and all 
other things belonging to me, to my kinsman Robert Bradstreete, son of 
my brother John Bradstreete, towards the payment of my debts, legacies 
and funeral expenses, and I make him my sole executor. [Signed] Robert 
Bradstret. [Seal with four bars.] Witnesses: John Rewse, Cler., and 
rlie niarke of Thomas Smith. (Archdeaconry of Suffolk (Ipswich), 1663, 
143.) 



1911] Genealogical Research in England 73 

The Will of John Bradstrete Sen of Capell in the County of Suffolk, 
yeoman, aged and crazy in body, etc., 8 Aug. 1664. To son John Brad- 
strete his heirs and assigns forever, all my lands and tenements in Capell 
with their appurtenances, and a two and twenty shilling piece of gold. To 
Judith Bradstreete, his wife, my daughter-in-law, a two and twenty shilling 
piece of gold. To John Bradstreete, my grandchild. To Judith Brad- 
streete and Dorcas Bradstrete, my grandchildren, each 10s., etc., at twenty- 
one or day of marriage. To Mary Bradstreet, my grandchild, at twenty- 
one years or day of marriage. To my son Robert Bradstreet and his heirs 
forever, all the land and tenements lying in Bently, a piece of gold of two 
and twenty shillings, etc., on condition that he shall acquit his grandmother's 
legacy. Whereas my son Robert hath in his possession two silver spoons 
and two eleven shilling pieces of gold that are my grandchild John Brad- 
strete's, the son of Henry Bradstrete, already, my son Robert shall give a 
bond of £20 unto my executor for the delivering of them to my said grand- 
child at twenty-one, if the said John be then living. To grandchild John 
Bradstrete, son of Henry Bradstrete, the bed as it standeth whereon I now 
lie, viz. one bedstead, one featherbed, one feather bolster, four feather 
pillows, one flock bolster, one flock bed, four blankets, one coverlet and 
three blankets, also one two and twenty shilling piece of gold, a five shilling 
piece of silver and a pair of holland sheets, all to be paid at twenty-one 
years. All the rest of my goods and chattels unbequeathed to my son John 
Bradstrete, whom I make my executor, in consideration that he shall see 
my body decently buried and my will faithfully performed. [ Signed] John 
Bradstre. [Sealed with a signet ring engraved with a B.] Witnesses : 
Samuel Hudson and Mary Sexten, her mark. Proved 1 Oct. 1664 by 
John Bradstreete, the executor named in the will. (Archdeaconry of 
Suffolk (Ipswich), 1664, 70.) 

The Will of Jciin Bradstreet of Little Wenham in the County of 
Suffolk, yeoman, 9 Jan. 1678. To wife Judith land in Little Wenham 
bought of William Urewse, esquire, deceased. To son John at twenty-one, 
lands in Capell. To son Robert at twenty-one, lands in Dedham in the 
County of Es* t, vrhicfc were my father-in-law, John Creakes. To my five 
daughters, Judith, Dorcas, Mary, Sarah, and Elizabeth, £100 each when 
ntv-one. To 1 o \ i i if brother Robert Bradstreet lands in Bently pur- 
chased of William B , in Wenham called Millfeilds and Millfeild 
Rowea purchased of William Brewse, and lands in Cobdock purchased of 
Michael! Burkei. Wife Judith executrix. [Signed] John Bradstreet. 
Witnesses: Witt Byet', John Rundell, and the marke of Mary Steuens. 
Proved 22 Feb. 1(178 bv the executrix named in the will. (Archdeaconry 
of Suffolk (Ipswich), Edgar, *o-7.) 

Fkom Piiillimokk's Suffolk Maimiiages, Vol. I. 

Cupel 

Robtus Brunning & Elizabeth Hradstret, 34 Klizabeth [1501-2] 

John Bradstreet & Anno Edwards, 'J Sept. 1592 

William Lewes & Aim Bradstreete, widow, 17 Dec. 1G09 

Jolm Bradstreete & liaiy Patriche, 5 Nov. 1017 

John Bradstreet of Cape! & Judith Creake of Dedham, 22 Dec. 1653 

Little Wenham 

Edward Beast, bachelor, tv 3araa Bradstreet, spinster, both of Capell, 20 
June 1689 



74 Genealogical Research in England [Jan. 

Great Wenham 
Samuel Cooke & Dorcas Bradstreet, 28 Sept. 1682 

[The will of John Bradstreet of Capel, dated 1610, mentions a nephew 
Humphrey Bradstreet, probably the emigrant Humphrey Bradstreet, aged 
40, who came in 1634 from Ipswich in the ship Elizabeth with wife Bridget 
and children Hannah, John, Martha, and Mary. It will be remembered 
that Isaac Mixer and his family, who came in the same ship, were also 
from Capel (Register, vol. 63, p. 277). I believe John of Capel, the 
testator of 1610, and his brother Thomas (probably father of Humfrey), to 
be the sons of that name born to Humfrey Bradstreet of Gislingham in 
1568 and 1571. I also believe that the son Simon Bradstreet, mentioned 
in the will of John Bradstreet of Gislingham in 1559, was the father of 
Rev. Simon Bradstreet and grandfather of Governor Simon Bradstreet. 
It is known that the Governor's father, Rev. Simon, born about 1565-70, 
was a minister and held a living at Horbling, Lincolnshire, where the Gov- 
ernor was born in 1603, and that before this he held a living at Hinderclay, 
co. Suffolk, which is only live miles from Gislingham. (For the will of 
Rev. Simon Bradstreet of Horbling see Register, vol. 48, p. 170.) There 
were Bradstreet families at Buxhall and vicinity, but there is no apparent 
connection with the Gislingham and Capel families. E. F.] 

[The above suggestion, that Humphrey Bradstreet, nephew of John of 
Capel, the testator of 1610, was the emigrant to New England, seems 
probably correct. It seems unlikely, however, that John of Capell, who died 
in 1610, was identical with John, born in 1571, the son of Humphrey of 
Gislingham. Capel, Bentley, and Wenham are adjacent parishes in Suf- 
folk, about five miles southwest of Ipswich, and Gislingham is some thirty 
miles north of them. A Robert Bradstreet was taxed in Capel, and a 
Henry Bradstreet in Bentley, in the Suffolk Subsidy of 1568, and it is 
likely that one of these, probably Robert, was the father of John of Capel, 
the testator of 1610. In the Suffolk Subsidy of 1524 an Edmund Brad- 
strett and an Edmund Bradstet junior were assessed at Bentley. 

The suggested line of ancestry of Gov. Bradstreet seems reasonable, and 
it is to be hoped that further evidence on this line may be found. 

The Suffolk Subsidy for 1327 has but three mentions of Bradstreet in 
the whole county : Roger de Bradestret of Combs, Hugo de Brastrete of 
Great Finborough, and William de Brakstrete of Creeting. 

These three parishes are contiguous and adjacent to Buxhall, which is 
in the centre of Suffolk and just half way between Gislingham and Capel. 
It therefore seems likely that the Bradstreet family originated near Bux- 
hall, and that in the fifteenth century branches spread north some fifteen 
miles to Gislingham and south an equal distance to Capel. 

J. G. Bartlett.] 

The W T ill of George Barrell of St. Michael's, South Elinham, in the 
County of Suffolk, carpenter, 27 May 1620. My body to be buried in the 
churchyard of St. Michael's. To my wife Dorathy, during her natural 
life, my tenement called Austers with the appurtenances, and after her 
decease son George Barrell, " his heires, executors, or assignes, he or they 
paieinge & perforating all such legacies and bequestes as are hereafter in 
this my Will specified and declared." To daughter Pollen, wife of Jacob 
Barrell of Layston, blacksmith, £10 to be paid out of my tenement as fol- 
lows in four equal parts of 50s., each to be paid one 3 r ear, three years, five 
years, and six years after the death of my wife. If said Ellen die before 



1911] Genealogical Research in England 75 

her legacy be fully paid, any part remaining unpaid to be equally divided 
among her children then living, at such time as she should have received it. 
To daughter Alice £5, to be paid as follows, 50s. two years after her mother's 
death and 50s. at the end of four years, also a boarded coat and furniture. 
To John Barrell of the City of Norwich, my grandchild, £5 eight years after 
the decease of his grandmother. To grandchild John Barker £5 twelve years 
after the decease of his grandmother. If daughter Alice or grandchild 
John Barker die before legacies in money be paid in part or whole, rever- 
sion to the survivor, at the times before specified. I do ordain Dorathy, 
my wife, and George, my son, executors of this my will, and give them all 
the residue of my movable goods, household stuff, and timber unbequeathed, 
with the debts to me owing, they paying the following bequests out of my 
moveable goods : " to George £1 to be raised out of y e aforesaid moueables 
and paid him within twoe yeares next followinge after my Decease." To 
daughters Ellen and Alice £10 apiece in two years after my decease. Up- 
on receipt of the said legacy the said George, Ellen, and Alice shall stand 
bound by an obligation for the payment of 10s. a year to their said mother, 
to be paid at the usual feasts of the year, for her better maintenance. Ex- 
ecutors charged with the payment of debts and funeral charges. Witnesses : 
Roger Wood and William Norman. Proved at Beccles 3 June 1620 by 
George Barrell, one of the executors named in the will, with power re- 
served for the relict, being the other executor. (Archdeaconry of Suffolk, 
(Ipswich), 1620, 36.) 

The will of Jacob Barrell of Layston in the County of Suffolk, black- 
smith, 13 May 1621. To wife Hellen all my houses and lands for her 
natural life, she bringing up my children in the nurture and fear of God. 
To Jacobe Barrete, my son, and to him and his heirs forever, all my houses 
and lands after the decease of his mother, he paying to his brothers and 
sisters, or their heirs, as follows : to his brother George Barrell £6 13s. 4d. 
in two years after he enter into the said house and lands ; to his brother 
Traynor Barite £6 13s. 4d. in four years after entry; and to his sister 
Dorothy Barrile £6 13s. 4d. in six years after entry. If my son Jacobe 
refuse to pay said legacies, then son George to enter into the land and pay 
the said sums. The rest of my moveable goods unbequeathed to wife Helen, 
whom I make sole executrix. [Signed] Jacob Barrell. Witnesses : John 
Cullington, Thomas Cannon, and Jonas Blomfield. Item, I have given the 
surrender of all my houses and lands holden of the manor of Lciston into 
the hands of Jonas Blomfeild in the presence of Thomas Cannon to the 
use of my last will and testament. Proved at Snape 29 May 1621 by 
Helen, the relict and executrix named in the will. (Archdeaconry of Suf- 
folk (Ipswich), 1621, 29.) 

[George Barrell came to Boston in 1637 from St. Michael's, Wangford 
Hundred, Suffolk (Register, vol. 61, p. 69). By St. Michael's is meant the 
parish of South Elmham St. Michael's. There are six South Elmhams : 
South Elmham All Saints-cum-St. Nicholas, South Elmham St. Cross or 
Sandcroft St. George, South Elmham St. James, South Elmham St. Mar- 
garet, South Elmham St. Michael, and South Elmham St. Peter. An- 
ciently it was customary to call these places simply by the name of the 
church. The only other Barrell will found is of too early a date in the six- 
teenth century to trace any connection with this family. Savage calls the 
emigrant William Barrell a brother of George, but there is no evidence for 
this assertion, which appears to be erroneous, E. F.J 

[To be continued] 



76 Revolutionary Soldiers ofYorh County, Me. [Jan. 



REVOLUTIONARY SOLDIERS OF YORK COUNTY, 

MAINE I 

Communicated by George Walter Chamberlain, M.S., of Maiden, Mass. 

Forty-five years after the beginning of the American Revolu- 
tion there were 249 persons living in York County who appeared 
before Benjamin Greene of South Berwick, Chief Justice of the 
Court of Common Pleas for the first eastern circuit of Maine, to 
present their claims for pensions from the United States Govern- 
ment. The sessions of Court were held at York on July 4 and 5, 
1820, and at Alfred on July 18, 19, and 20 following. 

Each applicant for pension was required to make an affidavit of 
his services and present conditions for record in the Court and to be 
transmitted to the office of the Secretary of War. These affidavits 
in York County were arranged alphabetically and recorded in the 
Common Pleas Records, vol. 38, pp. 254-506, by Daniel Sewall, 
clerk. 

Somewhat over fifty of the applications were reversed at this ses- 
sion, and later many of these persons and about twenty others pre- 
sented their claims more fully than had been done in 1820. The 
later affidavits give much military information concerning the soldier 
as well as interesting facts about each family, and are recorded in 
several volumes of the court records (vide infra) . 

It must be remembered that, in 1820, Berwick included the pres- 
ent towns of Berwick and North Berwick ; Shapleigh, the present 
towns of Shapleigh and Acton ; Hollis, the present towns of Hollis 
and Dayton ; Saco, the present city of Saco and the town of Old 
Orchard ; while the town of Arundel has been changed to Kenne- 
bunkport. 

The families herein given include only those living with each ap- 
plicant at the date of his application. 

State of Maine 

York, ss. At a Circuit Court of Common Pleas, for the First Eastern 
Circuit, begun and held at York, within and for the County of York, on 
the first Tuesday of July, being the fourth day of said month, in the year 
of our Lord, 1820. 

Pursuant to a resolve of said State, for the purpose of receiving appli- 
cations of Pensioners for services in the revolutionary War. 

Present, the honorable Benjamin Greene, Chief Justice of said Court. 

Proclamation is made, and the Court is opened in the usual manner. 

Ordered, that each applicant cause his name to be entered on the docket, 
and that he pay to the Clerk three Dollars ; out of which he shall pay to 
the Court one Dollar & thirty Cents, to the Sheriff fifteen Cents, & to the 
Crier fifteen Cents ; and the residue being one Dollar & forty Cents, he 
retain to his own use, for the entry, administering the oath, filing the pa- 



1911] Revolutionwy Soldiers of York County, Me. 11 

pers, recording the proceedings at full length, copying & certifying the 
same under the seal of the Court, and transmitting the same to the office 
of the Secretary at War. 

The Court after sitting two days at York, adjourned to Alfred on the 
third Tuesday of July, being the eighteenth day of said month, at 10 
o'clock forenoon. 

York, ss. Alfred, July 18th, 1820. The Court is opened according to 
adjournment. 

Present, the honorable Benjamin Greene, chief Justice of said Court. 

After sitting three days at Alfred, the Court is adjourned without day. 

Attest, Daniel Sewall, Clerk. 

Act of Congress passed March 18, 1818, entitled, " An Act to provide 
for certain persons engaged in the land and naval service of the United 
States, in the Revolutionary War." 

Applications of Pensioners with Services in the Revolutionary 

War 

Affidavit of Daniel Abbot, aged 71 years, of South Berwick, July 4, 
1820. Private in Capt. Burbank's Co., Col. Brewer's Regt., Mass. line. 
Original declaration made May 9, 1818 ; Pension No. 8,379. Application 
reversed. Family : Betsey his wife, aged 39 ; Abigail, aged 4. (38 : 254) 

John Abbot, aged 65 years, of Berwick, July 4, 1820. Private in Capt. 
David Pilsbury's Co., Col. Wigglesworth's Regt., Mass. line. Original 
declaration made Mar. 13, 1818. Pension No. 7,688. Application re- 
versed. Family : Martha his wife, aged 62 ; Mary, aged 18 ; Almira 
his granddaughter, aged 12. (255) 

Jacob Allen, aged 62 years, of Berwick, July 18, 1820. Private in 
Capt. Frederick Hill's Co., Col. Enoch Poor's Regt., Newhampshire line. 
Original declaration made May 20, 1818. Pension No. 14,418. Applica- 
tion reversed. " Wounded in left thigh in Revolutionary War." Family : 
Dorcas his wife, aged 62 ; Ruth his daughter, aged 29 ; Abigail his daugh- 
ter, aged 23 ; Thomas his son, aged 16 ; John, aged 13 ; Ephraim, aged 
18 ; Elijah, aged 26. (256) 

James Allen, aged 65 years, of Wells, July 4, 1820. Seaman in the 
Navy of the Revolutionary War. Original declaration made April 27, 
1818. Pension No. 8,556. Application reversed. Family: Sarah his 
wife, aged 63 ; Bridget his daughter, aged 40. (257) 

Joseph Allen, aged 65 years, of Lyman, July 18, 1820. Private in 
Capt. Copps's Co., Col. Long's Regt., Mass. line. Original declaration 
made Nov. 13, 1819. Pension granted [not numbered]. Application 
affirmed. Family : Hannah his wife, aged 58 ; Rebecca Allen his daugh- 
ter, aged 18. (258) 

Stephen Andrews, aged CjQ years, of Lyman, July 18, 1820. Soldier 
in Capt. S. Sawyer's Co., Col. Patterson's Regt., Mass. line. Original 
declaration made April 7, 1818. Pension No. 7,480. Application af- 
firmed. Family: Mary his wife, aged 65 ; Mary his daughter, aged 30. 
(259) 

Simeon Applebee, aged 60 years, of Berwick, July 19, 1820. Marine 
in the Navy of the Revolutionary War. Original declaration made April 
13,1818. Pension No. 11,389. Application affirmed. Family: Bridget 
his wife, aged 61 ; Bridget, aged 9 ; Simeon, aged 7 ; Hawley, aged 5 ; 
and Olive, aged 3 ; all grandchildren of Simeon Applebee. (260) 



78 Revolutionary Soldiers of York County, Me. [Jan. 

Peter Babb, aged 57 years, of Limington, July 19, 1820. Private in 
Capt. Williams's Co., Col. Vose's Regt., Mass. line. Original declaration 
made April 13, 1818. Pension No. 7,474. Application affirmed. 
" Wounded in left ankle in Revolutionary War." Family: Thankful 
his wife, aged 42; Anna, aged 16; Deborah, aged 14; Eliza, aged 
1 1 ; Eunice, aged 9 ; and Peter, aged 3, all children of Peter Babb. 
(261) 

John Baker, aged 76 years, of York, July 4, 1820. Private in Capt. 
Samuel Derby's Co., Col. Prescott's Regt., Mass. line. Original declara- 
tion made April 13, 1818. Pension No. 8,380. Application affirmed. 
Family: Mary Baker, 69. (262) 

Ebenezer Bean, a non compos person, by his guardian Chas. Bean, 
aged 82 years, of Limerick, July 18, 1820. Private in Capt. Lane's Co., 
Col. Varnum's Regt., Mass. line. Original declaration made April 27, 
1818. Pension No. 13,126. Application affirmed. No family. (263) 

Joseph Berry, 1 aged 54 years, of York, July 4, 1820. Private in 
Capt. Hastings' Co., Col. Michael Jackson's Regt., Mass. line. Original 
declaration made April 13, 1818. Pension No. 14,246. Application af- 
firmed. Family : Abigail Berry his wife, aged 54 ; Abigail Berry, aged 
17 ; Malinda Berry, aged 14; Mary Berry, aged 13. (264) 

John Bickford, aged ^61 years, of Parsonsfield, July 18, 1820. Pri- 
vate in Capt. David Place's Co., Col. James Reed's Regt., Newhampshire 
line. Original declaration made May 9, 1818; Pension No. 11,771. 
Application affirmed. Family: Elizabeth his wife, aged 61 ; John his 
grandson, aged 7. (265) 

Henry Black, aged 62 years, of Eliot, July 4, 1820. Private in 
Capt. Dean's Co., Col. Tupper's Regt. (10th Mass.), Mass. line. Original 
declaration made April 1, 1818. Pension No. 8,558. Application af- 
firmed. Family: Sally Black, aged 67. (266) 

Elijah Baston [sic'], aged 65 years, of Wells, July 4, 1820. Private 
in Capt. Samuel Sayer's Co., Col. Patterson's Regt., Mass. line. Original 
declaration made April 8, 1818. Pension No. not given. Application 
reversed. Family : Olive his daughter, aged 33 ; Shubael his son, aged 
28 ; Abner his son, aged 22 ; Susan his daughter, aged 18 ; Adasa his 
daughter, aged 15 ; Data his daughter, aged 11. (267) 

Jonathan Boston, aged 66 years, of Lyman, July 18, 1820. Private 
in Capt. Daniel Merrill's Co!, Col. Brewer's Regt., Mass. line. Original 
declaration made April 8, 1818. Pension No. 10,336. Application af- 
firmed. Family: Betsy Boston, aged 40. (268) 

William Boothby, 2 aged 63 years, of Limerick, July 19, 1820. Pri- 
vate in Capt. Hill's Co., Col. Joseph Vose's Regt., Mass. line. Original 
declaration made April 13, 1818. Pension No. 5,506. Application re- 
versed. Family: Elizabeth Boothby his wife, aged 61; children: 
Olive Boothby, aged 30 ; Lucy Boothby, aged 25 ; Sukey Boothby, 
aged 23. Two grandchildren, aged 10 each [names not given]. (269) 

James Boyce, aged 63 years, of Lebanon, July 18, 1820. Mariner in 
the Navy of the Revolutionary War. Original declaration made May — , 
1818. Pension No. 11,388. Application" affirmed. No family. (270) 

James Bracey, 3 aged 77 years, of York, July 4, 1820. Private in 
Capt. Lunt's Co., Col. Tupper's Regt., Mass. line. Original declaration 

1 Joseph Berry enlisted from York, and was living there in 1835. 
3 Will i;un Boothby enlisted from Scarborough, and d. at Limerick, Me., Sept. 2, 1828. 
His widow Elizabeth was living at Limerick in 1835. 



1911] Revolutionary Soldiers of Yorlc County, Me. 79 

made April 21, 1818. Pension No. 11,575. Application affirmed. No 
family. (271) 

Arthur Bragdon, aged 65 years, of Shapleigh, July 18, 1820. In 
Capt. Jonathan Nowell's Co., Col. Prescott's Regt., Mass. line. Original 
declaration made Apr. 15, 1818. Pension No. 8,557. Application re- 
versed. Family: Eleanor his wife, aged 54; Levi his son, aged 19; 
Arthur his son, aged 16; Hannah his daughter, aged 28; Eleanor his 
daughter, aged 18: Mary his daughter, aged 14. (272) 

Daniel Bragdon, aged 85 years, of York, July 4, 1820. Private in 
Capt. Turner's Co., Col. Tupper's Regt., Mass. line. Original declara- 
tion made Apr. 25, 1818. Pension No. 11,573. Application affirmed. 
No family. (273) 

Ezekiel Bragdon, aged 72 years, of Hollis, July 18, 1820. Private in 
Capt. Jabez Lane's Co., Col. Thomas Nixon's Regt., Mass. line. Orig- 
inal declaration made Apr. 13, 1818. Pension No. 5,485. Application 
affirmed. Family : Mary Bragdon his wife, aged 68 ; Betsy Bragdon, 
aged 34. (274) 

John Bragdon, 4 aged 66 years, of Wells, July 5, 1820. Private in 
Capt. Samuel Derby's Co., Col. Bailey's Regt., Mass. line, Original 
declaration made Apr. 9, 1819. Pension No. 358. Application affirmed. 
Family : Charity his wife, aged 60 ; children : Sally, aged 32 ; Polly, 
aged 22, and Enoch, aged 15. (275) 

Daniel Bridges, 5 aged 58 years, of York, July 4, 1820. Private in 
Capt. Nicholas Gilman's Co., Col. Alexander Scammell's Regt., New- 
hampshire line. Original declaration made May 8, 1818. Pension No. 
13,714. Application affirmed. "No family living with him." (276) 

Samuel Brooks, aged 71 years, of Eliot, July 4, 1820. Serjeant in 
Capt. Tobias Fernald's Co., Col. Phinney's Regt., Mass. line. Original 
declaration made Apr. 1, 1818. Pension No. 10,243. Application af- 
firmed. Family : John H. Brooks, aged 28 ; Wid°. Tempe Nelson, 
aged 25 ; George Nelson, aged 6 ; John Nelson, aged 2. (277) 

Thomas Brown, aged 65 years, of Kittery, July 4, 1820. Mariner on 
board Dean Frigate of 32 guns, commanded by Lieut, llopley Yeaton. 
Newhampshire line. Original declaration made Dec. 13, 1818. Pen- 
sion No. 13,922. Application affirmed. Family: Eunice his wife, 
aged 56. (278) 

Timothy Burdeen, aged 57 years, of York, July 5, 1820. In Capt. 
Oliver Peirce's Co., Col. Michael Jackson's Regt., Mass. line. Original 
declaration made Mar. 31, 1818. Pension No. 7,732. Application af- 
firmed. Family: Mary his wife, aged hi) ; Abigail her sister, aged 62 ; 
Hiram his son, aged 20 ; Samuel his son, aged 16. (279) 
Nathan Butland, aged 70 years, of Wells, July 4, 1820. Private in 
Capt. Samuel Sayer's Co., Col. Patterson's Regt., Mass. line. Original 
declaration made April 8, 1818. Pension No. 12,620. Application af- 
firmed. No family. (280) 
David Came, aged 62 years, of York, July 4, 1820. Private in Capt. 
Samuel Derby's Co., Col. James Prescott's Regt., Mass. line. Original 
declaration made April 8, 1818. Pension No. 8,559. Reversed. 

3 . James Bracey enlisted from York, and was living there in 1835. 

♦John Bragdon of Kennebunk enlisted from Berwick, and was living at Kennebunk 
in 183."). 

6 Daniel Bridges of York enlisted there, and was living temporarily atWolfborough, 
N. H., in 1835. 



80 Revolutionary Soldiers of York County, Me. [Jan. 

Family : Elizabeth Came his wife, aged 55 ; Sarah Came, daughter, aged 
28 ; Mary Came, daughter, aged 24 ; Eliz a . Came, daughter, aged 22. 
(2S1) 
John Carlisle, aged 64 years, of York, July 4, 1820. Private in Capt. 
Edward Grow's Co., Col. Jotham Moulton's Regt., Mass. line. Original 
declaration made April 13, 1818. Pension No. 10,248. Affirmed. 
Family: Abigail, wife, aged 43 ; Hannah Carlisle, aged 6. ' (282) 
Ebenezer Carll, aged 62 years, of Hollis, July 20, 1820. Private in 
Capt. Silas Burbank's Co., Col. Brewer's Regt., Mass. line. Original 
declaration made April 13, 1818. Pension No. 5,510. Affirmed. 
Family : Lydia Carll, aged 39 ; Susan McKenny, aged 13. (283) 
John Carter, aged 61 years, of Kittery, July 4, 1820. Private in Capt. 
Daniels's Co., Cols. Long's & Gilman's Regt., Newhampshire line. 
Original declaration made Nov. 29, 18 1-. No pension. Family: Mary 
Carter, aged 43 ; Mercy Carter, aged 24 ; Sally Carter, aged 17 ; Eliz- 
abeth Carter, aged 11. (284) 
William Campernell, aged 81 years, of Newfield, July 19, 1820. In 
Capt. Abraham Dodge's Co., Col. Moses Little's Regt., Mass. line. 
Original declaration made Nov. 10, 1818. No pension. Affirmed. No 
family. (285) 
Eleazer Clark, aged 62 years, of Berwick, July 4, 1820. Private in 
Capt. Place's Co., Col. Reed's Regt., Newhampshire line. Original de- 
claration made Apr. 4, 1818. Pension No. 8,393. Affirmed. Family : 
Sally, wife, aged 62 ; Sabra, daughter, aged 26 ; Gilman, grandson, aged 
9. (286) 
Ephraim Clark, aged 64 years, of Limington, July 18, 1820. Mariner 
in the squadron commanded by Commod r Paul Jones in the Continental 
• frigate Alliance commanded by Capt. Peter Landies. Original declara- 
tion made May 8, 1818. Pension No. 14,352. Reversed. Family: Lucy 
Clark, aged 57 ; Polly Clark, daughter, aged 27 ; Edward Clark, son, 
aged 25 ; Lucy Clark, daughter, aged 21 ; Asenath Clark, daughter, 
aged 16; Elliot Clark, son, aged 13. (287) 
Benjamin Clay, aged 67 years, of Limington, July 18, 1820. Private in 
Capt. Enoch Putnam's Co., Col. Hutchinson's Regt., Mass line. Origi- 
nal declaration made July 9, 1818. Pension No. 15,817. Reversed. 
Family: Jane, wife,, aged 67; Lydia Clay, aged 35; Polly Clay, aged 
29. (288) 
Noah Cluff, aged Q5 years, of Arundel, July 18, 1820. Private in Capt. 
Wm. Guttridge's Co., Col. Benedict Arnold's Regt., Mass. line. Origi- 
nal declaration made Apr. 9, 1818. Pension No. 13,206. Affirmed. 
" Received wound in scaling the walls of Quebec," where he was taken 
prisoner. Family: Mary, wife, aged 63; Naomi, daughter, aged 36; 
Polly, grandchild, aged i4. (289) 
Nathaniel Coffin, aged 81 years, of Shapleigh, July 18, 1820. Lieu- 
tenant in Capt. Hubbard's Co., Col. Peirce Long's Regt., Newhampshire 
line. Original declaration made May 11, 1818. Pension No. 17,208. 
Affirmed. Family: Mary, wife, aged 62. (290) 
Alexander Cooper, aged 74 years, of South Berwick, July 5, 1820. 
Private in Capt. Pilsbury's Co., Col. Wiggles worth's Regt., Mass. line. 
Original declaration made April 15, 1818. Pension No. 7,733. Af- 
firmed. Family: Patience, wife, aged 71. (291) 
Ebexezer Cousens, aged 50 years, of Lyman, July 18, 1820. Private 
in Capt. Bates's Co., Col. John Brooks's Regt., Mass. line. Original de- 



1911] Revolutionary Soldiers of York County, Me. 81 

claration made April 8, 1818. Pension No. 5,907. Reversed. Family: 
Sarah, wife, aged 56; Robert, son, aged 30; Hannah, daughter, aged 
23 ; Richard, son, aged 21 ; Miram, daughter, aged 15 ; Betsy, aged 11. 
(292) 

Bray Cox, aged 58 years, of Kittery, July 5, 1820. Seaman in frigate 
Dean, commanded by Samuel Nicholson, in the Navy of the United 
States. Original declaration made April 17, 1819. Pension No. 12,415. 
Affirmed. Family : Olive Cox, wife, aged 68. (293) 

John S. Cram, aged 66 years, of Sanford, July 4, 1820. Private or drum- 
mer in Capt. Samuel Saver's Co., Col. Patterson's Regt., Mass. line. 
Original declaration made Apr. 8, 1818. Pension No. 10,338. Affirmed. 
Fan dly : Jerusha, wife, aged 71 ; Sarah, daughter, aged 24. (294) 

Joseph Curtis, aged 74 years, of Kittery, July 5, 1820. In Capt. Parks's 
Co., Col. Turner's Regt., Mass line. Original declaration made Apr. 1, 
1818. Pension No. 8,560. Affirmed. Family: Mary, wife, aged 57; 
Miriam, daughter, aged 19. (295) 

Jotham Doxnell, aged 70 years, of York, July 5, 1820. Serjeant in 
Capt. James Donnell's Co., Col. Samuel Brewer's Regt., Mass. line. 
Original declaration made Aug. 9, 1819. Pension No. 15,839. Re- 
versed. Family: Abigail, wife, aged 65; Nancy Grant, aged 8. (296) 

Obadiah Donnell, aged 69 years, of York, July 5, 1820. Seaman in 
the ship Ranger commanded by Capt. Paul Jones. Newhampshire line. 
Original declaration made April 7, 1819. Pension No. 14,249. Re- 
versed. Family : Abigail, wife, aged 60. (297) 

John Dorman, 6 aged 75 years, of Arundel, July 18, 1820. Private in 
Capt. Daniel Merrill's Co., Col. Samuel Brewer's Regt., Mass. line. 
Original declaration made Apr. 8, 1818. Pension No. 5,930. Affirmed. 
Family : Hannah Dorman, aged 73 ; Hannah Fletcher, widowed daugh- 
ter, aged 31 : Joseph Fletcher, aged 12. (298) 

Moses Drown, aged 74 years, of Wells, July 4, 1820. Private in Capt. 
Wheelwright's Co., Col. Francis's Regt., Mass. line. Original declara- 
tion made Apr. 8, 1818. Pension No. 5,926. Affirmed. Family: June 
Drown, aged 54; William Drown, aged 19; Ruth Drown, aged 20; 
Mary Drown, aged 18. (299) 

Stephen Drown, 7 aged 61 years, of Arundel, July 4, 1820. Private in 
Capt. Danl. Wheelwright's Co., Col. Ebenezer Francis's Regt., Mass. line. 
Original declaration made Apr. 8, 1818. Pension No. 5,929. Affirmed. 
Finally: Eunice, daughter, aged 25 ; Stephen, grandson, aged 20 months. 
(300) 

William Eaton, 8 aged 64 years, of Wells, July 4, 1820. Serjeant in 
Capt. Danl. Wheelwright's Co., Col. B. Tupper's Regt., Mass. line. 
Original declaration made Apr. 8, 1818. Pension No. 5,924. Reversed, 
Family: Abigail, W if o, aged 60; Lydia, daughter, aged 33 ; Andrew, 
son, aged 22 ; Nancy, daughter, aged 18. (301) 

Jacob Eastman, aged 58 years, of Parsonsfield, July 18, 1820. Musician 
in Capt. Ebenezer Foye's Co., Cols. Cilly's & Dearborn's Regt., Newi 
hampshire line. Original declaration made Apr. 27, 1818. Pen, ion 
No. 10,291. Affirmed. Family: Molly Eastman, aged 54; Dorcas 
Eastman, aged 22; Taylor Eastman, aged 15; Roxanna Eastman, aged 

•John Dorman enlisted from Arundel, and d. at Kennehunkport July 20, 1828. 
Hi- widow Hannah was living there in 1835. 

7 Stephen Drown enlisted from Wells, and was living at Kennebunkport in 1835. 

"William Eaton enlisted from W r eli.s, and was living there in 1835. 



82 Revolutionary Soldiers of Yorh County, Me. [Jan. 

12 ; Mary Eastman, aged 5 ; Sophronia Eastman, aged 4. (302) 

Nathaniel Edwards, 9 aged 65 years, of Parsonsfield, July 18, 1820. 
Private in Capt. Nicholas Blasdell's Co., Col. Edward Wigglesworth's 
Regt., Mass. line. Original declaration made May 12, 1818. Pension 
No. 10,555. Affirmed. Family: Bathsheba, wife, aged 60; Nathaniel, 
son, aged 20; Bathsheba, daughter, aged 20 ; Mary, grandchild, aged 16 
months. (303) 

Stephen Edwards, aged 65 years, of Buxton, July 20, 1820, by his 
guardian, Benj. Leavitt. Serjeant in the Revolutionary War. Original 
declaration made Apr. 13, 1818. Pension No. 5,710. Affirmed. No 
family. (304) 

Daniel Eldridge, 10 aged 59 years, of Buxton, July 19, 1820. Private 
in Capt. Pilsbury's Co., Col. Wigglesworth's Regt., Mass. line. Original 
declaration made Apr. 13, 1818. Pension No. 5,499. Affirmed. Family: 
Phebe, wife, aged 54; Sally Eldridge, aged 34; Eben r Eldridge, aged 
18 ; John Eldridge, aged 13. (305) 

Daniel Emery, aged 62 years, of Limerick, July 18, 1820. Private in 
Capt. Eliphalet Dunnels's Co., Col. Long's Regt., Newhampshire line. 
Original declaration made Apr. 8, 1818. Pension No. 13,128. Affirmed. 
Family: Elizabeth Emery, wife, aged 61. (306) 

John Fairfield, 11 aged 62 years, of Arundel, July 18, 1820. Private in 
Capt. Ezra Towne's Co., Col. Reed's Regt., Mass. line. Original de- 
claration made Apr. 8, 1818. Pension No. 669. Affirmed. Family: 
Hannah Fairfield, aged 56 ; John Fairfield, Jr., aged 15; Mary Fair- 
field, aged 11. (307) 

George Fall, 12 aged 66 years, of Lebanon, July 18, 1820. Serjeant in 
Capt. James Carr's Co., Col. George Reed's Regt., Newhampshire line. 
Original declaration made Apr. 14, 1818. Pension No. 11,572. Re- 
versed. Family : Fanny, wife, aged 47 ; Abra, daughter, aged 24 ; 
Isaac, son, aged 14 ; Jacob, son, aged 12. (308) 

Jonathan Farnham, aged 65 years, of York, July 4, 1820. Private in 
Capt. Samuel Derby's Co., Col. William Prescott's Regt., Mass. line. 
Original declaration made Apr. 20, 1818. Pension No. 5,333. Affirmed. 
No family. (309) 
Dennis Fernald, aged 62 years, of Eliot, July 4, 1820. Private in 
Capt. Tobias Fernald's Co., Col. Edmund Phinney's Regt., Mass. line. 
Original declaration made Apr. 1, 1818. Pension No. 10,250. Re- 
versed. Family : Betsy, wife, aged 59 ; Margery, daughter, aged 27 ; 
Hiram, son, aged 19 ; Miriam, daughter, aged 16; Samuel, son, aged 
11. (310) 

Tobias Fernald, aged 63 years, of Kittery, July 4, 1820. Private in 
Capt. Silas Burbank's Co., Col. Brewer's Regt., Mass. line. Original 
declaration made Apr. 13, 1818. Pension No. 8,502. Affirmed. No 
family. (311) 

9 

* Nathaniel Edwards enlisted from Wells, and was living at Parsonsfield in 1835. 

10 Daniel Eldridge enlisted from Gorham, and d. at Buxton, June 10, 1832. His 
widow Phebe was living at Turner in 1835. 

11 John Fairfield enlisted from Arundel, and d. at Kennebunkport June 10,1834. 
His widow Hannah was living there in 1835. 

12 George Fall d. at Lebanon Dec. 6, 1835. He was the son of Phillip Fall, who was 
burned to death in his house in Lebanon Dec. 8, 1782 (Hasey's Diary for 1782). 

[To be continued] 



1911] Proceedings of the JST. E. Hist. Gen. Society 83 



PROCEEDINGS OF THE NEW ENGLAND HISTORIC 

GENEALOGICAL SOCIETY 

By John Albree, Recording Secretary 

Boston, Massachusetts, 4 May, 1910. A stated meeting of the Society was 
held at Pilgrim Hall, 14 Beacon Street, at 2.30 p.m., President Baxter presiding. 

The minutes of the April meeting were read and approved. 

The reports of the Corresponding Secretary, Librarian, Historian, and Coun- 
cil were accepted. 

Fifteen members were elected by ballot to resident membership. 

Henry L. Chapman, D.D., LL.D., Professor of English Literature and Lan- 
guage. Bow doin College, and Vice-President of the Maine Historical Society, 
read a paper on Joel Barlow and his Golumbiad, in which he told of Barlow's 
interesting career as a patriot, man of affairs, diplomat, and man of letters, and 
commented on the fact that there still remains against Barlow the hostility born 
of political prejudices, the occasion of which has long since been forgotten. 

A vote of thanks of the Society was extended to Professor Chapman for his 
learned address, and for his careful and discriminating delineation of one who 
was a patriot and a poet. 

The meeting then dissolved, after which refreshments were served. 

5 October. A stated meeting of the Society was held at Pilgrim Hall, 14 
Beacon Street, Boston, at 2.30 p.m., President Baxter presiding. 

The minutes of the May meeting were read and approved. 

The reports of the Corresponding Secretary, Librarian, Historian, and Coun- 
cil w ere accepted. 

Twenty members were elected by ballot to resident membership. 

On motion, it w T as 

Voted — That the New T England Historic Genealogical Society accepts the be- 
quest of the late George Sumner Mann, subject to the conditions imposed in his 
will, and the Treasurer of this Society be hereby authorized to receipt for the 
said legacy, subject to the said restrictions. 

It was announced that the City Council of Boston had taken action relative 
to marking the scions of the Old Elm on the Common, as recommended by this 
Society. 

The paper of the afternoon was on Early American Jewish History, by Lee M. 
Friedman. LL.B., a member of the Suffolk Bar, in which he presented the results 
of his study of the history of a people that are frequently styled alien, but who, 
from the time of Columbus's first voyage, have been intenvoveu with the events 
of the American continent. He mentioned especially, among others, Solomon 
Franko. who was in Boston in 1649, the first recorded Jew in the present United 
States, Judah Moms, for forty years the instructor in Hebrew at Harvard Col- 
lege and Haym Salomon of Philadelphia, the ardent patriot and substantial sup- 
porter of Jefferson, Madison, and Munroe in tin; dark times of the Revolution. 

Rev. Anson Titus spoke of a visit to the grave of Monisat Northborough. Mass., 
and on his motion a vote of thanks of the Society was extended to Mr. Friedman 
for his paper, so interestingly presented, in which were embodied the results 
of extensh e and accurate research. 

Prank 1>. Sanborn of Concord spoke of Samuel Gordon's book on the Excel- 
lency of the .Jewish Character and the Christianization of Jerusalem, which was 
written in Boston at the time Franko was here. It was attributed for years to 

Milton, but Gordon'- authority i- now proven. 

The meeting was dissolved, after which refreshments were served and an 
exhibit of noteworthy genealogies was inspected. 

2 November. A stated meeting of the Society was held at 14 Beacon Street, 
at 2.30 p.m., President. Baxter presiding. 

The records of the October meeting were read and approved. The reports 
of the Corresponding Secretary, Librarian, EListorian, and Council were ac- 
cepted. 

By ballot the following we re elected members of the Nominating Committee : 
Joseph Gardner Bartlett, Virginia Mall. Arthur Greene Loring, Walter Kendall 
Watkins. and Frank Ernesl Woodward. 

VOL. LXV. 7 



84 Notes [Jan. 

Mr. George Francis Dow, Secretary of the Essex Institute, Salem, spoke on 
Ten English Towns, which he visited recently, and whose names are borne by 
towns in Essex County in Massachusetts. The address was replete with in- 
cident, description, historical fact, and anecdote. 

Archibald M. Howe and James H. Stark spoke of visits they had made in 
England, and on motion of Charles Sidney Ensign a vote of thanks of the 
Society was given to Mr. Dow for his account of his journey to the Old English 
Towns, for which his enthusiastic and thorough work on behalf of their New 
England namesakes especially prepared him. 

The meeting then dissolved, after which refreshments were served, and the 
collection of all the volumes of Massachusetts vital records thus far printed 
was inspected. s 



NOTES 

It having come to the attention of this Society that certain 
genealogists and publishers have used the name of the Society 
in connection with their own enterprises, the Society again de- 
sires to state that it has NO genealogical representatives in this 
country or in England, nor is it in any way connected with any 
publications other than those that it issues over its own name 
at 18 Somerset Street, Boston. 

The Committee on English Research desires to state, however, 
that although the Society has no official representative in England 
the Committee is employing Miss French as a record searcher there 
along special lines for the benefit of the Register. 

King, Browne.— In Phillimore and Gurney's Buckinghamshire Parish Regis- 
ters, vol. 6, pp. 10, 11, occur the following marriages at High Wycombe : 
Daniel King & Eliz. Guy 4 Oct. 1624 

Chaddus Browne & Eliz. Sharparowe 11 Sept 1626 

It was surmised by Mr. Henry F. Waters, who furnished the information to 
Mr. Rufus King for his u Pedigree of King of Lynn, Mass.," that Daniel King, 
Sr.,'s wife's family name was Guy. Her first name was known to be Elizabeth. 
The correctness of the surmise is borne out by the marriage mentioned above, 
to which Mr. Waters has called attention. High Wycombe is not far from Bea- 
consfielcl, in the same county, of which place Daniel King, Jr., was in May 1653, 
being bound for New England. (Cf . Register, vol. 33, pp. 375-6.) 

The date of Chaddus Browne's marriage, as above, and the first name of his 
wife, are right for Chad Browne of Rhode Island. The locality seems likely, 
judging by the names of his associates as shown by Sylvester Baldwin's nun- 
cupative will. (Ex inform. William P. Greenlaw; cf. Chad Browne Memorial, 
pp. 7-8, and Waters's 'Genealogical Gleanings, vol. 1, p. 708.) 

The Editor. 



Brown.— The following returns made by the Registrar General of Edin- 
burgh, 9 July 1880, are given in connection with the article "James Brown of 
Middletown, Conn.," begun on page 5 of this volume : 

City of Edinburgh, 1672, 1673, 1674 and 1675 : 
1672 John Brown Merchant & Helen Dalgleish a son named Alexander 
1672 Thomas Brown Stationer & Marion Calderwood a son named William 

1675 ■ a son named John 

1072 George Brown Merchant & Barbara Shaw a son named George 
1672 Sept. 15 James Brown Merchant & Isolett Chaucelor, a sou named James. 
Witnesses Archibald Barnes, Seth Weaver, John Brown Merchant, James 
Arbuckle Merchant, Robert Durie Merchant, & John Baillie Writlar 
1675 A son named William 

1672 John Brown Locksmith & Christian Thomson a son named Alexander 

1673 John Brown, Brewar, & Allison Forrest, a son named John 

1673 February 18 Thomas Brown Merchant, & Margaret Wallace, a son named 
James. Witnesses, .James Brown Merchant, James McCline Merchant, 
John Sympson, Alexander McAlexander, & John Wallace Cordiner. 



1911] 



JVbtes 85 



1673 John Brown Mason, & Jean Pinkertown, a son named John. 
1673 Robert Brown, Stationer & Margaret Dundas a son named William 
1675 John Brown "Writler & Janet Meoll a son George 
1675 Andrew Brown Cordiner & Margaret Little a son named Andrew 
1675 Edward Brown & Nicolo Samson a son named David 
1675 Thomas Brown & Eupham Waddel, a son Thomas 
1675 James Brown, Workman, & Agnes Fairbairn, a son John 
It .75 John Brown Merchant, & Bessie Burn a son George 
Parish of St. Cuthbert Edinburgh 

1673 No entry 

1674 Nov. 27 John Brown of Georgiemilne & Crawford, a daughter 

named Agnes. Witnesses : Sir John Nicholson, of that ilk, Sir Patrick 
Nislet of Dean, Captain James Brown, & David Pringle 

1675 No entry. Ed west A. Hill. 
Washington, D. C 



Leverett.— (Cf. Register, vol. 35, pp. 272-5, 345-56.) The theory that the 
address on the letter of King Charles to Gov. Leverett, which led to the assump- 
tion that Leverett may have been knighted, was due to a clerical error, is borne 
out by the following fact. 

The letter in question was granted on petition of John Wampus alias White, who 
was in prison in London for debt. In this petition Wampus prays for a letter to 
" Sir John Leverett." (Colonial Entry Book, vol. 93, p. 150 ; Papers, vol. 37, p. 
49.) Doubtless the scrivener who wrote the petition accepted it as a matter of 
course that so prominent a man had some title, and gave him that of Sir. The 
error was passed along by the clerks in the government, who then as now would 
not be apt to verify a title so common as that of Sir ; hence the address a S r John 
Leveritt, Knt." As to the reading of the date of receipt of the letter, Savage 
was probably correct in making it out 2 June 1677. From a court paper in 
Suffolk tiles (1642) it appears that Wampus brought over the letter himself, and 
arrived in the " spring of 1677," later more closely fixed by " four months 
since," the date of the entry being October. It is also an interesting fact that 
Robert Taft of Mount Hope was one of the men who became associated with 
Pratt and Blake in the attempt to establish their claim to lands under a grant 
from Wampus, which finally culminated in the incorporation of Sutton. It was 
at an Indian court held at Coowate at the lower falls of Charles River, in 1677, 
that Wampus's claims to possess land in severalty were repudiated by the Indians. 
This is one of the localities where the Christian Indians were allowed to settle 
at the end of the war, whilst hostilities were still being carried on, and was 
evidently an ancient village site, as during the past few years my son has quite 
thoroughly searched this locality and unearthed a number of stone implements, 
chips, and pottery, as have others in former years. The site of the village would 
seem to be in the little dell still partly existing in the ravine just north of Glen 
Road on the Wellesley side of the river at Newton Lower Falls, and between the 
Metropolitan Park reservation and Glen Road. The brook rising at Indian 
Spring, and that from the Hundreds, enter the river near this spot. 

Wellesley Farms, Mass. Eben Putnam. 



B F I NN EY, Randall, NOBMAN. — Pope's Maine and New Hampshire Pioneers, if 

published at the time, would have subjected the author to an action for libel, for 

he says that the unfortunate young woman, Margery Randall, was found guilty, 

because she was unable to prove her marriage to William Norman, whereas a 

. pages Further along the records show Norman's confession of having gricv- 

-lv w ronged her by marrying her without having been divorced from his wife 
in England ; whereupon Margery's marriage was annulled, with alimony, and he 
was banished the province Qnder pain Of death. Thomas Spinney was men- 
tioned in these proceedings, and this was doubtless the Margery thai became his 
Wife. It. Is commonly stated that Mary, wife of .John l-Yrnald. was daughter of 
Thomas Spinney, but I surmise that she was daughter of William and Margery 
Norman by this bigamous marriage. Norman was prosecuted for this double 

marriage 1 in March L660-1, and the History of Kittery says that, .John and Mary 
were married before 1GG0. Thomas Spinney does not mention Mary in his will, 



SQ Notes [Jan. 

although it was witnessed by a Mary Fernald ; but he had previously conveyed 
to John Fernald a piece of land by a peculiarly worded deed. Whether the origi- 
nal deed is in existence I know not, but I have closely examined the original record. 
Entries with comma and ampersand are common, as for instance, u Thomas Spin- 
ney, & Margery his wife," who are the grantors ; but there is no ampersand in de- 
fining Mary's parentage. The entry reads : " John Fernald, of the same town, 
shoemaker, who married Mary the daughter of the said Spinney, his said wife." 
This is the ancient possessive case and means Mary the daughter of said Spin- 
ney's said wife. Of course all the facts must have been well known in Kittery 
at the time this deed was drawn and recorded. Many worthy and some very 
prominent people come from John and Mary, and it looks as though we must 
acknowledge our descent from an ill-regulated and cruel, though apparently re- 
pentant, man and his unfortunate but blameless mate. On the other hand it 
should be said that later on in the deed the language is " their said daughter," 
and that after John Fernald's death Thomas Spinney stood as the grandfather 
of his minor children. The language of the deed, however, appears to be un- 
mistakable, as also that Mary was not Spinney, except as Thomas was a good 
father to her. Chaeles Thornton Libby. 

Portland, Me. 



Humfrey. — In a study of the life of John Humfrey, one of the founders of 
the Massachusetts Bay Colony, I have been led to the conclusion that he was 
the John Humfrey who signed the pedigree in Harleian MS. 1166, fo. 9 b , as pub- 
lished in the Visitation of Dorset, 1623, p. 57. He is recorded there as son and 
heir of u Michael Humfrey of Chaldon in com. Dorset," and aged 26 years in 
1623, with wife Elizabeth, daughter of u Herbert Pelham of Compton in com. 
Dorset," and John Humfrey, son and heir, aged one year. 

On page 105 of the History of the Ancient and Honorable Artillery Company is 
the statement that John Humfrey's eldest son John joined the company in 1641, 
which would make him about 19 or 20 at that time. 

But the best evidence of identity is a comparison of the pedigree signature 
with the signature of John Humfrey in his letter to his brother-in-law, Isaac 
Johnson, in 1630, as shown in 4 Mass. Historical Society Collections, vol. 6, 
pi. 1.* Though written seven years apart, and the signature attached to the 
pedigree a formal one, while the other was a careless one closing a familiar let- 
ter to his brother-in-law, I believe any expert in hand writing would pronounce 
them belonging to the same hand. 

It would be interesting to obtain, if possible, the will of Michael Humfrey. 
He is mentioned in the list of adventurers at Cape Ann by John White of Dor- 
chester in 1634, but among those ""all sithence deceased" (Register, vol. 61, 
p. 279). Further along in the list we find " John Humfrey, gent., living in New 
England." 

I think investigation will prove that Michael Humfrey of Windsor, Conn., was 
a grandson of the Michael of the Dorset pedigree and nephew of John Humfrey 
of the Massachusetts Bay Colony. 

* The arms in the seal following the signature appear to be the same as those accom- 
panying the Humfrey pedigree in the Visitation of Dorset, p. 57, viz. " Gules, a cross- 
croslet botonne argent, charged on each end with three escallops sable," and marked 
" Respited for proof of his right to this coate." — Editor. 




From Visitation of Dorset, 1623. 
From 4 Mass. Hist. Soc. Coll. vi. 



1911] 



Notes 87 



If tlie foregoing descent be correct, it is evident that the Lady Susan, sister 
of the Earl of Lincoln, was his second wife and not the mother of John the 
eldest son. It is also probable that he was a brother-in-law of Herbert Pelham, 
another of the founders of the Massachusetts Bay Colony. 

Geneva, III. H. B. Alexander. 



Manor or East Greenwich. — The expression in early charters and grants in 
New England, in substance, that the land was to be held in full and common 
socage as of the King's Manor of East Greenwich in the County of Kent, has 
troubled many people and has given rise to various explanations, many of them 
fanciful. The same expression was used in the grant by James I in 1608 to cer- 
tain Benchers of the Inner Temple and Middle Temple of the ground and build- 
ings occupied by them. What may be considered an authoritative explanation 
of the phrase is given by a Bencher of the Middle Temple, Arthur Robert 
Ingpen, K. C, in a note to page 25 of a recent edition of " Master Worsley's 
Book," a history of the Middle Temple, a copy of which follows : 

" The Manor of East Greenwich belonged formerly to the priory and convent 
of Shene, and was granted by the Prior to the King, 23 Hen. VIII, to be annexed 
to the patrimony of the Crown (Hasted's l Hist, of Kent,' 1778). Prior to abo- 
lition of Feudal tenure by 12 Car. II, c. 24, if the king granted lands without 
reserving any particular service or tenure the patentee would hold of him in capite 
by knights-service. The king was empowered by statute 35 Hen. VIII, c. 14, as 
to the lesser monasteries, and by. statute 37 Hen. VIII, c. 20, as to all manors 
and land not exceeding 40s. per ann. in value, and by whatever title acquired, to 
grant the same to be holden of the king, either by knights-service in capite, or 
by fealty in socage or burgage and not in capite. Subsequently by statute 1 
Edw. VI, c. 4, it was declared that all estates, without any limit as to value, 
holden of the king his heirs and successors by knights-service, socage or other- 
wise as of any of his or their Dukedoms, Earldoms, Baronies, Castles, or Manors 
which came to the Crown by means of any dissolution, surrender, attainder, con- 
viction, or outlawry should not be taken to be holden in capite or as tenure in ca- 
pite. Thenceforth Crown grants by Letters Patent, and even statutory grants of 
Crown lands (see 27 Eliz., c. 27), are frequently found to be in form t Tenendum 
de nobis et heredibus nostris in libera et commune sociag fldelibat tantum ut de 
manerio nostris de East Greenwich in Com. Kantise.' The tenendum ' as of our 
Manor of East Greenwich in free and common socage by fealty only ' was a fiction 
intended to create an estate within the meaning of the statute I Edw. VI, c. 4, 
and to express that the grantee held free of all services except fealty, which is 
an essential incident to every tenure and cannot be released. This was also for- 
merly a common form in the charters to the old English Colonies in America. 
An amusing speech was made by Sir James Marriott in addressing the House of 
Commons on the question of American taxation. He declared l that it appeared 
to him that the matter had been mistaken through the whole argument. It had 
been contended that America should not be taxed, because she was not repre- 
sented. But the assertion was untrue, seeing that when we took possession of 
America, we did so as part and parcel of the Manor of East Greenwich in the 
County of Kent' (Polsin's ' Law and Lawyers,' 1858, p. 177). The correspond- 
in ir stock manor of the Duchy of Lancaster was the Manor of Enfield in the 
County of Middlesex. The Manor of the Temple, although originally of the Honor 
of Leicester and Duchy of Lancaster, ceased to be connected with the Duchy on 
the vesting in the crown by 32 Hen. VIII, c. 24." James W. Hawks. 

New York, N. Y. 



I <;r.isn A.NCE8TBY or PRESIDENT Fillmobe. — The ancestry of President 
Millard Fillmore was investigated in 1857 by Dr. Ashbel Woodward of Frank- 
lin, Conn., who printed a genealogy of the family in the REGISTER in April of 
that year. Be deduced the President's descent from one John Fillmore, mari- 
ner, who married, in 1701. Abigail Tilton, and died at sea before 1711. The Eng- 
lish origin of this John Fillmore, mariner, has never been definitely ascertained. 
Dr. Wood ward stated that bis researches made It quite probable, If the evidence 
Is not quite conclusive, that John Fillmore, or more likely his ancestors (origi- 
nally from England), emigrated first to Nova Scotia, and that subsequently John 



88 JSTotes [Jan. 

settled in the colony of Massachusetts. Unfortunately Dr. Woodward did not say 
on what evidence this theory was based, but from the way in which he refers to 
the very eminent family of Filmer of Kent, now represented by Sir Robert Marcus 
Filmer, Bart., it would appear that he thought that the American Fillmores came 
from that stock ; but it is unlikely that this is anything more than a guess on the 
part of Dr. Woodward. That Filmer and Filmore, or Fillmore, are inter- 
changeable forms of the same name is well known. In a biographical notice of 
President Fillmore the Illustrated London News claimed a Devonshire origin for 
his family on probably no better evidence than Dr. Woodward possessed. Possi- 
bly this origin may have been suggested by or through Lewis Filmore, a jour- 
nalist engaged at one time on the London Times, whose ancestors held a respect- 
able position at Lympstone in Devonshire. What adds to this probability is that 
there is record of a John Filmore sailing from the adjoining port of Topsham 
in the early eighteenth century. He may be identical with the mariner John 
Fillmore, but there is nothing to show it, and so far the English origin remains 
unknown. 

We have two groups of the name. The Filmers, sometimes Filmore and es- 
pecially Finimore, settled in Kent in the 14th century, and the Filmores of Devon 
settled there at least as early as the 16th century. Hitherto I have been inclined 
to favor a Devonshire origin for the President's family, but an entry which I 
have just come across, whilst editing the second volume (soon to be issued) of 
my Kent Parish Register series, inclines me to think that after all the President 
may come from the Kentish family. The entry in question is : Comfort Filmer 
and Mary Crane, married by license at Willesborough, Kent, 5 July 1784. 

The significance of this entry lies in the fact that Nathaniel Fillmore, the 
President's grandfather, had an uncle named Comfort Fillmore, born 1742, died 
1814 ; the latter also having a son Comfort Day Fillmore, born in 1792. It will 
be seen that the American Comfort Fillmore was contemporary with but proba- 
bly somewhat senior to the English Comfort Filmer. The adoption of so un- 
usual a Christian name is surely more than a mere coincidence. 

Up to the present time I. have thought that this Christian name of the Presi- 
dent's great uncle belonged to that class of personal names derived from moral 
qualities, such as Faith, Hope, Charity, but the coincidence of the use of " Com- 
fort " as a Christian name by an English family of Filmer and an American Fill- 
more, almost contemporaneously, has led me to iuquire if it may not be due to 
a desire to perpetuate the memory of some family bearing the name of Comfort. 
Though it seems rare, I find that such a surname exists. It is first alluded to 
by Lower, who suggests that it is a contracted form of the place name Comer- 
ford, but it is not even mentioned by either Guppy or Bardsley. However, we 
find a few references to the name in the calendars to the wills in the Preroga- 
tive Court of Canterbury, which have been printed by the British Record Society. 
Thus we have : 

Ambrose Comforte, Battle, Sussex 1561 

Richard Comferett, Newport Pond, Essex 
and Bishop's Stortford, Hertfordshire 1588 

Elizabeth widow of Thomas Comfort of 
Keyston, Huntingdonshire 1626 

Thomas Comforte, juu., smith of Keidore 

Huntingdonshire 1627 

Richard Comfort alias Comport, yeoman, 

of Whitechapel, Middlesex 1628 

Thomas Comforte, yeoman, of Ashe Kent 1628 

It is evident that the Comforts belong to the southeast of England, and it is 
obviously possible that in the last named Thomas Comfort of Ashe we may have 
an ancestor of Comfort Filmer who married at Willesborough in 1784, and pos- 
sibly, too, of Comfort Fillmore who married in America in 1763. It must be 
borne in mind that in Kent there are two villages named Ashe, one in the west- 
ern part of that county a few miles from London, and the other in the north- 
eastern part near the Isle of Thanet, about twenty miles from Willesborough. 

Though obviously we have here nothing more than a possible clue to President 
Fillmore's English ancestry, these brief notes well illustrate the importance of 
having the leading English records in print. When more Kentish parish reg- 
isters have been transcribed and printed, and when the British Record Society 
continues the issue of its calendars of P. C. C. wills, it will be easier to trace 



1911] 



Notes 89 



out the Comforts and the Filmers, or Filmores, and in showing the connection 
of the two families we may yet light upon the English origin of President Mil- 
lard Fillmore. W. P. W. Philleuore. 
London, Eivj. 



Historical Intelligence 

History of Haverhill, X. H. — Mr. William Frederick Whitcher, A.M., Ph.D 
of Woodsville, N. H., is compiling a genealogical history of Haverhill, N. H. 



i 



Kelso. — Mr. Kelso, care Monahan Septic Co., Market and Madison 

Streets. Chicago, 111., has nearly completed a genealogy of the Kelso family, 
which he intends to publish soon. 



Wright. —Mrs. Gertrude J. Ketcham, 1673 Jackson Street, Denver, Colo., is 
about to publish the Genealogy of Samuel Wright of Lenox, Mass., including 
his English ancestry. 

Monnbt. — The Monnet Family Genealogy, by Mr. Orra E. Monnette, 1018 
Wright and Callender Building, Los Angeles, Cal., is in the hands of the printer, 
and the author hopes to have the volume ready for delivery early in 1911. 
For particulars address the author, as above." 



Banning. — Mr. Pierson W. Banning, care of Banning & Banning, Chicago, 
111., is at work on a genealogy of the Banning family, and is collecting materials 
relating to the following allied names : Allein, Alsop, Bateman, Button, Ham- 
mer, Harman, Hubbell, Kelsy, Lindsley, McCorkle, McKnight, Mitchell, Pierson, 
Post, and Wheelwright. 



Kent Register Series. — To those interested in the appearance of this series 
the announcement by Mr. W. P. W. Phillimore, in a letter to the Editor, that 
the volumes are being issued at a loss, will be received with regret. It is hoped 
that this statement will induce enough additional subscriptions to the series to 
cover the cost of production. 



Southampton Pilgrlm Memorial. — It is proposed to commemorate the ap- 
proaching tercentenary of the sailing of the Mayflower from Southampton by 
the erection of a memorial to the Pilgrim fathers near the site of embarkation 
in 1G20. A design for the monument has been prepared and the plans accepted. 
Towards the expense a sum of over £250 has been contributed. Donations may 
be sent to Mr. H. A. Cushing, Secretary of the New England Society, 43 Cedar 
Street, New York. 



Genealogies in Preparation. — Persons of the several names are advised to 
furnish the compilers of these genealogies with records of their own families 
and other information which they think may be useful. We would suggest that 
all facts of interest illustrating family history or character be communicated, 
especially service under theU. S. Government, the holding of other offices, grad- 
uation from college or professional schools, occupation, with places and dates 
of birth, marriage, residence, and death. All names should be given in full if 
possible. No initials should be used when the full name is known. 

Bodtoell. — Henry, who died at Lawrence, Mass., 1 June 1745, by Albert Edward 
Bodwell, 27 School Street, Boston, Mass. 

Bond. — Joseph, who died in North Carolina, about 1755-9, by Samuel B. Gar- 
rett, 304£ South Walnut Street, Muncie, Ind. 

CarUton. — Edward, who returned to England and died there, by Charles Field 
Haseltine, 1822 Chestnut Street. Philadelphia, Pa. 

Chadwick. — John, who died at Bradford, Mass., 5 Sept. 1707, by Charles Field 
Haseltine, 1822 Chestnut Street, Philadelphia, Pa. 



90 Booh Notices [Jan. 

Chevalier. -^Pierre, who died at Philadelphia, by Charles Field Haseltine, 1822 
Chestnut Street, Philadelphia, Pa. 

Crandall. — John, who died at Newport, E. I., about 1675-6, by Elwin Gerry 
Davis, Lock Box 258, Centerdale, K. I. 

Day.— John of Ipswich, Mass., by Charles Field Haseltine, 1822 Chestnut 
Street, Philadelphia, Pa. 

Gage. — John, who died at Rowley, Mass., 24 Mar. 1723, by Charles Field Hasel- 
tine, 1822 Chestnut Street, Philadelphia, Pa. 

Greenwood. — Thomas, who died at Newton, Mass., 3 Sept. 1693, by Frederick 
Greenwood, East Templeton, Mass. 

Haseltine. — Robert, who died at Bradford, Mass., 27 Aug. 1674, and John, who 
died at Haverhill, Mass., 23 Dec. 1690, by Charles Field Haseltine, 1822 Chestnut 
Street, Philadelphia, Pa. 

Lovering. — John, who died at Dover, N. H., 7 July 1668, and William, who 
died, probably in Maine, before 1691, by Mrs. Mary Lovering Holman, 10 Wales 
Street, Dorchester, Mass. 

Lum. — John, of Southampton, L. I., who died in 1651, by Edward H. Lum, 
Chatham, N. J. 

Newbold. — Michael, who died in Burlington Co., N. J., in 1692, by Elias Boudinot 
Stockton, 178 Valley Road, West Orange, N. J. 

Pearson. — John, who died at Rowley, Mass., 22 Dec. 1693, by John M. Pearson, 
713 Union Street, Schenectady, N. Y. 

Bugg. — John, who died at Lancaster, Mass. (will 9 Dec. 1696), by Mrs. Ellen 
R. Rugg, 84 Grove Street, Leominster, Mass. 

Woodman. — Edward, who died at Newbury, Mass., about 1693-4, by E. Frank 
Woodman, Jr., Carlinville, 111. 



BOOK NOTICES* 



[The editor requests persons sending books for notice to state, for the information 
of readers, the price of each book, with the amount to be added for postage when sent 
by mail. For the January issue, books should be received by Nov. 1 ; for April, by 
Feb. 1 ; for July, by May 1 ; and for October, by July l.J 

A history of the descendants of Gamaliel Beaman and Sarah Clark of Dorchester 
and Lancaster, Mass., by Emily Beaman Wooden, A. M. 1909. 8° pp. 209, 
illus. 

This book is the fruit of years of research to obtain names and dates and to 
trace lost lines ; it contains valuable data, including parentage and dates of birth 
and death of those who married into the Beaman family, and brings the de- 
scendants of Gamaliel down to 1909. It is provided with an index. The rev- 
olutionary records of all Massachusetts soldiers bearing this name are given. 
The book concludes with the account of the captivity of Mrs. Rowlandson of 
Lancaster, Mass., 1675. Gamaliel Beaman settled in Dorchester in 1659, went 
to Lancaster, was driven away by Indians, but returned in 1680. The " Beaman 
oak," which he planted on his home lot, is shown in the frontispiece. English 
records have been consulted to find the home of the family in England. 

Descendants of Nicholas Cady of Watcrtoion, Mass., 1645-1910, by Ohuin Peer 
Allen. Press of C. B. Fiske & Co., Palmer, Mass., 1910. 8° cloth, pp. 546, 
illus. Price $5 ; for sale by the author, 21 Church Street, Palmer, Mass. 

Mr. Allen's work began twenty years ago by personal research in the records 
of Massachusetts and eastern Connecticut, supplemented by correspondence 
with relatives. Nicholas Cady of Watertown took the oath of fidelity in 1652. 
His wife was Judith Knapp, daughter of William. They went to Groton about 
1668 , and their sons and grandsons removed to Connecticut. The book is arranged 

* All the unsigned reviews are written by Miss Helen Tilden Wild of Medford. 



1911] 



Booh Notices 91 



according to the plan adopted by the Register. All dates prior to 1742 con- 
form to the old style then in use. The descendants of the daughters of the 
Cady line are given as far as their grandchildren, and the place and date of birth 
of persons marrying into the Cady family are given, if possible, and often an 
outline of ancestry and personal history. Among the portraits is one of Eliz- 
abeth Cady Stanton. In the appendix is a list of soldiers of the Revolution 
bearing the Cady name. 

Colcord Genealogy. Descendants of Edward Colcord of New Hampshire, 1630 
to 1908. by Doaxe Blood Colcord, B.S., M.D., late Prof, of Chemistry, 
Kansas Medical College, Creswell, Ore. Published by Mahlon J. Colcord, 
Coudersport, Pa. 1908. Press of Potter County Journal, Coudersport, Pa. 
8° pp. 124-42, illus. 

This book, the author states, is to prove that the American Colcords are de- 
scendants of Samuel Colcord of Kingston, N. H., and his father Edward Colcord 
or Colcott who came to New England, 1630-1, from co. Hants, England. Only 
families bearing the Colcord name are included in the body of the book, but lists 
of descendants bearing other names are given in the appendix. There is a list 
of soldiers of the Revolution from whom descendants of Samuel Colcord may 
claim descent, and a Civil War army roll. The volume is provided with a chart 
showing lines of descent, and abounds with family portraits and short autobi- 
ographies. There are two indexes, one of the Colcord given names and another 
of names other than Colcord. 

William Coaldwell, Caldwell or Coldwell, of England, Massachusetts, Connecti- 
cut, and Nova Scotia. Historical sketch of the family and name and record of 
his descendants, by Charles T. Caldwell, M.D. Washington, D. C. 1910. 
Press of Judd and Detweiler, Inc., Washington, D. C. 8° pp. 82. 

The text of this book is an address delivered at the dedication of a monument 
in Wolfville, N. S., to William Coaldwell and Jane Jordan, his wife, who emi- 
grated to Acadia after the English took possession. The story of these adven- 
turous pioneers is well told and very interesting. The name Cauldwell was ap- 
plied to the family in Scotland, Cold well in England, and Colwell in Ireland. In 
this country and Nova Scotia the name has been also written Caldwell. The 
The author has compiled the genealogical matter with great care, insisting upon 
dates, places and names in full, and incorporating many biographical notes. 
He has made no attempt to include descendants not bearing the family name, 
and states that he has been unable to locate some branches. He begs those who 
can give additional information to make themselves known to him. The book 
is provided with a good index. 

Copeland Gleanings, 1651-1005, compiled by Leland Stanford Coreland, 
Middletown Springs, Vermont. The Tourist Print, Southern Pines, 1910. 16° 
pp. 14. 

A branch of the Copeland family which removed to Middleton, Vt., and thence 
to Russell, Kan., is recorded in this little publication. The line is as follows. 
Lawrence, Benjamin (of Braintree, Mass.), Moses of Mansfield, Mass., Moses 
of Middleton, Edwin of Middleton Springs, Vt., and Charles Paul of Russell, 
Kan. In addition to sketches of the lives of these men, short notices are given 
of the families of their wives. The compiler is the son of Charles Paul Cope- 
land. 

Reunions of the Durell family , arranged byHAROLD Clarke Durkll. A.B., from 
the books of the secretary, Walter G. Durell, of Strong, Maine. Cambridge, 
Mass., 1910. 8° pp. 1';. 
This gives the names of those present at the reunions, date and place of 

meeting, etc., together with names of otticcrs elected. 

Outline sketches of the descendants of Nathaniel Dwell of KingfwhK Maine, 
compiled by Harold Clarke Durell, A.P>. Cambridge, Mass., 1910. 24» 
imp. 

Benjamin Durell was a soldier in the Revolution. Bis son Nathaniel was the 
founder of the Kingfield. Maine, branch of the family. The compiler does not 
claim that he is publishing a complete family record, but his little pamphlet 



92 Booh Notices [Jan. 

contains what lie has been able to gather during his visits to Kingfield the past 
three years. Dates are given by years only. 

Some account of Capt. John Frazier and his descendants, with notes on the West 
and Checkley families, by Josiah Granville Leach, LL.B. Printed for pri- 
vate circulation by J. B. Lippincott Co., Philadelphia, 1910. 8° pp. 6+139, 
illus. 

Only 135 copies of this fine example of the book-maker's art have been printed. 
The reproductions of family portraits and old manuscripts delight the eye, 
while the subject matter demands a careful reading. Capt. John Frazier came 
from Scotland, and sailed from the port of Boston for twenty years previous to 
1775. His sons were merchants of Philadelphia. His descendants are followed 
through male and female lines, and the index reveals at a glance the prominent 
families with whom they are connected. The West genealogy gives the ances- 
try of Anne West, wife of Nalboro Frazier; the Checkley record the ancestry 
of Sarah Ingraham, wife of Capt. John ; and the Zimmerman diary the ancestry 
of Isabella, wife of Benjamin West Frazier. A chart is inserted giving the 
ancestry of Mrs. William West Frazier, born Harriet Morgan Harrison. 

Genealogy of some descendants of Dr. Samuel Fuller of the Mayflower, compiled 
by William Hyslop Fuller, of Palmer, Mass., to which is added A supple- 
ment to the genealogy of some descendants of Edward Fuller of the Mayflower, 
published in 1908. Printed by C. B. Fiske & Co., Palmer, Mass., 1910. 8° 
pp. 263, illus. Price $5, postpaid. For sale by William H. Fuller, 23 School 
Street, Palmer, Mass. 

While searching for material for the first volume of a Fuller genealogy, the 
author brought to light much data in regard to the Samuel Fuller family, which 
formed the basis of this new volume. Beyond the names and dates of birth of 
children of Fuller daughters, details of the female lines have been omitted. 
After the third generation the sons who had families form heads of fourteen 
groups, arranged in order of seniority of the fathers. The supplement gives 
new information concerning the descendants of Edward Fuller. Both the main 
volume and supplement are indexed, and Mr. Fuller's painstaking work is 
another valuable addition to the family history of the Pilgrims. The illustra- 
tions are excellent, two of the most interesting being the interior and exterior 
views of the church where Dr. Fuller was baptized. 

Matthew Gallaway and his descendants, compiled by Irene Dabney Gallaway, 
1908. 8° imp. Southern Press, Waxahachie, Texas. Price 50 cts. Address 
Author, Waxahachie, Texas. 

" Every family is a history in itself and even a poem to those who know how 
to search its pages " is one of the quotations scattered through this pamphlet, 
and Miss Gallaway has felt its truth so strongly that she has put her own per- 
sonality as well as that of her kinsfolk into their records. Matthew Gallaway 
appeared in Oglethorpe Co., Ga., about 1800. His family went to Alabama, and 
their descendants pushed on to Mississippi, Texas, and even to California. The 
presswork of the book is good, and the plan followed in the genealogical work 
is clear. 

Extracts from British Archives on the families of Halley, Hawley, Parry, Pyke, 
etc. {Third Series), by Eugene F. McPike. Reprinted from the Magazine of 
History, N. Y., 1910. 8° pp. 28. 

The collateral ancestry of Stephen Harris, born Sept. 4, 1798, and Marianne 
Smith, born Apr. 2, 1805, by Joseph S. Harris. George F. Lasker, printer, 
Philadelphia, 1908. 4° pp. 190. 

This book, giving the collateral ancestry of the grandparents of the author, 
represents, with the Harris and Smith records printed in 1903 and 1906, re- 
spectively, thirty-five years of work, and completes the sketches which the 
author prepared concerning his ancestry. The records given bring the families 
down to the point where they join the Harris or Smith line. There is no index 
of names, but two charts to some extent make up the deficiency. The ancestry 
is traced back to the old countries— Scotland, Ireland, and Wales predominating. 
All the American branches originated in Pennsylvania. The names treated in 



1911] 



Booh Notices 93 



this work are Campbell, Bailey, Hubbard, Frazer, Vaughan, Taylor, Parry, 
Robert Smith Worrall, Worrilow, Goodwin, Roman, and Maris. 

Descendants of Abraham Huntting, the sixth in line from John Huntting, the first 
of the name in America, compiled by Tennis D. Huntting, Brooklyn, N. Y. 
Printed for private distribution, 1910. 8° pp. 9, illus. 

John Huntting, born in England in 1597, married Hester Leaborne, a relative 
of John Rogers the martyr, 1617, came to Dedham in 1638, and was the first 
ruling elder of the church in that town. The brochure gives the family records 
of his descendants who were ancestors of Abraham (1773-1851), and the de- 
scendants of the latter, in male and female lines, to the present time. Although 
some of the descendants of John Huntting may have dropped one of the two t's 
in the name, this branch retains the spelling which appears in the signature of 
John of Dedham. 

Lewis, with collateral lines, Andrews, Belden, Branson, Butler, Gillett, Newell, 
Peck, Stanley, Wright, and others. Ancestral record of Henry Marty n Lewis, 
by Harriet Southworth (Lewis) Barnes. Philadelphia, 1910. 8° pp. 73, 
port. Price $2.00. Address Mrs. A. M. Barnes, Melrose Park, Pa. 

This little book is in the nature of a memorial to the father of the author, 
and traces his ancestry through old Connecticut families, most of whom emi- 
grated from Massachusetts with Hooker, to their progenitors in Wales and 
England. Historical notes in regard to nearly all direct ancestors are given. 
The book is a companion to the Southworth and Humphreville sketches, pub- 
lished in 1909 by the same author. 

Descendants of Joseph Loomis in America, and his antecedents in the old world. 
The original published by Elias Loomis, LL.D. ; revised by Elisha Scott 
Loomis, Ph.D., 1908 [1909].- 4° pp. 839, illus. 

This scholarly production, bound in morocco and finely illustrated, suggests 
a family bible in size. It would be a convenience to patrons of genealogical 
libraries if the index, which occupies two hundred odd pages, referred to pages 
and not to numbers designating persons, which run from 1 to 12,670 through 
eleven generations. Sections in the index give soldiers of the Civil War, college 
graduates, and celebrated people bearing the name. Sixty-two pages are de- 
voted to the history of the family in England. Joseph Loomis (Braintree and 
London, Eng.) came to Dorchester, Mass., in 1638, and the next year went to 
Windsor, Conn. It is remarkable that the title to his homestead has never 
passed out of the Loomis name. The estate is now occupied by a school which 
was founded primarily for the benefit of the descendants of Joseph Loomis. 

The Martin family. Descendants of Thomas Martin of Goochland Co., Va., by 
Irene Dabney Gallaway. 8° unp. Sentinel Press, Fayetteville, Ark., 1906. 
50 cts. Address Author, Waxahachie, Texas. 

The descendants of Thomas Martin, through his sons, William, Dabney A., 
and Hutson, are recorded. The scarcity of dates and number of diminutive 
names show that information concerning the later generations was obtained by 
correspondence with relatives rather than from official records. The families 
being so widely separated, we appreciate the difficulties under which the author 
labored. Thomas Martin was a soldier of the American Revolution, and his 
descendants fought, some for the Confederacy and some for the Union, during 
the Civil War. 

Genealogy of the McFarland family of Hancock Co., Maine, by Daniel Y. Mc- 
Fakland, 1910. Press of Seymour Brothers, Middlebury, Vt. 8° pp. 58. 
Price $1, postpaid. Address the author, North Lamoine, Maine. 

The author of this pamphlet, which is dedicated to his children's children, 
came out of the Civil War with the right arm gone and the left hand maimed; 
but thifi has not prevented him from the exercise; of his talents for the benefit 
of his community. He is an authority on the history of Hancock Co., and his work 
is concise and shows careful study of records. His ancestors, James and 
Thomas McFarland, went to Maine before 1708, and both served in the Revo- 
lutionary war. They married sisters. Margaret and Jane Smith of Londonderry, 
N. H. Only children and grandchildren of James are mentioned, except the 



94 Booh Notices [Ja u | 

family of a daughter who married a sou of Thomas. The descendants * 
Thomas are traced to the sixth generation. 

The historical journal of the More family, founded 1892. No. 15. Seattle, Wash 
ington, April, 1910. Issued by the John More Association. All communica 
tions to be sent to Charles Church More, Secretary, Box 93, University Sta- 
tion, Seattle, Wash. 8° pp. 241-2G0 inclusive. 

This number contains notices of wedding anniversaries, marriages, and deaths ! 
of members of the association, and forms the eleventh supplement to the More 
genealogy. 

Tlie historical journal of the More family . No. 16. Seattle, Wash. August 1910 
8° pp. 2G1-304 inclusive, illus. 

This number contains the genealogy of Maria Laraway Stanley, whose daugh 
ter married Edward Livingston More ; a tribute to the late David Fellows More 
founder of the u Journal"; memoirs of deceased members of the association 
notices of marriages ; and the twelfth supplement to the More genealogy, besid 
other items interesting to the family connection. 

Autobiography of Thomas Painter, relating his experiences during the war of the 
Revolution. Printed for private circulation, March, 1910. 8° pp. 10G, illus. 

Mrs. Lewis Clephane, of Washington, D. C, thinking that those of Thomas 
Painter's descendants to whom the original manuscript was not accessible would 
prize copies of it, has had it printed for private distribution among them , and has 
also supplied a limited number of historical societies with the book. The ad- 
ventures of Capt. Painter on sea and land during the Revolution, his confinement 
in the Jersey prison ships, and his subsequent life as a ship master and owner, 
told in his quaint phraseology, are interesting to any reader. He begins his tale 
with a reference to his ancestry, and the second chapter relates entirely to his 
own family. A chart is appended giving his descent for six generations. 

Daniel Perrin, " the Huguenot" and his descendants in America, of the surnames 
Perrine, Perine and Prine, 1665-1910, compiled by Howland Delano Per- 
rine, A.B., LL.B., of the New York Bar. 4° pp. 6+547, illus., privately 
printed, South Orange, N. J., 1910. Price $15, postage 35c. Address the 
author, South Orange, N. J. 

We regret that this handsome volume was received too late for notice in our 
October number. Daniel Perrin, the emigre, was probably from the island of 
Jersey, where the name appears as early as 1440. His wife was of French ori- 
gin. They were enrolled as " servants " of Governor Carteret, and allotted land 
on Staten Island. The genealogy traced from this couple, together with a study 
of the name in foreign records, represents years of faithful research. Where 
possible, the generations are brought down to the present. The book is finely 
illustrated — the frontispiece being a photogravure of Howard Pyle's painting, 
" The landing of Governor Philip Carteret," signed by the artist. 

A record of the line of descent from Robert Quinby of Amesbury, 3Iass., to Ben- 
jamin Quinby of Unity, N. H., and a complete record of Benjamin's descend- 
ants, by Rev. Silas E. Quinby. Bristol, N. H., press of R. W. Musgrove, 
1910. 8° pp. 29. 

Robert Quinby, the immigrant ancestor, received an allotment of land at l< Lion's 
Mouth," Amesbury, and was killed by Indians, 1677. His great-grandsons, Jon- 
athan and Benjamin, removed to Hopkinton, N. H. The descendants of Benja- 
min, son of Jonathan, are traced through male and female lines to the present 
time. The addenda give genealogical notes in regard to Isaac, another son of 
Jonathan. The descendants of Benjamin of Unity adopted the name of Quim- 
by. The book contains biographical notes and quotations from old records. 

Scoville Family Records. A preliminary brochure, compiled by Charles Ro- 
CBESTBB EASTMAN, Cambridge, Mass., 1910. 8° pp. 23, illus. Privately printed 
at Waverly Press. Copies gratis to members of Scoville family. 

The compiler presents an initial, not a final attempt to collect the history and 
vital records of the Scoville family in Connecticut. If this publication suc- 
ceeds in preparing the way for a comprehensive genealogy of the family, his 



1911] 



Booh Notices 95 



object will be attained. The original emigrants were Arthur of Boston, Mass., 
1652, and John of Farmington, Conn., 1GG6. About 1680 John went to TVater- 
bury, and later to Haddam. Arthur removed to Middleton and Lyme, Conn. 
The Waterbury and Middleton branches of Scovilles remained in Connecticut 
for three or four generations, when many removed to New York and Ohio. The 
East Haddam family moved northward and eastward, even as far as Acadia, and 
to the west into Litchfield Co., Conn. 

Smith, icith collateral lines, Chipman, Divine, Huckins, Jones, Lewis {Barnstable 
branch) and Mayflower connection. Ancestral record of Fi'ances Amelia (Smith) 
Lewis, by Harriet Southwobth (Lewis) Barnes. 8° pp. 51. Philadelphia, 
1910. 

In this pamphlet we find the descent from the immigrants James Smith of 
Weymouth, Mass., Elder John Chipman of Plymouth and Barnstable, Mass., 
John Divine of Lynn, Thomas Huckins of Barnstable, Benjamin Jones and son 
Joseph, of Oxford, Conn., George Lewis or Lewes, one of the " men of Kent " 
at Scituate, Mass., John Howland and Edward Tilley, of Mayflower fame, 
through a succession of Connecticut pioneers to Frances A. (Smith) Lewis, 
mother of the author. The names of children of each generation are given, but 
dates and historical notes are generally omitted, unless they refer to ancestors 
or the immediate family of Mrs. Lewis. 

The Starkeys of New England and allied families, compiled for Albert Crane, 
IJsq., by Emily Wilder Leavitt. Press of Springfield Printing and Binding 
Co. 1U10. 8° pp. 135, illus. 

This book, admirable in every particular, is dedicated to the memory of Cla- 
rissa Lawrence Starkey, wife of Thomas Crane of Quincy, Mass., New York 
City, and Stamford, Conn. She was born in Troy, N. H., 183G, daughter of 
George and Betsey (Lawrence) Starkey. Her ancestry is traced back to the 
mother country, and quotations from English records are plentiful. Her pio- 
neer ancestors in this country were John Starkey and John Waite of Maiden, 
John Lawrence of Groton, Alexander Balcom of Providence, R. I., Rear Admi- 
ral Thomas Greaves of Charlestown, Mass., Banlield Capron of Barrington and 
Attleborough, Mass., and Pentecost Blackington of Marblehead. Miss Leav- 
itt's system is similar to that used in the Register, and each family record is 
preceded by a table showing the connection with the Starkey line. The bind- 
ing, press work, and paper are of the best, and a comprehensive index is added. 

Sutherland JRecords, by DOUGLAS MERRITT, Rhinebeck, N. Y., n. d. 8° pp. 22. 

Various families of the name are noticed as follows : William of New Win- 
sor. N. V., birthplace unknown, died 1724; William of Dutchess Co., parent- 
age in doubt, married Hannah Avery, 1720; William of Chatham, X. Y., from 
Scotland, born 1741; Sutherlands of Yates and Westchester counties, N. Y., 
and Washington Co., Pa.; Smith Sutherland of Greenville, N. Y., died 1818; 
Sutherlands of Batavia, N. Y., and Joseph of Horseneck, Conn. — a series of 
notes taken from records in the localities mentioned, with no effort to trace 
family connections. 

The JJrann Family of New England, including the descendants of Margaret 
(Uranri) Gamradl, by Charles Collyer Whittibb of Boston, Mass. Bos- 
ton. Press Of David Clapp & Son, 1910. 8° pp. 60. Price 75c. Address the 
author, 374 Blue Hill Avenue, Roxbury, Ma 

Reprinted, with additions, from the New England Historical and Gen< alogical 
Reg ter for January and April, L910. Anj Information concerning the families 

mentioned will be duly appreciated by the compiler. 

Genealogy and Descendants of Rev. David Ward, through Andrew Ward^ com- 
piled and arranged by Mrs. Frances B. Hamlin, wife of Rev. Tennis S. 
Hamlin, D.D. Chart. George E. Howard, printer and engraver, Washing- 
ton, I). C n. d. 

The genealogy of Rev. David Ward Is traced to Osbert De Varde (1180) of 
Givendale, York-hire. England. Brief notices are given in the margin of Os- 
bcii De Varde, Andrew and Asael Ward, the Andrew Ward Association, and 
authorities consulted in making the chart. Descendants of Rev David Ward 



96 Booh Notices [Jan. 

are eligible to membership in Sons and Daughters of the American Revolution, 
Society of Colonial Dames, Daughters of 1812, and the Andrew Ward Associa- 
tion. Mrs. Hamlin is to be congratulated upon the clear and concise arrange- 
ment of the chart, and the printer for his artistic workmanship. 

Andrew Warde and his descendants, 1597-1910, being a compilation of the facts 
relating to one of the oldest New England families, and embracing many fami- 
lies of other names descended from the worthy ancestor even unto the tenth and 
eleven th generations, compiled under the direction of the Association of De- 
scendants of Andrew Ward by George Kemp Ward, A.M., Secretary. A. T. 
de la More, Printing and Publishing Co., Ltd., N. Y., 1910. 4° pp. 603, illus. 
This large volume^contains the names of some fifteen thousand descendants 
of Andrew Warde. The biographical portion of the book contains in narrative 
form the history of several prominent families in the Ward connection, and there 
is a chapter upon the Andrew Ward Association. Andrew Ward is first recorded 
in Watertown, Mass., whence removed to Wethersfield, Conn., 1637, and later 
was a founder of Stamford and Fairfield, Conn. Among his descendants are 
the noted family of Lyman Beecher, Gen. Andrew Ward of Revolutionary fame, 
Gen. Joseph Wheeler, and many others who have left their impress upon the 
history of the United States. The index gives Ward descendants, male and fe- 
male; males and females, other than Ward; persons, male and female, allied by 
marriage. A single number system, with no reference to previous generations, 
makes this elaborate index an absolute necessity. 

Watson Genealogy, 1760-1909, by Martha Ziegler Watson, 1909. 8° pp. 

102, illus. Press of Mountain Echo, Keyser, W. Va. Author's address, 116 

Alice Street, Keyser, W. Va. 

Joseph Watson was born in Lancaster, Pa., about 1760, of Scotch ancestry. 
He settled in Cumberland Co., Pa., and married wives of Pennsylvania Dutch 
stock. Miss Watson devotes one chapter to him and one each to his sons and 
daughters, thirteen in all, whose descendants are scattered through the middle 
anclf ar West. The author has been fortunate to obtain much information from 
the children of Joseph Watson, only one of whom was living in 1909. In tracing 
the younger generations, if unable to obtain vital records, she gives the last 
known address of the person or family under consideration. Blank pages are 
left for additional information. 

Williams Genealogy, Vi ethers field, Cromwell branch, compiled by Murray Ed- 
ward Poole. Press of the Ithaca Journal, 1910. 8° pp. 43. 

The first six pages of this pamphlet are devoted to the story of a family of 
farmer's boys in Upper Middleton (Cromwell) , Conn., who left home to seek their 
fortunes in northern New York in the early forties, and became successful in 
mercantile, political, philanthropic, aud literary pursuits. Josiah, the second 
son, cast the deciding vote which gave Central Park to New York, and was one 
of the original board of trustees of Cornell University. The emigrant ancestoj 
of the family, Thomas Williams, came from Wales to Wethersfield, Conn. The 
scheme of members designating dhTerent generations and branches is decided!; 
original ; but the value of the work would be greatly increased if there Avert 
an index. 

The Woods family of Groton, Massachusetts, a record of six generations, by Hen- 
ry Ernest Woods, A.M. Privately reprinted from vol. 64, New England 
Historical and Genealogical Register, 1910. Press of David Clapp & Son, 
Boston. 8° pp. 39. 

Proceedings of the Bar and Officers of the Supreme Court of the United States in 
memory of David Josiah Brewer. City of Washington, April 30, 1910. 4° pp. 
47, port. 

This memorial contains the resolutions adopted and eulogies pronounced by 
the Bar of the Supreme Court in honor of the late David Josiah Brewer, Asso- 
ciate Justice of the Supreme Court of the United States. 

In Memoriam, Bronson Howard, 1842-1908. Founder and president of the 
American Dramatists' Club. Address delivered at the Memorial Meeting, Sun- 



1911] 



Booh Notices 97 



day, October 18, 1908, at the Lyceum Theatre, New York, with a brief biogra- 
phy and other appreciations and records of his dramatic works, including a list 
of his plays, with original casts. Published by American Dramatists' Club, 
1451 Broadway, New York. The Marion Press, Jamaica, Queensborough, 
N. Y., 1910. 8° pp. 130, illus. 

This tribute to the first American playwright who was never an actor con- 
tains the addresses delivered at the memorial exercises at the Lyceum Theatre, 
a tribute by Brander Matthews, reprinted from the North American Beview, 
two addresses delivered by Bronson Howard, a list of his plays with original 
casts, Bliss Carman's poem, a brief biography by Harry P. Mawson, and a re- 
miniscence by Daniel Frohrnan. John Ernest Warren, librarian, adds an ar- 
ticle entitled " Among his Books," enumerating some of the most precious vol- 
umes bequeathed to the Dramatists' Club. It should be remembered that Bron- 
son Howard, after he had practically retired from play-writing, was the leader 
in bringing about an amendment to the copyright laws making piracy of plays 
a misdemeanor. 

The Magazine of History, with notes and queries. Extra number. No. 11. Com- 
prising the journal of the Siege of Penobscot, by John Calef, M.D. ; to which is 
added Capt. Henry Mowat's t; Relatio7is," and biographical and topographical 
notes, edited by Nathan Goold, Librarian of the Maine Historical Society; 
and a narrative of a light company soldier's service in the 41st foot, 1807-1814, 
by Shadrack Byfield. William Abbatt, 141 East 25th Street, New York, 
1910. 8° pp. 295-384. 

Article 1 is the journal of a prominent member of the loyalist colony at Cas- 
tine, who was surgeon and acting chaplain at Fort George. A reprint of a map 
of the region accompanies the article. Article 2 is part of Capt. Mowat's ac- 
count of his experiences in America from 1759 to 1783, the original of which is 
in the possession of the Maine Historical Society. Article 3 is a reprint of a 
pamphlet printed in Bradford, England, 1840, and is made from the only original 
copy of the narrative known. This publication is very valuable as it brings be- 
fore the American public accounts written from a British standpoint concern- 
ing the Penobscot expedition of Saltonstall and Lovell, and the relations exist- 
ing between England and her Indian allies during the war of 1812. 

Proceedings of the Brookline Historical Society at the annual meeting, Jan. 19, 
1910. Brookline, Mass. Published by the Society, 1910. 8° pp. 45+5, illus. 

Annual reports, an account of the celebration of the centennial of the birth of 
Abraham Lincoln, and a scholarly essay on Gouverneur Morris by the late George 
S. Mann, form the literary chapters of the Proceedings. The president's ad- 
dress gives the history of three old houses of Brookline, which were built by 
Joseph Sewall, John and Lewis Tappan, and known as the David Hall Rice 
house (destroyed by lire, 1909), the Philbrick and Blake houses. Reference is 
made to the preservation of the Devotion house, and general improvements of 
the town in 1909. Personal impressions of Abraham Lincoln by William J. 
Seaver, who knew him in Springfield, 111., in 1856-7, form an interesting paper 
which was delivered at the centennial exercises. 

Proceedings and Transactions of the Royal Society of Canada. Third Series, 
Vol. 2, 1908. Part II. Chronological inventory of maps, plans, and atlases 
relating to New France and the 'province of Quebec, 1508-1908, by N. E. 
Dionne, M.D., LL.D. 8° pp. 124-f-G. 

This inventory is prefaced by a short essay comparing the authenticity of 
some of the earliest plans of the region. A description of each map is given 
and the publication or collection in which it may be found. Only British maps 
are noticed in English ; the rest of the publication is in French. 

Proceedings and transactions of the Royal Society of Canada. Third Series. 

Vol. III. Meeting of May, 1909. For sale by James Hope and Son, Ottawa; 

The Copp-Clark Co. (Ltd.), Toronto; Bernard Quaritch, London, England, 

1910. 8" pp. 243+106-H9G-r-[19]+242-r-23G-|-278, UlUS. 

This bulky volume of nearly 1400 pages contains, beside the report of busi- 
ness transacted, a large Dumber of essays and addresses, in English and French, 
upon a variety of subjects, biographical, historical, and scientific. The Talbot 
Papers, part two, are printed with index. 



98 Booh Notices [Jan. 

The founding of Charlestown by the Spragues. A glimpse of the beginning of the 
Massachusetts Bay settlement, by Henry Harrison Sprague, A.M. Boston, 
William B. Clark Co., 1910. 8° pp. 39. 

This pamphlet discusses the question of date of settlement of Charlestown, 
Mass., and contends that the town was settled in 1628, possibly before the ar- 
rival of Endicott, but at least before the winter of 1628-9. The argument is 
followed by short biographical sketches of the three brothers, Ralph, Richard, 
and William Sprague. A copy of the records of Charlestown, written by order 
of the town in 1664 by John Greene, after consultation with the oldest residents 
then living, is printed verbatim, and a half-tone facsimile of the agreement 
establishing town government in 1634 is inserted. Mr. Sprague claims that 
u the first settlers of Mishawam may be said historically to be the real founders 
of the first settlement of the Massachusetts Bay Colony and of the capital at 
Boston, in the year 1628." 

Laying of the corner stone of the Connecticut State Library and Supreme Court 
Building, at Hartford, May 25, 1909. Published by the State. Hartford, 
1909. Press of The Case, Lockwood and Brainard Co., Hartford, Conn. 8° 
pp. 39, illus. 

The ceremonies attending the laying of the cornerstone of the beautiful build- 
ing shown in the frontispiece of this book were impressive and imposing, and 
were participated in by the state government, the judiciary and the Grand Lodge 
of A. P. and A. M. The stone was laid with full masonic ceremonies, and the 
contents of the box deposited therein is given in detail. The book concludes 
with the address delivered by Simeon E. Baldwin, LL.D., Chief Justice of Con- 
necticut. 

Hartford City Directory, 1199, containing the names of the business men and 
other residents, their occupation and location, iohe?i known, to the number of 
nearly eight hundred, compiled by Prank D. Andrews. Privately printed, 
Vineland, N. J., 1910. 8° pp. 34. 

By means of advertisements in the Hartford Courant and Mercury, from manu- 
scripts in the author's possession dated 1799, and miscellaneous sources, Mr. 
Andrews has compiled a directory comprising about 16 per cent, of the popula- 
tion of the city of Hartford at that time. A business directory fills about twen- 
ty pages, and is followed by a list of residents of Hartford, town and city, in- 
cluding farmers. Mr. Andrews is secretary of the Vineland Historical Society 
and member of the Connecticut Historical Society. 

A history of Hatfield, Massachusetts, 1660-1910, by Daniel White Wells and 
Reuben Pield Wells. Published under the direction of F. C. H. Gibbons, 
Spriugtield, Mass. 8° pp. 536, illus. 

The volume is subdivided into three parts : I. An account of the develop- 
ment of the town from its first settlement. II. The houses and homes, with 
personal reminiscences, of the men and women of the last one hundred years ; 
historical account of religious societies and Smith Academy. III. Genealogies 
of the families of the first settlers. Accounts of Indian warfare, extracts from 
town, county and private records, military records, including rolls of honor in 
the Revolution and Civil War, civil and industrial history skillfully woven to- 
gether, besides portraits of old residents, scenes in Hatfield, England, and in its 
namesake in Massachusetts, make the volume a valuable contribution to the his- 
torical literature of Massachusetts. 

Haverhill town affairs one hundred years ago, compiled by William F. 
Wiiitciier, Woodsville, N. H. News, Book and Job Print, 1909. 8° pp. 48. 

The resolves of a little New Hampshire town meeting could do little toward 
preventing the war of 1812, but a perusal of them imparts the spirit of the 
people, which is expressed as follows : u While we . . . wholly . . . disappro- 
bate the policy of our national administration . . . we declare . . . our de- 
termination ... to support the Union at all hazard." The tax lists of 1809 
contain 219 names ; foot notes explain the identity of many taxpayers of Haver- 
hill, N. 11., at that date, and from a genealogical point of view are quite as 
interesting as the town records themselves. 



1911] 



Book Notices 99 



Becords of Littleton, Mass., Births and deaths from the earliest records in the 
Town Books, began in 1715. Littleton, Mass., 1900. Compiled by Joseph 
Alfred Harwood. The Patriot Press, Concord, Mass., and Huntley S. 
Turner, Ayer, Mass. Publication completed 1900. 8° pp. 542+178. 

This collection of records contains, beside the births and deaths mentioned 
on the title page, marriages and intentions, baptisms, and burials gathered from 
church records, gravestone inscriptions, bible, and other private records ; also 
genealogical notes from Samuel Smith's manuscripts in the Reuben Hoar Library. 
In culling extracts from Mr. Smith's papers, which cover other towns as well 
as Littleton, only residents of the town and their kin are included, except per- 
sons whose residence is not determined. The book is well arranged and com- 
prehensive, and has an index of names and places. 

Early records of the Town of Manchester, formerly Derryfield, N. H., 1817- 
1828. A complete and exact transcript of the records of the clerks as written 
in the town records of Manchester, Book No. 3, pages 179 to 462, inclusive, 
comprising Volume IV. of the printed records of the town; Vol. XI, Manchester 
Historic Association. Edited, with introduction, notes, and index, by George 
Waldo Bkowne. Manchester, N. H., published by authority of the City 
Council, under the auspices of the Manchester Historic Association, 1909. 
8° pp. 359, port. Price $2.00, net. Address Fred W. Lamb, Librarian M. H. A., 
452 Merrimack Street, Manchester, N. H. 

This volume of records covers a period of quietude, the greatest controversy 
being caused by the construction of the "Mammouth Road," which was begun 
in 1821 and was not settled till 1836. The separation of church and state makes 
its impress on the records. The population in 1830 was 887, with no indication 
that within sixteen years the town would be incorporated as a city with ten 
thousand inhabitants. Tax lists form a good share of the book. The frontis- 
piece is a half-tone portrait of General John Stark, 1728-1822. An index of 
names and a general index add to the value of the publication. 

The early records of the town of Providence, Volume XX., being the first part of 
the second book for the recording of deeds and called Deed Book No. 2. 
Printed under authority of the City Council of Providence by William E. 
Clarke, Record Commissioner. Providence, Snow & Farnham Co., City 
Printers, 1909. 8° pp. 5+549. 

Deeds and the returns of original "layouts" of land in the town of Provi- 
dence and a few other papers makeup this book. At this period (1705 to 1711) 
the town included all the towns and cities in the present County of Providence 
west of the Blackstone River. The original index is printed, and it, as well as 
the deeds, are literal copies. There is a good index of names and localities, 
also an alphabetical list of grantors and grantees, with brief descriptions of 
land. In the preface Mr. Clark gives credit to Miss Alice M. Cushing, who had 
charge of the final revision and proofreading. 

Some records of Sussex County, Delaware, compiled by Charles H. B. Turner, 
Lewes, Del. Printed by Allen, Lane and Scott, Philadelphia, 1909. 8° pp. 387, 
illus. 

If more books like this one could be written, the history of old localities on 
the Atlantic seaboard would receive valuable additions. Mr. Turner has done 
a great service to historians and genealogists by putting into a convenient form 
a mass of information that has been buried here and there in a section which 
was settled by the Dutch, captured by Swedes, twice taken by the Dutch, and 
twice by the English of the New Netherlands, and finally ceded to Pennsylvania — 
all in a space of fifty years. The book contains extracts from civil, court, 
probate, church, and proprietors' records, inscriptions on tombstones, letters, 
diaries, bible records, baptisms, and documents in relation to settlement, mili- 
tary history, etc. The book may be obtained by addressing the author. 

Centennial History of the First Presbyterian Church and Society, Weslfield. V. r. 
A compilation of the historical i><i)><rs given during the centennial celebration, 

December, 1908. Published Apr. 1910, Journal Press, Jamestown, N. \ 
8° pp. 150. illus. 

VOL. LXV. 8 



100 Booh Notices [Jan, 

This attractive pamphlet recites the history of a church which was established 
in 1808, at the intersection of the old French road to Chautauqua Lake and the 
road from the east to the Western Reserve. For ten years a faithful few kept 
their church organization as best they could without a pastor and without a 
church building. It was re-organized as the Westfield Church in 1819. The 
first chapter treats of the period from 1808 to 1849, and the second from 1849 
to 1908. Other chapters give accounts of the choir, Sunday-school, and other 
organizations within the church and society. The illustrations are portraits of 
early members, elders, pastors, and others, and pictures of the houses of wor- 
ship occupied at various periods. A list of members of the church is appended. 

Vital Records of Andover, Massachusetts, to the end of the year 1849. Vol. I. 
Births. Published by the Topsfield Historical Society, Topsfield, Mass., 1912 
[1910]. 8° pp. 391. ' 

Vital Records of Andover, 3Iassachu setts, to the end of the year 1849. Vol. II. 
Marriages and Deaths. Published by the Topsfield Historical Society, Tops- 
field, Mass., 1912 [1910]. 8° pp. 575. 

Vital Records of Chester, Massachusetts, to the year 1850. Published by the 
New England Historic Genealogical Society at the charge of the Eddy Town- 
Record Fund. Boston, 1911 [1910]. 8° pp. 256. 

Vital Records of Foxborough, Massachusetts, to the year 1850. Published by 
the New England Historic Genealogical Society at the charge of the Eddy 
Town-Record Fund. Boston, Mass., 1911 [1910]. 8° pp. 249. 

Vital Records of Hanson, Massachusetts, to the year 1850. Published by the 
New England Historic Genealogical Society at the charge of the Eddy Town- 
Record Fund. Boston, 1911 [1910]. 8° pp. 110. 

Vital Records of Haverhill, Massachusetts, to the end of the year 1849. Vol. II. 
Marriages and. Deaths. Published by the Topsfield Historical Society, Tops- 
field, Mass., 1911 [1910]. 8° pp. 499. 

Vital Records of Ipswich, Massachusetts, to the end of the year 1849. Vol. I. 
Births. Published by the Essex Institute, Salem, Mass., 1910. 8° pp. 404. 

Vital Records of Ipswich, MassaeMisetts, to the end of the year 1849. Vol. IL 
Marriages and Deaths. Published by the Essex Institute, Salem, Mass., 1910. 
8° pp. 721. 

Vital Records of Newbury, Massachusetts, to the end of the year 1849. Vol. I. 
Births. Published by the Essex Institute, Salem, Mass., 1911 [1910]. 8° pp. 
564. 

Vital Records of Newbury, Massachiisetts, to the end of the year 1849. Vol. II, 
Marriages and Deaths. Published by the Essex Institute, Salem, Mass., 1911 
[1910]. 8° pp. 759. 

Vital Records of Newburyport, Massachusetts, to the end of the year 1849. Vol. 
I. Births. Published by the Essex Institute, Salem, Mass. 1911 [1910]. 8° 
pp. 428. 

Vital Records of Pembroke, Massachusetts, to the year 1850. Published by the 
New England Historic Genealogical Societv at the charge of the Eddy Town- 
Record Fund, Boston, Mass. 1911 [1910]/ 8° pp. 465. 

Quinquennial catalogue of the officers and graduates of Harvard University, 
1636-1910. Cambridge, Mass. Published by the University. 1910. 8° pp. 
757+151. 

This volume contains extracts from the records of Massachusetts, bearing 
upon the organization and government of the college, the bequest of John Har- 
vard, the record of the bestowal of his name upon the college at Cambridge, 
and the facsimile of the record of the first meeting of the overseers. Follow- 
ing this brief Introduction arc the names of officers of government and Instruc- 
tion, names of graduates and holders of honorary degrees, and a list of officers 



1911] Booh Notices 101 

and graduates of the college. The dates of appointment and retirement of offi- 
cials are given. The graduates are arranged by classes, and year dates of death 
of deceased members are recorded. Complete indexes of officers and graduates 
form the appendix. 

A history of Company E of the 7th Connecticut Volunteer Infantry in the Civil 
War, compiled by Lt. Col. Jerome Tourtelotte. 1910. 8° pp. 218. 

This company from Windham Co., Conn., numbering eighty-nine men who were 
in service from 1861 to 1865, lost nine inaction, and five in prison. Fifty-six were 
wounded, and twenty-two were captured. The story of experiences in prison 
and on the battlefield, including the siege of Fort Wagner, is compiled from 
letters, diaries, and personal reminiscenses, substantiated by official documents. 
In many instances, says the author, this book does not agree with previous pub- 
lications. The appendix gives the roster of the company, service, date and 
place of birth, and. in case of deceased members, date and place of death; fol- 
lowed by statistics in regard to the company and an index of names and places, 
all arranged in a manner suitable for reference. 

The War. u Stonewall" Jackson, his campaigns and battles, the Regiment, as I 
saw them, by James H. Wood, Captain Co. D, 37th Va. Inf. Regt. The Eddy 
Press Corporation, Cumberland, Md., 1910. 12° pp. 181, illus. Price $1. 

We have come to the time when we all can give to the great commanders of 
both sides the honor they deserve. The soldiers themselves were the first to 
recognize the fact. " There is no purpose in this narrative," says Capt. Wood, 
" to reflect upon the valor and worth of the Federal soldier or his leaders. . . . 
It was simply a case of Greek meeting Greek, each being worthy of his foe- 
man's steel." The author's style is terse and graphic. The book is a fair, dis- 
passionate account of the campaigns of Jackson and his brigade as seen by a 
young Confederate officer who participated in them, inspired by admiration for 
his leader and belief in the justice of the cause he served. 

History of the 13th regiment, Vermont volunteers. War of 1861-1S65, by 
Ralph Orson Sturtevant and Carmi Lathrop Marsh. 1910. 4° pp. 863, 
illus. 

Only those who have attempted similar work can appreciate the labor which 
the late Mr. Sturtevant, seconded by Mr. Marsh, put into this book. It is sad 
to think that he did not live to see its completion. Following tributes to Presi- 
dent Lincoln, the war governors of Vermont, and the commanding officers of 
the regiment, is a plain statement of the service of the regiment, supplemented 
by short sketches of the lives of the rank and file. Portraits are grouped in 
pairs showing the soldier as he looked in 1862 and 1904. The last pages give 
the roster of the regiment with the present address or date of death of almost 
every man. Space is given to the proceedings of the 13th Vermont Association. 
Good paper, binding and presswork add to the permanent worth of the publi- 
cation. 

California Society of the Sons of the American Revolution. Constitution and by- 
laws and roll of members. Instituted at San Francisco, Oct. 22, 1875 os Sons 
of Revolutionary Sires. Compiled by T. A. Perkins and Edwin Bunnell, 
May 1910. 16° pp. 31. 

Register of the Society Sons of the Revolution in the State of California, eighteenth 
year, 1910. Los Angeles, June 17, 1910. 4° unp., illus. 

In this finely executed publication are recorded the doings of the society for 
the last three years, the present roll of officers and members, portraits of mem- 
bers which have not been presented in former publications, and the names of 
i hose admitted to membership --ince 1907, with ancestors. A page, in Memoriam, 
honors twenty de< eased members. 

Tear book of (lie Sods of the Revolution inthe State of New York^ published by 

the Sons of the Revolution in the State of New York, 1909. 4" pp. Its, illus. 

This handsomely bound and finely Illustrated volume contains, beside the 
usual lists of past an' I present officers, the constitution of the society, etc., a roll 
of members and their ancestors, a roll of the latter with records of their ser- 
es in the Revolution, a li-t of deceased members of the society with (late of 



102 Booh Notices [Jan. 

death, and a list of the battles of the Revolutionary war arranged chronologically. 
The book concludes with Lord Brougham's tribute to Washiugton. The illus- 
trations are portraits of past presidents of the order and other distinguished 
men, copies of celebrated patriotic paintings, memorials and tablets erected by 
the society, and exterior and interior views of Fraunce's tavern, where Wash- 
ington bade farewell to his officers, now the headquarters of the Sons. It is 
one of the most artistic publications that has come into our hands this season. 

The Homestead of a Colonial Dame, by Alice Crary Sutcliffe. Press of the 
A. V. Haight Co., Poughkeesie, N. Y., 1909. 8° pp. 57, illus. 

This pamphlet, printed on heavy paper and illustrated with fine half-tone re- 
productions of paintings and photographs, is an attractive addition to tradi- 
tional and historical lore. It is dedicated to the author's mother, Mrs. Robert 
Fulton Crary, "the colonial dame who owns, and adorns by her presence, the 
homestead of her grandmother of the fifth generation, Madam Brett." The 
father of Madam Brett came to this country in 1654, and became mayor of 
New York. She was the first white woman to establish her home in the high- 
lands of the Hudson River. "Indians, as well as pioneer settlers of her own 
race, accorded love and honor to her name." 

Justice to the Jews. The story of what he has done for the world. New and re- 
vised edition, by Madison C. Peters. New York, The Trow Press, 1910. 
12» pp. 244. 

This book is an appeal written by a Christian minister. Taking history as his 
authority, he cites cases where not only Jewish money but Jewish brain have 
helped in the progress of the world's great achievements. The Jews have been 
discoverers, inventors, financiers, soldiers, philanthropists, and reformers. The 
writer demands for the Jew the square deal — all he asks is justice. 

The Marston Bestaurants, a brief history, by Capt. George W. Eldridge. 
16° pp. 23, illus. 

This little history will be interesting to thousands who have enjoyed Mars- 
ton's restaurants in Boston. It is a story with a moral, illustrating the growth 
and success of an enterprise which is the result of sixty years of honest dealing 
and strict attention to the smallest details that make for the comfort of patrons. 

Home making audits philosophy, illustrated by a nesting branch of the Archibalds, 
by William Charles Archibald. Boston, Mass., 1910. 4° pp. 12-+-506, illus. 
Price, morocco, $10 ; leather, $7.50 ; cloth, $5, postpaid. Address the author, 
203 Sudbury Building, Boston, Mass. 

Mr. Archibald has drawn a pleasing picture of what home life should be, 
illustrated by sketches of his boyhood days in Musquoduboit, N. S. His de- 
parture from home, his experiences during the Civil War, and the hold which 
his mother had upon his young manhood, are vividly presented. Part 4 is de- 
voted to the origin and history of the Archibald clan, following its Scotch-Irish 
progenitors to Londonderry, N. H., and from there to the Acadian region of 
Nova Scotia after the expulsion of the French. The book concludes with a 
directory of heads of families bearing the Archibald name in various provinces 
of the British dominions and almost every state in this country. 

Library of Congress. Journals of the Continental Congress, 1774-1789, edited 
from the original records of the Library of Congress, by Gaillard Hunt, chief, 
division of manuscripts. Vol. XVI, 1780, Jan 1— May 5. Washington, 
Government Printing Office, 1910. 4° pp. 1-414. 

Library of Congress. Journals of the Continental Congress, 1774-1789, edited 
from the original records of the Library of Congress, by Gaillard Hunt, chief, 
division of manuscripts. Vol. XVII, 1780, May 6— September 6. Washing- 
ton, Government Printing Office, 1910. 4<> pp. 415-808. 



ERRATUM 
Page 31, line 20,/or 1774 read 1775. 



THE 
NEW ENGLAND 

HISTORICAL AND GENEALOGICAL 

REGISTER 



APRIL, 1911 



DELORAINE PENDRE COREY 

By Charles Edward Manx, of Maiden, Mass. 

Deloraixe Pendre Corey, historian of Maiden and universally 
recognized as her first citizen, died at his home in that city Friday, 
May 6, 1910. Mr. Corey was born in South Maiden, now Everett, 
September 4, 1836, the son of Solomon Pendre and Martha- 
Skinner (Waite) Corey. His ancestry was interesting. He was 
in the seventh generation from William Corey, a freeman of Ports- 
mouth, and made a freeman of Rhode Island and Providence Plan- 
tations May 18, 1658, the line being William, 1 William, 2 Benjamin, 3 
Benjamin 4 (married Prudence, daughter of Solomon and Patience 
(Ray) Pendre), Capt. Solomon 5 (married Charlotte (Delano) Win- 
sor), Solomon Pendre, 6 Deloraine Pendre. 7 Through his grandmo- 
ther, Charlotte Delano ( Winsor) Corey, he was descended from John 
and Priscilla (Mullins) Alden, the Plymouth Pilgrims, thus : Wil- 
liam 1 Mullins, John and Priscilla 2 (Mullins) Alden, William and 
Elizabeth 3 (Alden) Pabodie, John and Mercy 4 (Pabodie) Simmons, 
Ebenezer and Martha 5 (Simmons) Delano, Joshua 6 and Hopestill( Pe- 
terson) Delano, Samuel and Rhoda 7 (Delano) Winsor, Peter 8 and 
Charlotte (Delano) Winsor, Charlotte Delano 9 (Winsor) Corey. 
Through his mother, Martha Skinner (Waite) Corey, he was descend- 
ed from Maiden's two Puritan captains, Joseph Hills, who made the 
first compilation of Massachusetts Bay laws (1648), of which but a 
single copy is known to be in existence, and who is supposed to have 
given the name of his English home, Mauldon, to Mr. Corey's native 
town, and John Waite. One of the chapters in Mr. Corey's ff History 
of Maiden " is devoted to a discussion of the lives and eminent public 
services of these two men. The maternal line is as follows : Joseph 1 
and Rose (Clerke) Hills, John 2 (son of Samuel 1 ) and Mary 2 (Hills) 
Waite, Joseph 3 and Mercy (Tufts) Waite, Thomas 4 and Deborah 
(Sargeant) Waite, Thomas 5 and Mary (Sprague) Waite, Thomas - 
and Lvdia (Ilitchins) Waite, Thomas 7 and Hannah (Cheever) 
Waite, Martha-Skinner 1 * Waite. Through Hannah (Cheever) 
Waite, Mr. Corey traced his ascent to Rev. Thomas Cheever, the 
first minister of Rumney Marsh (Chelsea), and his more famous son, 
Ezekiel Cheever, the New England schoolmaster; also to Capt. 
Joseph Cheever who led his company at Bunker Hill and Trenton, 
vol. lxv. 8 



104 Deloraine Pendre Corey [April 

another Revolutionary sire having been Peter Winsor, a non-com- 
missioned officer who was at the surrender of Burgoyne. Job Lane, 
the builder of the Bell Rock church, where stands Maiden's memo- 
rial park and monument, was an ancestor of Mr. Corey, and he in- 
cluded eight passengers upon the Mayflower in various lines of 
ascent. 

Mr. Corey's childhood and youth w r ere spent in the public schools 
of Maiden. At the age of seventeen he became a book-keeper in 
the hardware business of Flint & Carter, of Boston, and here he 
remained thirteen years, becoming a partner of the concern in 1866, 
which, under the names of Stratton, Orton & Corey, and Stratton, 
Corey & Co., continued the business until the great fire of 1872. 
A new firm, Corey, Brooks & Co., was then formed, from which 
he retired in 1877 on the formation of the Maverick Oil Company, 
of which he soon became treasurer, a position he retained when the 
corporation ceased and the business was merged in and continued 
by the Boston department of the Standard Oil Company. He re- 
tired from active business in 1898. 

Mr. Corey's determination to become an authority upon the history 
of Maiden must have been formed before he left the public schools 
of his birthplace. He wrote the preface to his History, covering 
the period from 1633 to 1785, in 1898, and there said that the work 
of collecting and verifying facts had been carried on for more than 
forty-five years. In 1903 the Vital Records of Maiden were pub- 
lished, having been compiled by a commission of which Mr. Corey 
was chairman. Certain of the earlier record books were in such a 
dilapidated condition that it was necessary to treat them first by the 
Emery process for permanent preservation before they could be used, 
and then it was found that many pages were partially lost or unde- 
cipherable. In this emergency Mr. Corey produced exact copies 
of all the entries, made by himself in the closing year of the Civil 
War with his characteristic care and accuracy. Many dates were 
supplied, as is usual, from the gravestone records in the ancient Bell 
Rock Cemetery ; and here again the work of his earlier years proved 
useful, for with his son Arthur he had spent many toilsome days in 
copying the inscriptions, in frequent instances from stones which 
have since disappeared. It is expected that the Maiden Historical 
Society will publish these inscriptions from Mr. Corey's manuscript. 
Mr. Corey's editing of the Maiden vital records differed from the 
usual style in several respects. He published the records of mar- 
riage intentions in a separate section of the book, while against each 
entry of a birth, marriage or death he placed the figures showing 
the page on which it appears in the original record, each feature, of 
course, adding greatly to the value of the book. These elements ot 
infinite pains to secure accuracy and add to the value of his work 
appear in even a more marked degree in his History. A printed 
collection of the footnotes to that work would be a valuable histori- 



1911] Deloraine Pendre Corey 105 

cal volume in themselves, while the narrative, prepared in his later 
life, after years of study had made him absolutely familiar with his 
subject, is attractive in matter and easy and pure in style. An old 
friend, Daniel L. Milliken, since deceased, wrote of this History in 
1903 : f For this work he began collecting materials when about 
sixteen years of age. That a boy of sixteen should step so far out 
of the ordinary track and trend of boyhood thought and action is 
certainly remarkable, and of great significance. We believe it to 
be without a parallel in American biography. Displaying and culti- 
vating the historic spirit thus early, it is easy to understand what 
every page of his completed book so clearly reveals, that the pro- 
duction of that great work was with him, from first to last, a labor 
of love." Another reviewer said : r The result is a history far 
above the average town history in every respect. He has the in- 
stinct of a true historian, and the book is a noble gift to the public. 
As a picture of life prior to 1785, it is a model." A writer in the 
American Historical Review said : " It is entitled to high rank in 
the department of local history because of its valuable contribution 
to knowledge, and the admirable manner of its execution." 

In the April number of the Register, 1878, Mr. Corey pub- 
lished a genealogy of the Waite family of Maiden, which he intended 
to be the beginning of a larger history of the descendants of Capt. 
John Wayte. A mass of material for this book remains, and this 
he was intending to arrange and publish at the time of his death. 
His widow feels it to be a sacred duty to have the work completed 
and published. In Drake's History of Middlesex county the history 
of Maiden is by Mr. Corey, and it is both readable and reliable. In 
1891 he published a memorial of his only son, Arthur Deloraine 
Corey, Ph.D., which has gone through three editions. His chapter 
on l< Joseph Hills and the Massachusetts Laws in 1648 " from the 
History, was reprinted as a separate pamphlet in 1899. In the 
New England Magazine, vol. xx, pp. 357-378, appears his story 
"Two Centuries and a Half in Maiden." His f Memorial of the 
Celebration of the Two Hundred and Fiftieth Anniversary of the 
Incorporation of the town of Maiden, Mass.," a volume of over 350 
pages, was issued in 1900 ; a memoir of John Ward Dean, A.M., 
originally published in the Register, in 1902 ; the vital statistics 
of Maiden in 1902 ; and a memoir of William Blake Trask, A.M., 
reprinted from the Register, in 1907. 

The beautiful Converse Memorial Library in Maiden is Mr. Co- 
rey's monument. For over three decades, from its establishment, 
he was president of the board of trustees of the Maiden public libra- 
ry. To it he gave incessant labor, being found more often at his 
desk in the library building in the evening, and at all times during 
his later years, than at any other place. The building was the last 
work of the late H. H. Richardson, and is a memorial to Frank 
Eugene Converse, son of the late Hon. Elisha S. Converse, who 



106 Deloraine Pendre Corey [April 

practically placed his wealth at the disposal of Mr. Corey to the ex- 
tent that was needed to erect the building, equip it, embellish the 
two art galleries with rare paintings, and liberally endow it for its 
future needs. This done, Mr. Corey gave his best endeavor to the 
work of making the library meet the demand of the community for 
which it was established. So great was the appreciation of his value 
and special knowledge that he was long a member of the Free Pub- 
lic Library Commission of the Commonwealth, holding the office of 
chairman until a few months before his death. 

Mr. Corey never sought elective office but never refused requests 
for public service in other directions. He was a member of the 
board of Trustees of Public Reservations and one of the trustees 
section of the American Library Association, taking particular de- 
light in attending the association's annual meetings. He was a life 
member of the New England Historic Genealogical Society, a mem- 
ber of the American Antiquarian Society, an honorary member of 
the New York Genealogical and Biographical Society, and the Som- 
erville Historical Society. He was active in the formation of the 
Maiden Historical Society, and was many years its president, declin- 
ing a re-election at the last annual meeting. He took the initiative 
for Maiden's two hundred and fiftieth anniversary celebration and 
was its moving spirit. Upon him, as the best fitted man in every 
way, fell the duty of preparing the inscriptions which were placed 
upon the Bell Rock memorial and similar historic tablets. The 
bowlder which stands near the site of the home of Joseph Hills in 
Maiden square was his gift, and bears a filial tribute to his worthy 
ancestor. 

No finer evidence could have been given of the eminent place he 
held in the esteem of his fellow-citizens, nor of the hold he had upon 
their affections, than the request from leading citizens, made upon 
his completion of thirty years' service as chairman of the public 
library trustees, that he accept a complimentary banquet. Unwil- 
lingly he consented, and hundreds of Maiden citizens, with distin- 
guished guests from abroad, gathered to do him honor. It was a 
tribute such as is given few men in private life under any circum- 
stances. 

Mr. Corey was innately modest. A conviction of public duty 
would draw him into the open, but he loved rather the quiet of his 
library. His home was a magazine of historic and antiquarian lore, 
and he accumulated one of the best private libraries upon these sub- 
jects in the commonwealth. The walls of his home, as of the art 
galleries of the Converse Memorial library, bear abundant evidence 
of his love for and taste in art, and he was equally devoted to music, 
as all admitted to his fireside can testify. 

On May 11, 1865, Mr. Corey married Isabella, daughter of Dana 
and Isabella (Cowdrey) Holden. Their only child, Arthur Delo- 
raine Corey, graduated from Harvard university, and received the 



1911] Revolutionary Soldiers of York County, Me. 107 

degree of Ph.D. from the Royal Friedrich Wilhelm university of 
Berlin, Germany, in 1891. He died in Maiden August 17 of the 
same year. It seemed ever after that the love the stricken parents 
had lavished upon him in life was given to all young people in gen- 
eral, especially to those who needed it most. Within a year of his 
death, Mr. Corey and his wife joined in meeting the expense of 
remodelling the Young Men's Christian Association building in 
Maiden and fitting up attractive quarters for a boys' department, to 
be a memorial to Arthur Deloraine Corey. Within a few days of his 
death Mr. Corey attended nightly meetings held to raise a large sum 
of money for the work of the same association, making an initial 
gift of many thousands and adding to it from time to time as sub- 
scriptions lagged. His last appearance in public was at one of these 
meetings. While a regular attendant at the First Baptist Church in 
Maiden, Mr. Corey was extremely broad in his religious sympathies, 
and though everywhere recognized as representing the finest type of 
the Christian gentleman, supporting all good causes with voice, pen 
and purse, he was in no sense sectarian. 

Mr. Corey was elected a member of the New England Historic 
Genealogical Society in 1863, and signally proved his interest in the 
Society and in the Register as a member of the Register Club, 
which for many years guaranteed the expenses of its publication, 
thus sustaining its work at a critical time. His attitude here was 
typical of the man, able, kindly, generous ; alert to meet every 
crisis, putting his heart, his time and his means into every worthy 
cause ; willing to labor for years with no reward other than a knowl- 
edge that thereby priceless memorials of the past were preserved ; 
patient when his work was unappreciated, grateful but modest when 
recognition came ; bearing his personal sorrows bravely, and meeting 
failing health and the summons of the Last Messenger with resig- 
nation — this world can never have too many men like him. 



REVOLUTIONARY SOLDIERS OF YORK COUNTY, 

MAINE 

Communicated by George Walter Chamberlain, M.S., of Maiden, Mass. 

[Continued from 82] 

John Fenderson, 18 aged 64 years, of Parsonsfield, July 18, 1820. Pri- 
vate in Capt. Horn's Co., Col. Henry Jackson's Regt., Mass. line. Origi- 
nal declaration made Apr. 20, 1818. Pension No. 3,240. Affirmed. 
Family: Mary, wife, aged 65; Sally, daughter, aged 24; Joseph Fen- 
derson, aged 10. (38: 312) 

David Fitzgerald, aged 60 years, of York, July 5, 1820. Private in Capt. 
Samuel Derby's Co., Col. Prescott's Regt, Mass. line. Original decla- 

)3 John Fenderson enlisted from Scarborough, and was living at Parsonsfield in 1835. 



108 Revolutionary Soldiers of York County, Me, [April 

ration made Apr. 2, 1819. Pension No. 12,402. Reversed. Family : 
Martha Fitzgerald, daughter, aged 2Q. (313) 

Aaron Fogg, aged 58 years, of Hollis, July 18, 1820. In Capts. Walker's 
& Bradbury's Co., Col. Sprout's Regt., Mass. line. Original declaration 
made Apr. 13, 1818. Pension No. 7,476. Affirmed. No family. 
(314) 

Elias Foss, 14 aged 54 years, of Limington, July 18, 1820. Private in 
Capt. Daniel Lunt's Co., Col. Benjamin Tupper's Regt., Mass. line. 
Original declaration made April 24, 1818. Pension No. 5,707. Re- 
versed. Family : Anna, wife, aged 50 ; Elas \_sic~\ Foss, aged 14 ; 
Susanna Foss, aged 11. (316) 

Parker Foster, 16 aged 59 years, of Eliot, July 5, 1820. Private & 
Serjeant in Capt. King's Co., Col. Henry Jackson's Regt., Mass. line. 
Original declaration made Apr. 1, 1818. Pension No. 8,563. Affirmed. 
Family : Elizabeth Foster, aged 45 ; Joseph Foster, aged 1 1 ; Nathan- 
iel Foster, aged 9 ; Catharine Foster, aged 7 ; Abigail Foster, aged 5, 
Caroline Foster, aged 2. (317) 

James Foy, aged 67 years, of Newfield, July 19, 1820. In Capt. James 
Osgood's Co., Col. Bettis's Regt., Newhampshire line. Original declara- 
tion made July 7, 1818. Pension No. 17,901. Affirmed. Family: 
Mary, wife, aged 69. (315) 

John Freeman, aged 84 years, of York, July 4, 1820. Private in the 
Mass. line (Co. & Regt. not given). Original declaration made Apr. 
13,1818. Pension No. 8,585. Affirmed. Family: Esther Freeman, 
wife, aged 82. (319) 

Nathaniel Frost, 16 aged 66 years, of Eliot, July 4, 1820. Serjeant in 
Capt. Burbank's Co., Col. Samuel Brewer's Regt., Mass. line. Original 
declaration made April 1, 1818. Pension No. 8,564. Affirmed. Fam- 
ily : Sarah Frost, aged 57 ; Joshua Frost, aged 13. (320) 

Stephen Frost, 17 aged 78 years, of Berwick, July 4, 1820. Marine on 
board the U. S. ship Raleigh, Capt. Thomas Thompson, Commander. 
Original declaration made Apr. 7, 1818. Pension No. 7,686. Affirmed. 
Family: Betsy, wife, aged 76. (321) 

William Frost, Esq., aged 73 years, of York, July 4, 1820. Ensign in 
Capt. Leighton's Co., Col. James Scamman's Regt., Mass. line. Origi- 
nal declaration made Apr. 13, 1818. Pension No. 5,920. Affirmed. 
Family : Elizabeth Frost, wife, aged 65 ; Elizabeth Frost, daughter, 
aged 43 : Sophia Frost, daughter, aged 38 ; Lucy Frost, daughter, aged 
30; William P. Frost, aged 24. (322) 

Joseph Giles, aged 74 years, of Shapleigh, July 18, 1820. Private in 
Capt. James Osgood's Co., Col. Henry Beetle's Regt., Newhampshire 
line. Original declaration made Apr. 17, 1818. Pension No. 11,907. 
Affirmed. . Family: Lydia Giles, wife, aged 75. (323) 

Joseph Gilpatrick, 18 aged 57 years, of Wells, July 18, 1820. Private in 
Capt. Haskell's Co., Cols. Shepard's & Jackson's Regt., Mass. line. Ori- 
ginal declaration made Apr. 9, 1818. Pension No. 5,913. Not for- 
warded. Family: children, Polly Gilpatrick, aged 31; Joseph Gilpat- 

14 Elias Foss enlisted from Scarborough, and was living at Limington in 1835. 

15 Parker Foster enlisted from Kittery, and was living at Eliot in 1835. 

16 .Nathaniel Frost enlisted from Kittery, and d. at Eliot Feb. 17, 1829. His widow 
Sarah was living there in 1835. 

17 Stephen Frost enlisted from Berwick, and d. there Oct. 8, 1824. His widow Sarah 
was living there in 1835. 

18 Joseph Gilpatrick enlisted from Wells, and was living at Kennebunk in 1835. 



1911] Revolutionary Soldiers of York County , Me. 109 

rick, aged 20 ; James Gilpatrick, aged 18 ; Nancy Gilpatrick, aged 18. 
(324) 

Philip Goldthwait, aged 67 years, of Biddeford, July 18, 1820. Sol- 
dier in Capt. Hogan's Co., Col. Shelden's Regt., Conn. line. Original 
declaration made Apr. 29, 1818. Pension No. 5,694. Reversed. 
Family : Martha, wife, aged 55 ; Mary, daughter, aged 23 ; Tristram, 
son, aged 18 ; Philip, son, aged 14 ; W. H. King, grandson, aged 3. (325) 

Adam Goodwin, aged 61 years, of Berwick, July 4, 1820. Private in 
Capt, Alden's Co., Col. Bailey's Regt., Mass. line. Original declaration 
made June 27, 1818. Pension No. 8,383. Reversed. Family: Sally, 
wife, aged 58 ; Edmund, son, aged 25 ; Polly, daughter, aged 24 ; Sally, 
daughter, aged 22 ; Reuben, son, aged 15 ; Eastman, grandson, aged 3. 
(326) 

Benjamin Goodwin, aged 66 years, of Shapleigh, July 18, 1820. Pri- 
vate in Capt. Hubbard's Co., Col. Peirce Long's Regt., Newhampshire 
line. Original declaration made May 28, 1818. Pension No. 14,425. 
Reversed. Family, children, Eunice, aged 29 ; Olive, aged 26. (327) 

Paul Goodwin, aged 73 years, of Wells, July 4, 1*20. Private in Capt. 
Sayer's Co., Col. Patterson's Regt., Mass. line, and in several other corps. 
Original declaration made Apr. 8, 1818. Pension No. 7,716. Affirmed. 
Family : Wife, aged 73 ; Daughter, aged 53 ; granddaughter, aged 
15. (328) 

Alexander Goold, aged 69 years, of. Eliot, July 4, 1820. Marine on 
board the continental ship of War Raleigh, commanded by Thomas 
Thompson. Original declaration made Apr. 1, 1818. Pension No. 
10,246. Reversed. Family: Elizabeth Goold, aged 54 ; Charity Goold, 
aged 12 ; Ivory Goold, aged 10 ; James Goold, aged 8. (329) 

Daniel Goold, aged 71 years, of Eliot, July 4, 1820. Private in Capts. 
Lane's & Coburn's Co., Cols. Alden's & Brooks's Regt, Mass. line. Ori- 
ginal declaration made Apr. 1, 1818. Pension No. 11,581. Affirmed. 
Family: Lorania Goold, aged 36; Dependance Goold, aged 34; Ro- 
sanna Goold, aged 25 ; Elizabeth Goold, aged 24 ; Polly Goold, aged 17. 
(330) 

John Goold, aged 66 years, of Eliot, July 4, 1820. In Capt. Silas Wilde's 
Co., Col. Phinney's Regt., Mass. line. Original declaration made Apr. 
1, 1818. Pension No. 8,382. Affirmed. Family: Margaret Goold, 
aged 59 ; Sally Goold, aged 39 ; Ruth Goold, aged 28 ; Mary Goold, 
aged 2 ; John Kenney, aged 7 months. (331) 

Edward Grant, aged 66 years, of Berwick, July 4, 1820. In Capt. 
Carr's Co., Col. Reed's Regt., Newhampshire line. Original declaration 
made Apr. 4, 1818. Pension No. 12,642. Affirmed. Family: Re- 
becca, daughter, aged 16; Charles, son, aged 19. (332 )^ 

John Grant, aged 75 years, of Wells, July 5, 1820. Quartermaster in 
Col. Henrv Jackson's Regt., Mass. line. Original declaration made 
Apr. 8, 1818. Pension No. 5,936. Affirmed. No family. (333) 

Joshua Grant, 19 aged 75 years, of York, July 4, 1820. Sergeant in 
Capt. Samuel Derby's Co., Col. Scamman's Regt., Mass. line. Original 
declaration made Apr. 13, 1818. Pension No. 11,582. Reversed. 
Family : Abigail Grant, wife, aged 73 ; Mary Grant, aged 30 ; Stephen 
Stackpole, aged 10. (334) 

William Grant, 20 aged 75 years, of Lebanon, July 18, 1820. Private in 

19 Joshua Grant enlisted from York, and d. there in June 1825. His widow Abigail 
wax living there in 1835. 
s * William Grant's wife Mary d. at Lebanon, without issue, Sept. 4, 1822. 



110 Revolutionary Soldiers of York County, Me. [April 

Capt. James Carr's Co., Col. George Read's Regt., Mass. line. Original 
declaration made Apr. 15, 1818. Pension No. 5,898. Affirmed. Family: 
Mary, wife, aged 79. (335) 

John Guilford, 21 aged 56 years, of Hollis, July 20, 1820. Private in 
Capt. Hight's Co., Cols. Groton's & Jackson's Regt., Mass. line. Original 
declaration made Apr. 13, 1818. Pension No. 5,492. Reversed. Family : 
Sally Guilford, aged 54 ; Polly Guilford, aged 27 ; Joseph Guilford, 
aged 15; Daniel Guilford, aged 12. (336) 

Richard Haley, aged 79 years, of Alfred, July 18, 1820. Private in 
Capt. Nathan Goodale's Co., Col. Newall's Regt., Mass. line. Original 
declaration made Apr. 8, 1818. Pension No. 5,919. Affirmed. Family: 
Mary Haley, wife, aged 75 ; Rachel Avery, granddaughter, aged 12. 
(338) 

Jonathan Hamilton, aged 62 years, of Berwick, July 18, 1820. Private 
in Capt. Samuel Derby's Co., Col. Bailey's Regt., Mass. line. Original 
declaration made Mar. 30, 1818. Pension No. 7,739. Affirmed. Family: 
Lydia, wife, aged 57. (337) 

Gideon Hanscom, 22 aged 64 years, of Lyman, July 4, 1820. Private in 
Capt. Tyler's Co., Col. Phinney's Regt., Mass. line. Original declara- 
tion made Apr. 8, 1818. Pension No. 2,340. Affirmed. Family: wife, 
aged 68; child, Lydia, aged 20. (339) 

Nathaniel Hanscom, 23 aged 63 years, of Eliot, July 4, 1820. Private 
in Capt. Donnell's Co., Col. Brewer's Regt., Mass. line. Original de- 
claration made Apr. 1, 1818. Pension No. 8,567. Affirmed. Family: 
Lucy Hanscom, aged 63 ; Simon Hanscom, aged 18 ; Shuah Hanscom, 
aged 16. (340) 

Robert Hanscom, aged 58 years, of Arundel, July 19, 1820. Private in 
Capt. Fox's Co., Col. Henry Jackson's Regt., Mass. line. Original de- 
claration made Apr. 8, 1818. Pension No. 13,295. Affirmed. No 
family. (341) 

Jonathan Hanson, aged 57 years, of Waterborough, July 18, 1820. 
Private in Capt. Pritchard's Co., Cols. Grafton's & Hull's Regt., Mass. 
line. Not forwarded. Family : Isaac Hanson, father, aged 83 ; Lydia 
Hanson, wife, aged 40; Isaac Hanson, aged 16. (342) 

Stephen Hardison, aged sixty nith [sic] years, of Berwick, July 18, 
1820. Private in Capt. Eben r Sullivan's Co., Col. Patterson's Regt., 
Mass. line. Original declaration made Apr. 5, 1818. Pension No. 
7,734. Reversed. Family : Peggy, wife, aged 66 ; Esther, daughter, 
aged 41. (343) 

James Hart, aged 73, of York, July 4, 1820. Lieutenant & Adjutant in 
Capt. Barns's Co., Col. Jonathan Ward's Regt., Mass. line. Original de- 
claration made Apr. 8, 1818. Pension No. 3,508. Affirmed. Family: 
wife, Lydia, aged 56. (345) 

William Harvey, 24 aged 60, of South Berwick, July 18, 1820. Ser- 
jeant in Capt. Haskell's Co., Col. Henry Jackson's Regt., Mass. line. 
Original declaration made June 6, 1818. Pension No. 8,384. Reversed. 
Family : Keziah, wife, aged 47 ; Martha, daughter, aged 22 ; Stephen, son, 
aged 12 ; Mary Jane, daughter, aged 10 ; Howard, son, aged 4. (346) 

21 John Guilford enlisted from Scarborough, and was living at Hollis in 1835. 

22 Gideon Hanscom d. at Lyman, and his widow Mehitable was living at Kennebunk- 
port in 1835. 

23 Nathaniel Hanscom enlisted from Kittery, and d. at Eliot in April 1830. His widow 
Lucy was living in Eliot in 1835. 

34 William Harvey enlisted from Kittery, and was living at South Berwick in 1835. 



1911] Revolutionary Soldiers of York County, Me, 111 

Elijah Hatch, aged 64 years, of Wells, July 4, 1820. Private in Capt. 
Danl. Wheelwright's Co., Col. B. Tupper's Regt., Mass. line. Original 
declaration made Apr. 8, 1818. Pension No. 14,254. Reversed. Family : 
Dorcas, wife, aged 36 ; Huldah, daughter, aged 10; Elijah, son, aged 7 ; 
Josiah, son, aged 5 ; Silvanus, son, aged 2. (344) 

James Heard, aged 71, of Newfield, July 19, 1820. Private in Capt. 
Nathaniel Wade's Co., Col. Moses Little's Regt., Mass. line. Original 
declaration made Apr. 28, 1818. Pension No. 14,389. Affirmed. Family : 
Elizabeth, wife, aged 65 ; grandchild, Robt. Heard, aged 4. (347) 

Daniel Hill, 25 aged 64, of Buxton, July 19, 1820. Ensign in Capt. 
Robert Davis's Co., Col. Joseph Vose's Regt., Mass. line. Original de- 
claration made April 22, 181-. Pension No. 5,719. Affirmed. Fam- 
ily : Phebe HD1, aged 50 ; Richard Hill, aged 18 ; Peter Hill, aged 16 ; 
Joseph Hill, aged 1*4. (351) 

Samuel Hill, aged 59, of Eliot, July 4, 1820. Marine on board the U. S. 
ship of war Ranger, commanded by Thomas Simpson. Original declara- 
tion made Apr. 1, 1818. Pension No. 10,422. Affirmed. Family: 
Rebecca Hill, aged 60 ; Betsy D. Hill, aged 30. (352) 

Ebenezer Hilton, aged 56, of Wells, July 4, 1820. Private in Capt. 
Samuel Derby's Co., Col. Baily's Regt., Mass. line. Original declara- 
tion made Apr. 8, 1818. Pension No. 5,933. Reversed. Family: 
Ralph, son, aged 20; Phila, daughter, aged 17; Daniel, son, aged 12. 
(349) 

Edward Hilton, 26 aged 55, of Wells, July 4, 1820. In Capt. Simeon 
Lord's Co., Col. Sprout's Regt., Mass. line. Original declaration made 
Apr. 7, 1818. Pension No. 7,711. Reversed. Family: Mary, wife, 
aged 57; Sophia, daughter, aged 19; Edward, son, aged 16; Mary, 
daughter, aged 14; Woodbury, son, aged 10. (348) 

Joseph Hilton, aged 61, of Wells, July 4, 1820. Private in Capt. Sam- 
uel Derby's Co., Col. Prescott's Regt., Mass. line. Original declaration 
made Apr. 8, 1818. Pension No. 11,571. Reversed. Family: Miri- 
am, wife, aged 75; Ebenezer, son, aged 34; Nancy, daughter, aged 36; 
Nathaniel, grandchild, aged 6. (350) 

William Hob son, aged 90, of Buxton, July 19, 1820. Private in Capt. 
Emerson's Co., Col. Tupper's Regt., Mass. line. Original declaration 
made Apr. 13, 1818. Pension No. 5,716. Affirmed. No family. (353) 

Benjamin Hodsdon, aged 63, of South Berwick, July 4, 1820. Private 
in Capt. Alden's Co., Col. Bailey's Regt., Mass. line. Original declara- 
tion made Mar. 31, 1818. Pension No. 7,689. Affirmed. Family: 
Sarah, wife, aged 62. (354) 

Samuel Hodsdon, 27 aged 65, of South Berwick, July 4, 1820. Private 
in Capt. Beal's Co., Col. Scammell's Regt., Newhampshire line. Origi- 
nal declaration made Mar. 31, 1818. Pension No. 7,737. Affirmed. 
Family : Anna, wife, aged 59 ; Moses, grandson, aged 2. (355) 

Jonathan Horn, aged 65, of Shapleigh, July 18, 1820. Marine in the 
Navy of the Revolution. Original declaration made Apr. 15, 1818. 
Pension No. 11,393. Reversed. Family: Abra, wife, aged 50 ; Wil- 
liam, son, aged 17; Heard, son, aged 14; Jonathan, son, aged 8; Ap- 

85 Daniel Hill enlisted from Biddeford, and d. at Buxton Mar. 10, 1835. His widow 
Phebe survived him. 

26 Edward Hilton enlisted from Wells, and d. there April 26, 1833. His widow Mary 
was living there in 1835. 

y Samuel Hodsdon enlisted from Berwick, and d. at South Berwick Aug. 2, 1825. 
His widow Ann was living there ten years later. 



112 Revolutionary Soldiers of York County, Me. [April 

phia, daughter, aged 38; Sally, daughter, aged 14; Mary, daughter, 
aged 7. (356) ' 

David Horsom, 28 aged 62, of Berwick, July 4, 1820. Private in Capt. 
David Place's Co., Col. Read's Regt., Newhampshire line. Original 
declaration made Apr. 4, 1818. Pension No. 8,394. Reversed. Family: 
Lydia, wife, aged 59 ; Lucre tia, aged 19 ; David, aged 13 ; Lydia Grant, 
aged 7. (357) 

Jacob Horsum, aged 84, of Shapleigh, July 18, 1820. Private in Capt. 
Brewster's Co., Col. Peirce Long's Regt., Newhampshire line. Original 
declaration made Apr. 29, 1818. Pension No. 11,392. Affirmed. Family: 
Hannah, wife, aged 75. (358) 

Daniel Hubbard, aged 67, of Shapleigh, July 18, 1820. Private in 
Capt. Jonathan Nowell's Co., Col. Prescott's Regt., Mass. line. Original 
declaration made Apr. 9, 1818. Pension No. 10,342. Affirmed. Family: 
Lucy, wife, aged 64. (359) 

John Huston, 29 Jun r ., aged 57, of Sanford, July 18, 1820. Private in 
Capt. John Haskell's Co., Col. William Shepard's Regt., Mass. line. 
Original declaration made April 8, 1818. Pension No. 7,712. Affirmed. 
Family : Sarah, wife, aged 47 ; children, Lydia, aged 23 ; John, aged 
1 9 ; Samuel, aged 1 4 ; Sarah, aged 1 1 ; Perses, aged 8 ; Enoch, aged 
6 ; Adam, aged 3 ; Hiram, aged 1. (360) 

Enoch Hutchings, aged 62, of York, July 4, 1820. Private in Capt. 
Samuel Derby's Co., Col. James Prescott's Regt., Mass. line. Original 
declaration made Apr. 13, 1818. Pension No. 8,385. Affirmed. Family: 
Polly Hutchings, wife, aged 58. (363) 

Levi Hutchings, 80 aged 72, of Alfred, July 18, 1820. Private in Capt. 
Daniel Merrill's Co., Col. Samuel Brewer's Regt., Mass. line. Original 
declaration made Apr. 8, 1818. Pension No. 5,899. Affirmed. Family: 
Olive Hutchings, wife, aged 66 ; Thankful Hutchings, daughter, aged 
36; Almira Paul, granddaughter, aged 13. (362) 

Eastman Hutchins, 31 aged 68, of Alfred, July 19, 1820. Serjeant in 
Capt. Silas Wild's Co., Col. Edmund Phinney's Regt., Mass. line. Origi- 
nal declaration made Oct. 29, 1818. Pension No. 10,521. Reversed. 
Family : Betsy Hutchings, aged 52 ; Sarah Hutchings, mother, aged 87. 
(361) 

Simeon Hutchins, 82 aged 67, of Arundel, July 18, 1820. Private in 
Capt. Daniel Merrill's Co., Col. Samuel Brewer's Regt., Mass. line. 
Original declaration made Apr. 8, 1818. Pension No. 5,935. Affirmed. 
Family : Wife [name and age not given] ; Asa Hutchins, aged 25 ; Fan- 
ny Hutchins, aged 18. (364) 

Richard Ingerson, aged 69, of Kittery, July 4, 1820. Private in Capt 
Titus Salter's, afterwards Capt. Elisha Shapleigh's Co., Col. Storer's 
Regt., Newhampshire line. Original declaration made Apr. 13, 1818. 
Pension No. 10,244. Affirmed. No family. (365) 

Eli Jackson, aged 61, of Limington, July 18, 1820. Private in Capt. 
Thomas Remick's Co., Col. Joseph Vose's Regt., Mass. line. Original 
declaration made Apr. 28, 1818. Pension No. 12,847. Affirmed. Family: 

88 David Horsom enlisted from Berwick, and was living there in 1835. 

29 John Huston enlisted from Wells, and was living at Sanford in 1835. 

30 Levi Hutchins enlisted at Alfred, and was living there in 1835. 

31 Eastman Hutchings enlisted from Arundel, and d. at Alfred May 8, 1826. His 
widow Betsey was living there in 1835. 

32 Simeon Hutchins enlisted from Arundel, and was living at Kennebunk in 1835. 



1911] Revolutionary Soldiers of York County, Me. 113 

Hannah, wife, aged 57 ; Daniel Jackson, aged 18 ; Betsy Jackson, aged 
14; Abel Jackson, aged 11 ; Catharine Jackson, aged 9. (366) 

George Jacobs, 33 aged 69, of Sanford, July 4, 1820. Lieutenant in 
Capt. Jere Hill's Co., Mass. line. Original declaration made Apr. 8, 
1818. Pension No. 5,909. Affirmed. Family. Wife, aged 63; "no 
children with me." (367) 

John Jewell, aged 58, of Cornish, July 4, 1820. Private in Capt. Cher- 
ry's Co., Col. Reed's Regt., Newhampshire line. Original declaration 
made Apr. 18, 1818. Pension No. 3,244. Affirmed. Family: Molly 
Jewell, aged 46 ; Charlotte, aged 26 ; David, aged 9 ; Abigail, aged 5. 
(368) 

Dennis Johnson, 84 aged 65, of Waterborough, July 20, 1820. Private 
in Capt. Joshua Benson's Co., Col. Joseph Vose's Regt., Mass. line. 
Original declaration made May 18, 1818. Pension No. 17,339. Af- 
firmed. Family : Wife Mary, aged 62 ; Children : Noah, aged 20 ; Mary, 
aged 22. (369) 

John Junkins, aged 62, of York, July 4, 1820. Seaman on board U. S. 
ship Ranger, commanded by Capt. Thomas Simpson. Newhampshire 
line. Original declaration made April 13, 1818. Pension No. 12,641. 
Affirmed. Family : Hannah Junkins, wife, aged 55 ; Hannah Junkins, 
aged 16; Eunice Junkins, aged 13. (370) 

Abraham Kimball, aged 64, of Lyman, July 18, 1820. Private in Capt. 
Samuel Sayer's Co., Col. John Patterson's Regt., Mass. line. Original 
declaration made Apr. 8, 1818. Pension No. 10,345. Affirmed. Family: 
Phebe, daughter, aged 24 ; Electa, aged 16 ; Sally, aged 14. (371) 

Benjamin Kimball, aged 67, of Wells, July 4, 1820. Private in Capt. 
Samuel Sayer's Co., Col. Patterson's Regt., Mass. line. Original decla- 
ration made Apr. 8, 1818. Pension No. 12,643. Reversed. No family. 
(372) 

Hezediah Kimball, aged 71, of Arundel, July 18, 1820. In Capt. 
Samuel Sayer's Co., Col. Nathaniel Scamman's Regt., Mass. line. Orig- 
inal declaration made Apr. 9, 1818. Pension No. 8,533. Affirmed. 
Family : Mary Kimball, aged 65. (373) 

Nathan Kimball, 35 aged 70, of York, July 4, 1820. Corporal in Capt. 
Danl. Wheelwright's Co., Col. B. Tupper's Regt., Mass. line. Original 
declaration made Apr. 8, 1818. Pension No. 5,911. Affirmed. Family: 
Lvdia, wife, aged 65 ; Betsy, daughter, aged 37 ; Lydia, daughter, aged 
34. (374) 

John Kingsbury, aged 67, of York, July 5, 1820. In Capt. Newell's 
Co., Col. William Prescott's Regt., Mass. line. Original declaration 
made May 9, 1818. Pension No. 8,586. Reversed. Family : Betsy, 
wife, aged 46; Mary, daughter, aged 22 ; John, son, aged 17 ; Timothy, 
son, aged 15; Alzira, daughter, aged 12; Benjamin, aged 10; Sarah, 
aged 6 ; Lydia Frost, aged 34. (375) 

Jonathan Knight, 86 aged 58, of Waterborough, July 18, 1820. Private 
in Capt. John Hobby's Co., Col. Jackson's or Col. Hull's Regt., Mass. 
line. Original declaration made April 13, 1818. Pension No. 5,496. 
Reversed. Family: Abia, wife, aged 5Q ; Dorcas Knight, aged 31; 

33 Lieut. George Jacobs enlisted from Wells, and d. at Sanford June 1, 1831. His 
widow Hephsibeth was living there in 1835. 

^Dennis Johnson enlisted from Kittery, and was living at Waterborough in 1835. 

35 Nathan Kimball enlisted from Wells, and d. at York Oct. 15, 1827. His widow 
Lydia was living at South Berwick in 1835. 

36 Jonathan Knight enlisted from Berwick, and was living at Waterborough in 1835. 



114 Revolutionary Soldiers of York County, Me. [April 

Simeon Knight and his wife Peggy Knight, aged 29 ; Stephen Knight, 
as;ed 20 ; Olive Knight, aged 18 ; Polly Knight, aged 16 ; Betsy Knight, 
aged 14. (376) 

Joskph Knight, 87 aged 65, of Alfred, July 18, 1820. Private in Capt. 
Pettingal's Co., Col. Baldwin's Regt., Mass. line. Original declaration 
made Apr. 8, 1818. Pension No. 11,377. Affirmed. Family. Han- 
nah, aged 68. (377) 

Abraham Knowlton, aged 65, of Berwick, July 4, 1820. Private in 
Capt. Ezra Lunt's Co., Col. Moses Little's Regt., Mass. line. Original 
declaration made Apr. 8, 1818. Pension No. 7,437. Affirmed. No 
family. 

David Knox, aged 58, of Lebanon, July 4, 1820. Private in Capt. John 
Allen's Co , Col. Vose's Regt., Mass. line. Original declaration made 
Apr. 7, 1818. Pension No. 7,738. Reversed. Family : Molly, wife, 
aged 58 ; Jerusha, aged 21 ; Molly, aged 18 ; Lydia, aged 16 ; Leonard, 
aged 12; Mercy, aged 10. (379) 

John Knox, 38 aged 76, of Lebanon, July 18, 1820. Private in Capt. Samuel 
Derby's Co., Col. John Bailey's Regt., Mass. line. Original declaration 
made Apr. 7, 1818. Pension No. 11,570. Affirmed. Family: Molly, 
wife, aged 76. (380) 

Jabez Lane, aged 76, of Buxton, July 18, 1820. Captain in Capt. Jabez 
Lane's Co., Col. Thomas Nixon's Regt., Mass. line. Original declara- 
tion made Apr. 13, 1818. Pension No. 5,713. Affirmed. Family: 
Sarah Lane, aged 66; Sally Lane, aged 12. (381) 

Caleb Lassel, 39 aged 59, of Waterborough, July 18, 1820. Private in 
Capt. Daniel Merrill's Co., Col. Samuel Brewer's Regt., Mass. line. 
Original declaration made January 21, 1819. Pension No. 5,512. Af- 
firmed. Family : Dorcas Lassel, aged 60 ; Ruth Lassel, aged 26 ; Mary 
Lassel, aged 20. (382) 

Nathaniel Leavitt, aged 64, of Limerick, July 19, 1820. Lieutenant 
in Capts. David McGregory's & others' Co., Col. Alexander Scammell's 
Regt., Newhampshire line. Original declaration made Apr. 13, 1818. 
Pension No. 5,714. Received wound in the Battle at Bunker Hill. 
Family : Mary Leavitt, wife, aged 60 ; Loisa Adams, granddaughter, 
aged 17. (383) 

William Leavitt, 40 aged 68, of Alfred, July 18, 1820. Private in Capt. 
Caleb Robinson's Co., Cols. Hale's and Read's Regt., Newhampshire 
line. Original declaration made August 18, 1818. Pension No. 10,564. 
Reversed. Family : Abigail Leavitt, daughter, aged 28 ; William Leav- 
itt, Jr., son, aged 20 ; Hezekiah Scribner, grandchild, aged 5. (384) 

Nathaniel Libbey, 41 aged 57, of Limerick, July 19, 1820. Private in 
Capt. Nathaniel Cushing's Co., Col. Joseph Vose's Regt., Mass. line. 
Original declaration made May 10, 1818. Pension No. 10,563. Re- 
versed. Family: Miriam Libbey, aged 54; Sidney Libbey, aged 18; 
Helena Libbey, aged 15 ; Joseph Libbey, aged 12 ; Abigail Libbey, 
aged 6. (386) 

37 Joseph Knight enlisted from Berwick, and was living at Alfred in 1835. 

38 For John Knox's genealogy see my " Soldiers of the American Revolution of Leb- 
anon, Maine," p. 31. 

39 Caleb Lassell enlisted from Arundel, and was living at Waterborough in 1835. 

40 William Leavitt enlisted from Exeter, N. H., and d. at Alfred Oct. 22, 1837. His 
widow Betsey survived him. 

41 Nathaniel Libby enlisted from Kittery and was living in Limerick in 1835. 



1911] Revolutionary Soldiers of York County, Me. 115 

Samuel Libbey, aged 60, of Lebanon, July 4, 1820. Mariner in the Navy 
of the Revolution in the Ranger. Original declaration made May 1, 
1818. Pension No. 16,424. Affirmed. Family. Betsy, wife, aged 58; 
Thomas, son, aged 16 ; Charlotte, daughter, aged 14. (387) 

William Libbey, aged 70, of Newfield, July 19, 1820. In Capts. Tyler 
& Skillings's Co., Cols. Rhinney's & Francis's Regt., Mass. line. Orig- 
inal declaration made Apr. 20, 1818. Pension No. 5,717. Reversed. 
Family: Elizabeth Libbey, aged 66; Edward Libbey, aged 36. (388) 

Harvy Libby, 4 * 2 aged 50, of Limington, July 19, 1820. Private in Capt. 
Allen's Co., Col. Joseph Vose's Regt., Mass. line. Original declaration 
made Apr. 24. 1818. Pension No. 14,355. Reversed. Family: Sarah 
Libby, aged 50 ; Jacob S. Libby, aged 19 ; Anna Libby, aged 17 ; Dor- 
othy Libby, aged 15 ; Statira & Elmira Libby, aged 13 ; Robert Libby, 
aged 11 ; David Libby, aged 8; Stephen Libby, aged 5. (385) 

Thkodore Linscott, 43 aged 64, of Sanford, July 4, 1820. In Capt. Jere- 
miah Hill's Co., Col. Joseph Vose's Regt., Mass. line. Original decla- 
ration made Apr. 11, 1818. Pension No. 5,720. Affirmed. Family: 
Dorcas, wife, aged 62 ; Mary, daughter, aged 20. (389) 

Abraham Littlefield, 44 aged 57, of York, July 4, 1820. Private in 
Capt. Henry Sewall's Co., Col. Ebenezer Sprout's Regt., Mass. line. 
Original declaration made Apr. 13, 1818. Pension No. 11,578. Af- 
firmed. Family : Susanna Littlefield, aged 54 ; Sally Littlefield, aged 
16 ; James Littlefield, aged 17. (390) 

Joel Littlefield, aged 58, of Lyman, July 4, 1820. Private in Capt. 
Moore's Co. of artillery, in Regt. commanded by Col. stationed at 
Falmouth, now Portland, Maine. Affirmed. Family : Wife, aged 52 ; 
Children: Abigail, aged 24; Betsy, aged 22 ; Charlotte, aged 17. (391) 
. Jotham Littlefield, aged 73, of Wells, July 4, 1820. Private in Capt. 
Daniel Wheelwright's Co., Col. Francis's Regt., Mass. line. Original 
declaration made April 8, 1818. Pension No. 5,938. Affirmed. Family : 
Dorcas Littlefield, aged 55 ; Mary Littlefield, aged 44 ; Miriam Gard- 
ner, widowed daughter, aged 50. (392) 

Johnson Littlefield, aged 60, of Wells, July 4, 1820. Private in 
Capt. Abner Wade's Co., Col. Jackson's Regt., Mass. line. Original 
declaration made Apr. 8, 1818. Pension No. 7,714. Reversed. Family: 
Susanna, mother, aged 92 ; Sarah, wife, aged 53 ; Anna, daughter, aged 
27; Aaron, son, aged 14 ; Benaiah, son, aged 11. (393) 

Noah M. Littlefield, aged 83, of Wells, July 4, 1820. Lieutenant in 
Col. Francis's and afterwards Col. Tupper's Regt., Mass. line. Original 
declaration made Apr. 8, 1818. Pension No. 5,897. Affirmed. No 
family. 

Daniel Lord, 2nd, 45 aged 68, of Limerick, July 18, 1820. Private in 
Capts. S. Leighton's & Silas Wise's Co., Cols. .James Seamman's & Phin- 
ney's Regt., Mass line. Original declaration made July 29, 1819. Pen- 
sion No. 13,129. Affirmed. Family: Hannah Lord, wife, aged 59; 
Surali Lord, aged 34; Hannah Lord, aged 24; Luke Lord, aged 22; 
William Lord, aged 20; Letsy Lord, aged 17. (395) 

•Harvey Libby enlisted from Scarborough, and was living in Limington in 1835. 

43 Theodore Linscott enlisted from York, and was living at Sanford in 1836. 

44 Abraham Littlefield enlisted from Wells, and d. at York, July 20, 1831. His widow 
Snsanna was living there in 1836. 

45 Daniel Lord enlisted from Berwick, and d. at Limerick, Dec. 15, 1833. His widow 
Hannah was living there in 1835. 

[To be continued] 



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1911] James Brown of Middletown, Conn. 133 



JAMES BKOWN OF MIDDLETOWN, CONN. 

By Edwin A. Hill, Ph.D., of Washington, D. C. 
[Concluded from page 10] 

12. Mary 8 Ann Brown (Hugh, 2 James 1 ) , born 1 Nov. 1780, died 3 Dec. 
1855. She married, 2 Jan. 1801, Julius Hill, born 29 Nov. 
1774-5, died 10 Dec. 1852, son of Reuben and Hannah (Scranton) 
of Madison, Conn. He was by trade a pump and block maker, a 
contractor for U. S. naval equipment, and served in the Coast 
Guard as quartermaster at Madison during the War of 1812. Mr. 
and Mrs. Hill are buried in the Madison Cemetery. 
Children : 

i. Orra Collins Hill, b. 1 Sept. 1802; d. unm. 11 Mar. 1822. 

ii. Horatio Nelson Hill, b. 28 Dec. 1803; d. unm. 20 Dec. 1894. 

iii. Wealthy Ann Hill, b. 18 Nov. 1805 ; d. unm. 16 Oct. 1822. 

iv. Julius Augustus Hill, b. 31 Aug. 1807; d. 13 Nov. 1836; m. 1835, 
Henrietta Hand Crampton, b. 1 Oct. 1813, dau. of Jesse and 
Kuth (Bradley) of Madison, who m. (2) in 1860 Samuel Griswold 
of Madison. Child, Walter Scott Hill, b. 23 Dec. 1835; m. (1) 
Josephine Griswold ; m. (2) Helena Oscar ; resided in New York 
City ; child by first wife : Ida W. M., m. Franklin Parker, and has 
issue ; children by second wife : Arthur G. and Albert E. 

v. Benjamin Sage Hill, b. 24 Oct. 1809 ; d. 11 Mar. 1812. 

vi. Samuel Brown Hill, b. 20 Sept. 1811; d. 17 Jan. 1895; m. (1) 15 
Aug. 1838, Orphana Kelsey, who d. 2 Oct. 1840, dau. of Edward; 
m. (2) Caroline E. Scranton, b. 19 Feb. 1820, d. 2 Jan. 1892, 
dau. of Theophilus and Elizabeth (Warner) ; resided at Madison, 
Conn. Child by first wife : 1. Orphana Kelsey, b. 8 May 1840 ; 
m. 15 June 1859, Joseph A. Leete, b. 19 Aug. 1836; resided at 
Guilford, Conn. ; children : Elizabeth H. and Clara I. Children 
by second wife: 2. Charles Scranton, b. 21 May 1846; d. 8 May 
1879 ; m. 21 June 1871, Margaret A. Le Bar, b. 19 Feb. 1844 ; re- 
sided at Shawnee, Pa. ; child, Anna C. 3. Selden Brown, b. 21 
May 1848; m. 5 Nov. 1881, Emma J. Winkley, b. 16 July 1859, 
dau. of Joseph B. ; resided in New York City ; child, Benjamin W. 

4. William Sage, b. 8 Apr. 1854; m. 16 Nov. 1867, Harriet J. 
Griswold ; resides at Madison, Conn. ; child, Charles Humphrey. 

5. Sarah Jane, b. 8 Apr. 1854 ; d. unm. 19 Oct. 1872. 6. Edward #., 
b. 22 June 1857. 

vii. Sidney Sage Hill, b. 14 Sept. 1813 ) d. at Greenwich, N. Y., 9 Sept. 
1881; m. 9 Jan. 1840, Julia R. Ames, b. 27 Feb. 1817, d. 18 Jan. 
1868, dau. of William and Lovina (Hines) of Dorset, Vt. ; resided 
for many years at Factory Point and, later, Rutland, Vt. Chil- 
dren : 1. William Ames, b. 14 Mar. 1845 ; m. 13 Oct. 1864, Sarah 
. E. Davis, b. 12 Feb. 1844, dau. of Leonard and Catherine ii. ; no 
issue. 2. Mary Lovina, b. 8 May 1851 ; d. 6 Sept. 1852. 3. Charles 
Julius, b. 20 May 1856 ; m. 16 June 1888, Alice Marks, b. 10 July 
1855, dau. of George and Mary A. (Skudder) of London, Eng., 
resides in New York City; no issue. 

viii. Benjamix Scranton Hill, b. 16 Aug. 1815; d. 18 Jan. 1895; m. 26 
Mar. 1846, Elizabeth S. Jones, b. 15 May 1824, d. 20 Aug. 1905, 
dau. of Joseph B. and Eliza (Stokes) ; resided in New York City. 
Children: 1. Ella Virginia,^. 6 Feb. 1847; d. unm. 21 May 1864. 
2. Edwin Allston (the writer;, b. 18 Jan. 1850; m. 18 June 1884, 
Ida M. Wood, b. 5 Nov. 1854, dau. of Alonzo and Rachel (Hodges) 
of West Haven, Conn. ; one child, Rachel E., b. 30 Sept., d. 17 Oct., 
1885. 



134 James Brown of Middletown, Conn. [April 

lx. Frederick William Hill, b. 17 Sept. 1817; m. Sarah C. Field, 
b. 14 Sept. 1821, dau. of Jedediah and Rebecca (Bradley) of Guil- 
ford, Conn. ; reside at New Haven, Conn. Children : 1. Mary 
Mien, b. 27 June 1845; d. 28 Nov. 1857. 2. Emma Virginia, b. 13 
Sept. 1854 ; m. George Hemingway, since deceased, son of Leverett 
A. and Frances A. (Tyler) of New Haven; no issue. 

13. Clarissa 3 Brown (Hugh, 2 James 1 ), born 28 May 1783, died 7 Nov. 

1860. She married Oliver Hull, born 9 May 1775, died 30 
April 1842, son of Oliver and Martha (Buell). They resided at 
Clinton, Conn. 
Children : 

i. Oliver Brown Hull, b. 7 Jan. 1807 ; d. 16 Mar. 1888 ; m. 22 Oct. 
1838, Phebe M. Carter; for many years judge of probate at 
Clinton. Children: 1. Charles Edward, h. 1 Apr. 1841. 2. Jen- 
nette Elizabeth, b. 12 Feb. 1844 ; d. 21 Nov. 1846. 3. George Oliver, 
b. 22 July 1847. 4. Henry Carter, b. 12 Dec. 1849 ; m. 7 Mar. 1876, 
Arabelle A. Meigs, b. 15 Feb. 1856, dau. of James R. and Eliza A. ; 
reside at Clinton. 5. Nelson Graves, b. 25 Apr. 1852 ; d. 29 Jan. 
1880. 

ii. Austin Hull, b. 14 Jan. 1809; m. 6 Oct. 1833, Lucy Ann Leete, 
b. 16 Oct. 1814, d. 18 Feb. 1886, dau. of Absalom and Sally (Pease) ; 
resides at Clinton, Children: 1. Andrew Wesley, b. 3 Feb. 
1835 ; d. 19 Nov. 1878 ; m. Abbie Ludington of Fair Haven, Conn. ; 
several children. 2. Sarah Elizabeth, b. 28 Aug. 1836; m. 25 May 
1858, William Walker of New Haven, Conn., who d. 25 Oct. 1887; 
several children, of whom Clara Louise Walker m. 20 Oct. 1887, 
Wyllys Van Valkenburg. 3. Elizabeth Maronette Pease, b. 18 Feb. 
1840; m. 29 May 1869, Henry Lines; one or more children. 4. 
Ellen Brovm, b. 17 May 1842 ; m. John N. Bartholomew, and had 
Carrie Estella, William N., Annice Estella, and others (see Bar- 
tholomew Genealogy, No. 505, p. 408). 

iii. Henry Hull, b. 21 Mar. 1812; d. 21 June 1845; m. 16 July 1838, 
Mary T. Howard of Madison, N. Y. Children : 1. Henry Leslie. 
2. Mary Howard. 

iv. Clarissa A. Hull, b. 1 June 1814; m. 24 Nov. 1851, Huntington 
Willcox ; one child, Ida May. 

v. Mary E. Hull, b. 26 May 1817; d. 14 Jan. 1888; m. 11 Apr. 1838, 
Nathan Kelsey. Children: 1. John Henry. 2. George S. 3. 
Andrew J. 4. Oliver H. 5. Edwin. 6. A daughter. 

vi. Martha A. Hull, b. 19 June 1826; m. 9 Feb. 1852, Edward Good- 
rich of Glastonbury, Conn. Children: 1. Edward Oliver of An- 
sonia, Conn. 2. Alice G. 3. Frank — the last two perhaps by a 
second husband. 

14. Martha 3 Brown (Hugh, 2 James 1 ), born 26 Oct. 1785, died 1 Oct. 

1825. She married, 18 Dec. 1802, Josiah Deming of New Haven, 
Conn., born 21 Aug. 1775, died 4 Apr. 1852, son of Josiah Treat and 
Lois (Scran ton) of Guilford, Conn. They moved to Batavia, N. Y., 
and Greencastle, Ind., where he died and was buried. 
Children : 

i. Harriet Deming, b. 27 Dec. 1803 ; d. 1875 ; m. James Cochran of 
New Haven, who d. at Bloomington, Ind., 1853 (or 1851) . Children : 
1. Harriet Cornelia, b. 1824; m. 1858, Clement Whittaker; moved 
to Bloomington, Ind., and had Clement, Harriet, Mortimer, Clar- 
ence, and another. 2. John Owens, b. 1826; d. 26 Aug. 1842. 3. 
Helen Maria, b. 1828; m. James Mahappy ; d. at Newton, 111., 
1861 ; one child, d. young. 4. Leverett Franklin, b. 1830; m. Clar- 
issa E. Black ; resided at Bloomington, Ind. ; children : Walter, 
Nora, Frederick. 5. Josephine iSibyl, b. 1832 ; d. 1834. 

ii. Grace Ann Deming, b. 4 Oct. 1806; m. Hezekiah D. Platt of 
Niagara, Ontario, where he d. in 1878. Children: 1. Willard, 



1911] James Brown of Middletovm, Conn. 135 

b. 1830 ; resided at Niagara. 2. Wealthy Jane, b. 1839 ; ra. William 
Gordon of Indianapolis, Ind. ; child, Martha Ann, b. 1878. 3. 
Harriet Piatt, b. 1842 ; m. 1862, L. P. Culloden of Ontario; moved 
to Indianapolis ; children: Lawrence P., b. 1863, Grace Louisa, 
b. 1865, Frederick, b. 1867, d. 1879, William Gordon, b. 1869. 

iii. Frederick Deming, b. 12 Oct. 1808; m. 24 Dec. 1844, Margaret 
Benham, b. 3 July 1828, dau. of William and Elizabeth (Plummer) ; 
lived at Batavia, N. Y., Bloomington, Ind., and Latona, 111. Chil- 
dren : 1. Elizabeth, b. 29 Aug. 1847; m. in 1878, John Howard, 
and had Harriet G., Oliver B., Bertha D., and Emery. 2. Martha, 
b. 13 Mar. 1849; m. 1868, James S. Long, b. 1849, and had Wil- 
liam H., George E., Albert F., Eli L., Luther E., Aden F., Bertha 
C, and Evart H. 3. Rebecca A., b. 23 Oct. 1852 ; m. 1878, George 
W. Lewis, b. 1845, and had Mary E. and Minnie O. 4. Albert, 
b. 12 Mar. 1851 ; residing in Portland, Ore., in 1881. 5. George W., 
b. 16 Feb. 1857. 6. Mary Ann, b. 29 May 1859; m. 1885, John 
Bragg, b. 1854. 7. Leverett F.,h. 1861; d. 1863. 8. Cornelius B., 
b. 1*63; d. 1870. 9. Harriet, b. 13 Jan. 1867; m. 1885, Ervin 
Whitsel, b. 1862. 

iv. Adaline Deming, b. 18 Sept. 1810; m. 1832, Alonzo Beeman, b. at 
Vergennes, Vt., 15 June 1800, d. at Aiken, Tex., 31 Dec. 1867; re- 
sided at Bloomington, Ind., Springfield, 111., etc. Children: 1. 
Julia Mary, b. 23 June 1833; d. 19 Sept. 1834. 2. Cora Elizabeth, 
b. 2 Oct. 1835 ; m. 1860, Rev. Josiah Phillips ; resided at Stephens- 
vllle, Tex., and had Valeria P., Rienzi, Willard L., Ethel, Blanche, 
Robert, and William M. 3. Harriet Emeline, b. 20 Nov. 1837; 
d. 1874; m. (1) 1855, N. S. White Of Bill Co., Tex., who d. in 
battle; m. (2) N. J. Franklin; children by first husband : Robert 
A. and Cora; children by second husband: Edward F., Willard, 
and Coke. 4. Binaldo Rinaldini, b. 19 Sept. 1840 ; m. Kate Baker, 
and in 1881 was living at Amity, Ark., having had Maud B., 
Leroy E., and several others. 5. Mary Ann, b. 25 Dec. 1842 ; m. 
James I. Franklin; resided at Aiken, Tex., in 1880, and later at 
Comanche, Tex., having had Emmet F., Sarah, Mary A., Fanny A., 
Irene, Lola, and James. 6. Geraldo Alonzo, b. 11 Aug. 1845; m. 
1867, Cornelia Rupe ; served in the Confederate army ; living in 
1887 at Comanche, Tex., having had Clara B., Geraldo, and Lilla. 
7. Alberta, b. 11 Mar. 1848; m. (1) 10 Sept. 1870, Prof. James B. 
Allen; living in 1886 at Eureka Springs, Ark. ; one child, Beemie 

A.; m. (2) McLane. 8. Sarah Alice, b. 30 Apr. 1850; m. 

4 July 1872, Hon. Lyman B. Russell, b. 16 Sept. 1850, son of 
Charles O. and Emeline P. (Brightman) ; resides at Comanche, Tex. ; 
had Charles E., Lyman B., George B., Frederick D., Oscar A., and 
Edward A. 

v. Josiah Deming, b. 3 Dec. 1812 ; d. 6 Dec. 1812. 

vi. Mary Ann Deming, b. 13 Mar. 1814; m. (1) 18 May 1832, 

Avis, who d. 1838; m. (2) in 1845, Dr. John Hill, a soldier of 
the War of 1812, who d. Oct. 1863, aged 80; lived at Urbana and 
Carrollton, Ohio. Children by first husband: 1. Jeanette. 2. 
Frederick A. 3. Eliza. Children by second husband : 4. Mary, 
b. 1845 ; d. 1849. 5. John, b. 1 Feb. 1847 ; d. aged l£ vrs. 6. Ada, 
b. 28 June 1849; m. 25 Mar. 1876, Charles Shields; lived at Ken- 
ton, Ohio, and had dau. Rosetta. 7. Lauretta, b. 22 Jan. 1852; 
m. 19 Nov. 1874, Francis Sterling of Carrollton, Ohio, b. 24 June 
1850, and had Sterling, Dwight, and Ada. 8. Willard Piatt, b. 27 
Nov. 1856; m. 23 Sept. 1874, Kate M. Coleman; lived in Canton, 
Ohio, and had Ethel, John, and Luly. 

vii. Elizabeth Deming, b. 12 Sept. 1816; m. 13 Apr. 1846, Jeremiah 
Young, who d. at Colorado Springs 5 June 1878. Children: 1. 
Cornelia Henrietta, b. 8 May 1847. 2. George Mortimer, b. 2 Nov. 

1848 ; m. Timm of Denver, Col. ; resides at Colorado 

Springs, having had one daughter. 3. James Henry, b. 14 Aug. 

1850; m. Neale; resides in Alameda, Cal., and has had two 

children. 4. Rosalie Lucena, b. 26 Sept. 1852; d. 15 Dec. 1860. 

viii. Josiah Deming. 
vol. lxv. 10 



136 James Brown of Middletown, Conn, [April 

ix. Sarah Gilbert Deming, b. 20 Nov. 1818; d. July 1820. 

x. Franklin Deming, b. 6 Nov. 1820 ; m. Dunham of Bloom- 

ington, Ind., where he died. Children: 1. Henry. 2. George. 

3. Elias, d. young. 
xi. Emeline Deming, b. 26 Jan. 1823 ; m. 21 Feb. 1847, Joseph A. Hill, 

son of John and Mary (Vince), b. 1827 ; lived at Greencastle, Ind. 

Children: 1. Joseph, b. 25 Dec. 1847. 2. Mary Pauline, b. 1 Apr. 

1850 ; m. John Paris, and had Ida, Mary, Leonard, and Benton. 

3. Helen Jenette, b. 24 June 1854. 4. Harriet Grace, b. 2 June 

1859. 5. Jerome, b. 1859. 6. Edwin Clement, b. 30 June 1862. 

15. Nathaniel 3 Brown (Nathaniel? James 1 ), born 26 Aug. 1756, mar- 

ried, 5 Aug. 1782, , and died 9 Oct. 1800, having resided at 

Newbern, N. C. 
Children : 

i. Molly, bapt. 28 Sept. 1783. 

ii. Elisha, bapt. 4 June 1786. 

iii. Parsons Hubbard, bapt. 31 May 1798. 

16. Sarah 3 Brown (Nathaniel? James 1 ), born 21 July 1765, married, 

14 Feb. 1788, Gideon Mallory, born 21 June 1765, son of Gideon 
and Olive (Woodbury). They lived at Middlebury, Vt., and Kings- 
ton, Ontario. 
Children : 

i. Emeline Mallory, bapt. 15 Feb. 1789. 

ii. Caroline Mallory, bapt. 29 Feb. 1792 ; d. young. 

iii. Brown Mallory. 

iv. Burr Mallory ; d. young. 

17. Esther 3 Brown (Nathaniel? James 1 ), born 7 Sept. 1767, married, 

26 Nov. 1789, Thomas Green of New Haven, Conn., a printer, 
and died there 2 May 1809. 
Children : 

i. A DAUGHTER. 

ii. Samuel Green; m. and left a son. 
iii. Albert Green. 

18. Hannah 3 Brown (Nathaniel? James 1 ), born 31 Dec. 1771, married, 

12 Sept. 1796, Dr. Isaac Smith, 3d, of Chatham, Conn., born 
at Chatham 11 Oct. 1772, died there 19 Dec. 1839, son of Dea. 
Isaac and Jerusha (Brooks). She died at Chatham 19 July 1846. 
Children : 

i. Lydia Huntington Smith, b. 6 Nov. 1797 ; d. 30 July 1805. 

ii. George Bkown Smith, b. 27 Jan. 1801 ; d. at Chatham 20 June 1833 ; 
m. 27 Aug. 1821, Ann Pluymert, who d. 4 Feb. 1844, aged 44. 
Children : 1. Amelia Ann, b. 13 July 1822 ; d. Sept. 1823. 2. Fred- 
erick Ransom, b. 10 Dec. 1824; lost at sea in 1845. 3. Lucy Ann, 
b. 9 July 1827. 4. Amelia W., b. 6 Mar. 1829; m. at Hartford, 
Conn., 18 Dec. 1850, James H. Heroy, son of Leonius Clarkson and 
Martha (Brewster) ; reside at Troy, N. Y. ; children : William W., 
Annie P., Lucy E., Louise C, Amelia J., and Alice C. 5. George 
Isaac, b. 11 Nov. 1830; killed in battle near Mechanicsville, Va., 
31 May 1864. 6. Mary Ellen, b. 4 Jan. 1832 ; d. in New York City 
15 Nov. 1860; m. at Hartford, 19 Oct. 1853, John F. Bunce, b. I 
July 1802, son of John L. and Louise (Gookins) ; d. 10 Apr. 1878 ; 
children : Mary E. and Frederick S. 

iii. Mary Brooks Smith, b. 3 Mar. 1805; d. at Hartford 11 Feb. 1886; 
m. at Chatham, Conn., 8 Dec. 1825, William Bliss, son of Samuel 
of Hebron, Conn. ; child, William Bliss, b. 1827; m. 29 Oct. 1861, 
Emeline C. Cotton, and had Mary L. and George C. ; resides at 
Hartford. 



1911] James Brown of Middletown, Conn. 137 

19. Lucy 8 Brown (Nathaniel, 2 James 1 ), born 6 May 1776, died 8 July 

1827. She married, 15 Apr. 1794, Joel Hall, son of Joel and 

Hannah (Ranney), born 10 Jan. 1776, died 14 Sept. 1845. They 

resided at Portland, Conn. 

Children : 

i. Laura Hall, b. 9 Mar. 1795; m. (1) Aug. 1815, James Hodge, and 
had Charles, Lucy, Caroline, and James; m. (2) 8 Jan. 1832, Wal- 
ter Cheney of Hartford, and had two children, 
ii. Emily Green Hall, b. 3 June 1797 ; m. 30 June 1817, Henry Ufford 
Churchill, b. 30 June 1797, d. 30 Mar. 1868, son of David and 
Jerusha (Ufford). Children: 1. Jerusha Ufford, b. 1 Apr. 1818; 
m. 27 Oct. 1846, Alfred Hubert Allen, b. 19 Mar. 1818, son of 
Abel and Sarah (Hubert); children: David C, b. 8 Nov. 1847, 
Joel H., b. 1 Sept. 1849, Alfred, b. 1 Jan. 1852, and George C, 
b. 1 July 1856, d. 10 Dec. 1859. 2. Emily Hall, b. 25 Dec. 1819 ; 
m. Erastus Brainerd, Jr., b. 27 July 1819, son of Erastus and Mary 
(Stancliffe) ; child, Emily Churchill. 3. Mary Brown, b. 24 
Jan. 1822; d. June 27, 1854; m. (1) at Portland, Conn., 14 Eeb. 
1842, Nathan Denison Morgan, b. 22 Oct. 1818, d. at Cazenovia, 
N. Y., 20 Sept. 1895, son of Avery and Jerusha (Gardner) ; chil- 
dren: Henry C, b. 30 Dec. 1842, Matilda C, b. 7 July 1844, Wil- 
liam G., b. 23 Dec. 1846, Georgiana, b. 10 Sept. 1848, Mary J., b. 17 
Nov. 1850, d. 24 July 1851, James H., b. 31 Jan. 1853, and Mary E., 
b. 24 Apr. 1854, d. 4 July 1854. 4. Frances Matilda Gertrude, b. 12 
Oct. 1823. 5. David, b. 31 May 1826 ; d. 2 Dec. 1827. 6. Joel Hall, 
b. 5 Mar. 1828; d. 22 Sept. 1845. 7. Lucy Hall, b. 2 Nov. 1829. 
8. William Henry, b. 28 Nov. 1831 ; m. Jane Douglas Hebert, b. 10 
Oct. 1835, dau. of John and Elizabeth (Smith) of New York; 
children: Henry C, b. 19 Nov. 1853, John H., b. 24 Eeb. 1855, 
Richard G., b. 12 Apr. 1858, Mary E., b. 12 Jan. 1861, Wesley B., 
b. 12 Feb. 1873, and Helen E., b. 12 Eeb. 1873. 9. George Atwood, 
b. 22 Oct. 1833 ; d. 13 June 1856. 
iii. William Brown Hall, b. 22 Jan. 1800 ; d. 17 Oct. 1825 ; m. 27 May 

1818, Lucy S. Miles, dau. of Rev. Manoah Smith and Abigail, 
who m. (2) Elijah Gough. Children: 1. Mary Miles, b. 10 Mar. 

1819. 2. Emily, b. 14 Oct. 1821. 3. William Brown, bapt. 4 
Aug. 1829 ; d. young. 4. Henry. 

iv. Edward Hall, b. 21 Nov. 1803; m. (1) 24 Nov. 1829, Alpa Hamil- 
ton, b. 1804, d. 2 Apr. 1843; m. (2) Mrs. Charity (Cobb) Ham- 
ilton, w id. of Theodore. Children: 1. Alpa. 2. Lucy,m. Ed- 
ward Coe. 3. Maria, d. young. 4. Joel, resides at Hartford, 
Conn. 

v. Caroline Hall, b. 31 Dec. 1806 ; m. 12 Dec. 1827, David Anderson. 
Children: 1. Joel. 2. David. 3. Henry. 4. Edward, d. young. 
5. Jeanette. 6. William. 

vi. Nathaniel Brown Hall, b. 17 Aug. 1818 ; d. 9 Nov. 1882 ; m. 12 
Oct. 1841, Cynthia Southmayd, b. 21 Mar. 1817, dau. of Jona- 
than B. and Emily (Griffith). Children: 1. Wilton C, b. 2 Aug. 
1842. 2. Fredenck S., b. 1 July 1846; d. 22 Oct. 1847. 

20. Mary 4 Ann Brown ( William, 6 Samuel, 2 James 1 ), born at Guilford, 
Conn., 10 Feb. 1796, died at Hartford 3 May 1838. She married, 
in 1822, Rev. Horace Hooker, born at Berlin, Conn., 1794, died 
at Hartford 17 Dec. 1864, son of Elijah. She was a writer of 
some local reputation. Her husband married secondly, 22 Nov. 
1843, Harriet Watkinson, who died 6 Mar. 1884, daughter of 
Edward. 
Children : 

i. Thomas Hooker, b. 22 Oct. 1844; a lawyer; m. and living in New 

York City, 
ii. Mary Hooker, b. 24 Dec. 1846; m. Clarence L. Westcott, who 

d. 13 Jan. 1887. 



138 James Brown of Middletown, Conn. [April 

21. Clarissa 4 Brown ( William* Samuel, 2 James 1 ), born at Guilford, 

Conn., 6 Apr. 1798, died 16 Mar. 1866. She married at Hartford, 
23 Dec. 1829, Francis Parsons, born 16 Feb. 1795, died 9 Mar. 
1861, son of Rev. David and Harriet (Williams). They resided 
at Hartford. 
Children : 

i. John Cadwell Parsons, b. 3 June 1832; d. 11 Mar. 1898; m. at 
Montclair, N. J., 7 Apr. 1870, Mary McClellan, b. May 1844, 
d. 22 Jan. 1871, dau. of Dr. Samuel and Margaret (Ely). Child: 
Francis, b. 12 Jan. 1871 ; m. Elizabeth Alden Hutchins. 

ii. Mary Hooker Parsons, b. at Hartford 2 Feb. 1835 ; m. 6 June 1866, 
Watson Webb, b. 10 Nov. 1833, d. at Oakland, Cal., 3 Dec. 1876, 
son of Gen. James W. and Helen Lispenard (Stewart) of New 
York. Children: 1. Francis P., b. 26 Sept. 1868. 2. Helen L., b. 
25 Sept. 1870. 3. Elizabeth N., b. 19 Aug. 1877. 

iii. Jane Chester Parsons, b. 4 Oct. 1839 ; d. 9 Jan. 1843. 

iv. Elizabeth Scott Parsons, b. 14 June 1842 ; m. 16 Feb. 1864, John 
W. Newton, b. 27 Aug. 1836, son of Rev. Benjamin B. and Maria 
(Smith) of St. Albans, Vt. Child, Harriet W., b. 9 Nov. 1866. 

22. Wealthy 4 Frances Brown ( William* Samuel 2 James 1 ), born at 

Hartford 15 May 1800, died at Suffield, Conn., 24 Mar. 1833. She 
married, 11 June 1823, Rev. Henry Robinson, born 20 Dec. 
1788, died 14 Sept. 1878, son of Samuel and Content (Robinson) of 
Guilford, Conn. ; a Congregational minister at Litchfield, Suffield, 
Putnam, and Plainfield, Conn. He married secondly Mrs. Mary 
(Gay) Judd, by whom he had three children. 
Children : 

i. Mary Ann Robinson, b. 16 Apr. 1828 ; d. 26 Mar. 1831. 

ii. Margaret Elizabeth Robinson, b. 14 Aug. 1830; m. 20 June 1849, 
Peter Wallace Gallaudet, b. at Hartford 10 Mar. 1826, son 
of Ti^mas H. and Sophia (Fowler). Children: 1. Kate Eliza- 
beth, b. 27 Jan. ; d. 31 Aug. 1852. 2. Alice Isabel, b. 8 Sept. 1854. 
3. Thomas Hopkins, b. 23 Nov. 1857. 4. Fanny Marguerite, b. 15 
July 1869; d. 31 Aug. 1870. 

iii. Wealthy Frances Roblnson, b. 31 July 1832. 

iv. William Brown Robinson, b. 31 Dec. 1835; d. 3 Mar. 1851. 

23. Samuel 4 William Brown ( William,* Samuel, 2 James 1 ), born at 

Hartford 13 Apr. 1802, died at Petaluma, Cal., 30 Jan. 1862. He 
married at North Canton, Conn., 22 Mar. 1834, Hannah Humph- 
ries, born at Canton 25 May 1811, died at Guilford 12 Dec. 1900, 
daughter of Col. Decius and Laura (Adams). As a boy resided at 
Guilford, later at Hartford, was an M.D. at Yale in 1823, then 
lived at Collinsville, Conn., and finally moved to California in 1849. 
Children : 

i. Mason Cogswell, b. 31 Dec. 1834; d. 11 Sept. 1852. 

ii. Frances Rose, b. 10 Sept. 1837 ; d. 19 Mar. 1841. 

iii. Alfred Bishop, b. 26 Oct. 1841; d. at Muscatine, Iowa, 10 Mar. 

1897 ; m. 10 May 1876, Mrs. Mary Ellen (Groendyke) Dow, b. 

at Coldwater, Mich., 4 Oct. 1842, dau. of Asa and Louisa (Currier) 

Groendyke ; resided at Muscatine ; two children, 
iv. Mary Ann, b. 11 Jan. 1844 ; d. 4 Nov. 1852. 
v. Sarah, b. at Guilford, Conn., 27 Aug. 1846; m. there, 17 Nov. 1886, 

Henry Eliot Fowler, b. 13 Mar. 1848, son of Henry and Sally 

(Hart) ; resides at Guilford ; no issue. 



1911] First Ownership of Ohio Lands 139 



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1911] Lists of New England Soldiers 151 



BIBLIOGRAPHY OF LISTS OF NEW ENGLAND 

SOLDIERS 

By Mary Ellen Baker, B.A. 
[Concluded from page 19] 

RHODE ISLAND 

974.5 Narragansett historical register. Has lists. Not analyzed. 

N16 

351.2 Peirce, E. W. Pierce's colonial lists; civil, military, and pro- 

P35 fessional lists of Plymouth and R. I. colonies... 1621 — 1700. 

Bost., 1881 . Roster and rolls of Plymouth colony militia, p. 68—71. R. I. 
colony, 141—3. 

974.5 Rhode Islaild historical Society. Publications. 1893—1901. 

R341 8 Vols. Providence, [1893 — ] 1901. Military records from the ar- 

chives of the Dept. of State at Washington, D. C, vol.2, 1894, p. 180—8, 215—31. 

(1) REVOLUTION 

974.5 Arnold, S : G. History of the state of R. I. and Providence plan- 
Ar6 tations...l636 to 17.90. 2 vols. N. Y., 1860. Names of officers 

of certain revolutionary companies may be found in the footnotes of vol. 2, p. 
359—97. 

973 3445 Cowell, B: Spirit of 76 in Rhode Island; or, sketches of the 

C83 efforts of government and people in the war of the revolution... 

with the names of those who belonged to R. I. regiments in 

the army... Bost., 1850. Various lists, Indexed in Vital records of 
R. I., vol. 12, p. 92—298. 

973.3445 Field, E : Revolutionary defences in Rhode Island.. .with muster 
F45 rolls of the companies stationed along the shores of Narragan- 

sett Bay. Providence, 1896. 

973.3445 Murray. T : H. Irish Rhode Islanders in the American revo- 
M96 lution... Providence, 1903. Lists on p. 13—17, 61— 3. 

974.5 Rhode Island historical tracts. Vol. 1— date. Providence, 

R34 1877 — date. Returns and tables relating to the R. I. regiment in the revo- 

lution, of which the blacks formed a part, vol. 10, p. 77 — 83. 

(2) CIVIL WAR 

(a) General 

974.52 Greene, W. A. Providence plantations for 250 years... Provi- 

fG83 dence, 1886. Civil war roll of honor, p. 199— 200. 

353.97456 Rhode Island — Adjutant-General. Annual report...l862— 

A date. Providence, 1865 — date. Vol. for 1865 includes a register of 

the R. I. officers and soldiers who served in the rebellion. Not analyzed. 

973.76 Rhode Island— Soldiers' and Sailors' monument committee. 

R34 Proceedings at the dedication of the. ..monument in Providence 

to which is appended a list of the deceased soldiers and sailors 
whose names are sculptured upon the monument. Providence, 

1871. List, p. 47— 67. 

(b) Regimental 

973.7445 Denison, Frederic Sabres and spurs: the 1st regiment R. I. 
E01 cavalry in the civil war.. .with the roll of honor and roll of the 

regiment... [Central Falls, R. I.] 1876. Rolls, p. 475-597. 

VOL. LXV. 11 



152 Lists of New England Soldiers [April 

973.7445 History of the 7th squadron R. I. cavalry, by a member, 

E07a 18G2. Yarmouth, Me., 1879. Roll, p. 3-8. 

973.7445 DcniSOD, Frederic. Shot and shell: the 3d R. I. heavy artil- 

F03 lery regiment in the rebellion.. .also the roll of honor and roll of 

the regiment... Providence, 1879. Rolls, p. 334-62. 

973.7445 Btirlingainc, J: K. comp. History of the 5th regiment of 
F05 R. I. heavy artillery... in North Carolina, January, 1862 — June, 

1865. Providence, 1892. Roster, p. 263— 338. R. I. soldiers buried in 
the national cemetery, New Berne, N. C, p. 377. 

973.7445 Chrliery, W : H. (The) Fourteenth regiment R. I. heavy artil- 
F14 lery, colored... 18 61 — 65. Providence, 1898. Roster, p. 151—266. 

973.7445 Fcnner, Earl. History of battery H, 1st regiment R. I. light 
Gl artillery...l861 — 65. Providence, 1894. Roster, p. 159— 99. 

973.7445 ChaSC, P. 8. Battery F, 1st regiment R. I. light artillery in 
Gla the civil war, 1861 — 65. Providence, 1892. Roster, p. 249— 86. 

973.7445 Lewis, G : History of battery E, 1st regiment 'R. I. light ar- 
Glb tillery in the war of 1861 and 1865... Providence, 1892. Roster 

and battery index, p. 483—529. 

973.7445 Rhodes, J : H. History of battery B, 1st regiment R. I. ar- 
Glc tillery in. ..1861 — 65. Providence, 1894. Roster, p. 351— 77. 

973.7445 Aldrich, T : M. History of battery A, 1st regiment R. I. light 
Gld artillery in.. .1861 — Q5. Providence, 1904. Roster and special 

lists, p. 389—408. 

973.7445 Woodbury, Augustus, Narrative of the campaign of the 1st 
J01 R. I. regiment in 1861. Providence, 1862. Roil, p. 169— 223. 

973.7445 Woodbury, Augustus. (The) Second R. I. regiment... [in] the 
J02 war for the union. Providence, 1875. Roll, p. 429—618. 

973.7445 Allen, G : H. Forty-six months with the 4th R. I. volunteers 

J04 in.. .1861 — 65... Providence, 1887. Roster of Co. B, with recruits, 

&c, p. 371—86. 

973.7445 Hopkins, W : P. (The) Seventh regiment R. I. volunteers in 
J07 the civil war, ] 8 62 — 65. Providence, 1903. Register, p. 431— 525. 

Partial list of comrades buried in the South, p. [532]. 

973.7445 [Spicer, W : A. ed.] History of the 9th and 10th regiments 
J10 R. I. volunteers and the 10th R. I. battery in the union army 

in 1862. Providence, 1892. Rosters, p. 36i— 413. 

973.7445 Rock, li. W. History of the 11th regiment R. I. volunteers in 
Jll the war of the rebellion... Providence, 1881. Roster, p. 201— 16. 

973.7445 Rhode Island— Infantry— 12th regiment. History of the 12th 

J 12b regiment R. I. volunteers in 1862 — 63. [Providence, 1904.] 

Roster, p. 311—87. 

(3) LOCAL 

974.55 Ricklieli, T : W. ...Barrington [R. I.] soldiers in the war of 
qB27 the revolution, the Dorr war, and in the war of the rebellion. 

Providence, 1898. Many lists scattered through the book. 

971.51 BllSS, (w : IV. Historical sketch of the town of East Providence... 

Ea7 Providence, 1876. Men under Lieut. Brown in Col. Carpenter's regiment, 

1776, p. 46 — 6. 

974.59 GriSWOld, S. S. Historical sketch of the town of Hopkinton, 
1177 [R. L] 1757 to 1876... Hope Valley, R. L, 1877. Civil war 

list, p. 4y— 61. 



1911] Lists of New England Soldiers 153 

974.48 BllSS, Leonard, Jr. History of Rehoboth, Bristol County, 

R26 Mass., comprising... the present towns of Rehoboth, Seekonk, 

and Pawtucket...with sketches of Attleborough, Cumberland, 

and a part of Swansey and Barrington. Bost., 1836. revolu- 
tionary list, p. 149—57. 

974.51 Bayles, R : JM. ed. History of Providence County, R. I. 2 

nB34 vols. N. Y., 1891. Military lists under the names of the towns. 

974.59 Irish, J. R. Historical sketch of the town of Richmond from 
R41 1747 to 1776... Hope Valley, R. I., 1877. Civil war list, p. 65— 7. 

974.51 Steere, T : History of the town of Smithfield...l730 to...l871... 

Sm6 Providence, 1 881. Officers and men in the service of the U. S. during the 

rebellion, p. 209— 20. 

973.3445 Baker, Virginia. History of Warren, R. I., in the war of the 

B17 revolution, 1776 — 83. Warren, R. I., 1901. Lists on p. 37— 46. 

974.54 Fuller, 0. P. History of Warwick, R. I. Providence, 1875. 

W26 Warwick in the war of the rebellion, p. 270 — 93. 

974.59 DeniSOIl, Frederic. Westerly (R. I.) and its witnesses for 250 
W52 years, 1626— 1876... Providence, 1878. Civil war rolls, p. 270— 1. 

CONNECTICUT 

353.97466 Connecticut — Adjutaut-£etierah Annual reports...l849 — 
A date. Hartford, 1849 — date. Not analyzed. 

353.97446 Connecticut — Adjutant- General. Record of service of Conn. 

qA men in the. ..revolution.. .war of 181 2... Mexican war... 2 vols. 

Hartford, 1889. Supplemented by the Conn, historical society collections, 
vol.8. 

(1) FRENCH AND INDIAN WAR 

974.6 Connecticut historical society collections. Vol. l — date. 

C76 Hartford, 1860 — date. French and Indian war rolls, vols- 9— 10. 

(2) REVOLUTION 
973.3377 Blirnhani, N. H. Battle of Groton Heights...l781. New Lon- 

B93 1903. Names of heroes who fell at Ft. Uriswold, p. 9—13. 

973.3446 Clark, A. 11. comp. Complete roster of Col. David Waterbury, 
A2 Jr's. regiment of Conn, volunteers ; the 1st regiment of in- 
fantry responding to a call... for the defence of New York City 
against the British... N. Y., 1897. 

974.6 Connecticut historical society collections. Vol. l — date. 

C76 Hartford, 1860 — date. Revolutionary rolls and lists, vol. 8, which forms 

a supplement to Conn.— Adj. Gen. Records of service. 

973.3377 Harris, W: W. Battle of Groton Heights... New London. 

H24 1882. Heroes who fell at Ft. Uriswold, Sept. 6, 1781, with names of wounded 

and prisoners, p. '<;«() — 7'4. 

973.3377 . 1870. P . 85-7. 

H241 

97.'). 3377 [Hempstead, Stephen.] Description of the monument on Groton 
H37 Heights, with the inscription and names. New London, 1878. 

Heroes who fell ;tt Ft. Griswold, p. 2. 

973.3446 Hinman, It. K. comp. Historical collection from official re- 

H581 cords. ..of the part sustained by Conn, during the war of the 

revolution... Hartford, 1842. Contains short lieta of officers appointed. 

973.3377 Rathbllll, Jonathan. Narrative.. .of the capture of Groton 

R18 Fort... n. p. [1840.] Heroes who fell at Ft. Griswold, p. 75-80. 



154 Lists of New England Soldiers [April 

973.3377 Sketches of Col. Ledyard and Mother Bailey, with a com- 

Sk2 plete list of... men killed, wounded, and captured* at the battle 

of Groton Heights, who fought under the command of Col. 
Ledyard. Groton [1897 ?] List, p. 3— 6. 

973.3312 Swett, S : History of Bunker Hill battle... Ed. 3. Bost., 1827. 

Sw42 For Mass., Conn., and N. H. officers probably in the battle, see notes, p. 27—8. 

(3) WAR OF 1812 

973.5236 [Trumbull, J. H. ed.] Defence of Stonington, Conn., against 
T77 a British squadron, Aug. 9 — 12,1814... Hartford, 1864. Names 

of volunteers, p. 20—1. Roll of Potter's company in the 30th regiment Conn, 
militia, commanded by Lieut. -Col. Randall, p. 22—3. 

(4) CIVIL WAR 
(a) General 

973.7446 Connecticut— Adjutant-General. Catalogue of Conn, volun- 

qA teer organizations (infantry, cavalry, and artillery) in the ser- 

vice of the U. S., 1861 — 65, with additional enlistments, casual- 
ties, &c... Hartford, 1869. 

973.7446 Connecticut — Adjutant-General. Catalogue of...regiments, 

A2a Conn, volunteers... [4 vols, in 3.] Hartford, 1861 — 2. 

973.7446 Connecticut — Adjutant-Generah Record of service of Conn. 
qA2 men in the army and navy of the U. S. during the war of the 

rebellion... Hartford, 1889. 

973.7446 Connecticut— Adjutant-General. Register of commissioned 

A2b officers of Conn, volunteers in the service of the U. S., Apr. 1, 

1863. Hartford, 1863. 

973.7446 Croffet, W : A : and Morris. J : HI. Military and civil history 
B of Conn, during the war of 1861 — 65... N. Y., 1869. Roll of 

honor of Conn, volunteer troops, p. 853—70. Our martyrs at Andersonville, p. 
671—2. 

(b) Regimental 

973.7446 Connecticut— Artillery— 1st regiment. History of the 1st 

qF Conn, artillery and of the siege trains of the armies operating 

against Richmond, 1862 — 65. Haiitford, 1893. Contains several 

rosters and lists. 

973.7446 Bennett, E. B. comp. (The) First Conn, heavy artillery, his- 
Fl torical sketch and present addresses of members. East Berlin, 

Conn., n. d. Roster, p. 28—53. 

973.7446 Connecticut— Artillery— 1st regiment. Official souvenir and 

Fib program of monument and dedicatory exercises... 1902, comp... 

by J. B. McNamar. Hartford [1903]. Roster, Apx. 129 p. 

973.7446 Vaiil. T, F. History of the 2d Conn, volunteer heavy artillery, 
F2 originally the 19th Conn, volunteers. "Winsted, Conn., 1868. 

Catalogue of the regiment, p. 252— 'MS. 

973.7446 Beecher, II. W. History of the 1st light battery Conn, volun- 

G teers, 1861 — 65... 2 vols. N. Y. [1901]. Casualties, vol. 2, p. 

822—4. 

973.7446 Marvin, E. E. comp. (The) Fifth regiment Conn, volunteers ; 
J05 a history... Hartford, 1889. Roster, Apx. unpaged. 

973.7446 Cadwell, C : K. (The) old 6th regiment, its war record, 1861 — 

J06 6d... New Haven, 1875. Roster and roll of honor, p. 128— 227. 



1911] Lists of New England Soldiers 155 

973.7446 Walkley, Stephen. History of the 7th Conn, volunteer infantry, 
J07 Hawley's brigade, Terry's division, 10th army corps, 1861 — 65. 

n. p. [1905]. Roster, Apx. p. 2— 69. 

973.7446 Murray, T : H. History of the 9th regiment Conn, volunteer 
J09 infantry, " The Irish regiment/' in the war of the rebellion... 

New Haven, 1903. Roster, p. 241—320. Contains several lists of casual- 
ties and prisoners. 

973.7446 Sprague, H. B. History of the 13th infantry regiment of Conn. 
J13 volunteers during the great rebellion. Hartford, 1867. Roster 

and special lists, p. 261—339. 

973.7446 Page, C : D. History of the 14th regiment Conn, volunteer in- 
J14a fantry. Meriden, 1906. Official roster, p. 373— 509. 

973.7446 Thorpe, S. B. History of the 15th Conn, volunteers... 1861— 
J15 65. New Haven, 1893. Roster, p. [266— 3334. 

973.7446 Walker, W : ۥ History of the 18th regiment Conn, volunteers 
J18 in the war for the Union. Norwich, 1885. Koii of honor, roster, 

promotions, etc., p. 383—435. 

973.7446 Storrs, J : W. (The) " Twentieth Conn." ; a regimental history. 
J20 Ansonia, Conn., 1886. Roster, Apx. 18 p. 

973.7446 Connecticut— Infantry— 2!st regiment. Story of the 21st 

J21 regiment volunteer infantry.. .1861 — 65. Middletown, 1900. 

Official record, Apx. p. 3 — 49. 

973.7446 Sheldon, W. D. (The) "Twenty-seventh"; a regimental his- 

J27 tory. New Haven, 1866. Casualties and rosters, p. 100—44. 

(5) SPANISH-AMERICAN WAR 

973.89446 Connecticut — Adjutant-General* Roster of Conn, volunteers 
A2 who served in the war between the U. S. and Spain, 1898 — 

99. Hartford, 1899. 

(6) LOCAL 

974.61 [Lee, W:W. comp.] Barkhamsted, Conn., and its centennial, 
1876. ..names of soldiers of the revolution, 1812, 1846, and 
1861... Meriden, [Conn.] 1881. List, p. 171— 8. 

974.61 Cot Siren, W : History of ancient Woodbury, Conn.. .including 
W85 the present towns of Washington, Southbury, Bethlehem, Rox- 

bury, and a part of Oxford and Middlebury. 3 vols. Water- 
bury, Conn., 1854 — 79. Lists for the French and Indian war, the revo- 
lution, and war of 1812, vol. 1, p. 777—89. Revolution, vol. 2, p. 1415. Civil war. 
vol. 2, p. 1313—42. 

974.62 Stiles, H : II. History and genealogies of ancient Windsor, 
qW721 Conn., including East Windsor, South Windsor, Bloomfield, 

Windsor Locks, and Ellington... 2 vols. Hartford, 1891. 

General lists, with special ones also under names of towns. 

974.62 Stiles, H : It. History of ancient Windsor, Conn., including East 

W72 Windson, South Windsor, and Ellington prior to 17 68. ..and 

Windsor, Bloomfield, and Windsor Locks to the present... 

N. Y. 1859. French and Indian war, p. 337— 52. Revolution, p. 417. 

74.69 Orcutt, S : History of the city of Bridgeport, Conn. [New 

B76 Haven]], 1887. Officers and all who have been members of Ellas Howe, 

Jr., Post No. 3, G. A. R., p. 471—85. 

974.69 Orcutt, S : History of the old town of Stratford and the city of 

St8 Bridgeport, Conn. 2 vols. New Haven, 1886. Officers and all who 

have been members of Elias Howe, Jr., Post No. 3, G. A. B., vol. 2, p. 935—49. 



156 



Lists of New England Soldiers 



[April 



974.61 
N42 

974.67 
M542 

974.61 
C81 

974.61 ■ 
C811 

974.69 
qD19 
974.69 
St21 

974.67 
D44 

974.66 
D93 

974.62 
Ea7 

974.62 
qW721 

974.62 
W72 



974.69 
qli93 

974.61 
G691 

974.67 
G94 

974.67 
G942 



974.67 
H17 

974.61 
qK41 

974.65 
L492 

974.65 

L68 

974.61 
L71 



Orciltt, S : History of the towns of New Milford and Bridge- 
water, Conn... Hartford, 1882. French war, p. 225— 9. Revolution, 
p. 218—19, 224. Civil war, p. 542—6. 

Gillespie. C : B. comp. Historic record.. .of Meriden, Conn.. .a 
century of Meriden... Meriden, 1906. Meriden, Waiiingford, and 

Cheshire in the early wars, p. 2(53—86. 

Gold, T. $. ed. Historical records of the town of Cornwall, 
Litchfield county, Conn. Hartford, 1877. Revolution, p. 205— 7. 

Soldiers buried at Cornwall, p. 225—9. 
. Ed. 2. 1904. Same. 



Bailey, J. IH. History of Danbury, Conn., 1684 — 1896.. .comp... 

by S. B. Hill. N. Y., 1896. Civil war rosters, p. 382— 407. 

Huntington, E. B. History of Stamford, Conn... including 
Darien... Stamford, 1868. Revolution, p. 232—48. 

Orcutt, S: and Beardsley, Ambrose. History of the old town 

of Derby, Conn., 1642—1880... Springfield, Mass., 1880. 

Civil war lists, p. 490—511. 

Fowler, W : C, History of Durham, Conn... Hartford, 1866. 

French and Indian war, p. 140. Civil war, p. 152. 

Goodwin, J. 0. East Hartford, its history and traditions. Hart- 
ford, 1879. French and Indian war, 77— 8. Revolution, p. 82— 4. War of 
1812, p. 203. Civil war, p. 208—11. 

Stiles, H : R. History and genealogies of ancient Windsor, 
Conn., including East Windsor, South Windsor, Bloomfield, 
Windsor Locks, and Ellington... 2 vols. Hartford, 1891. 

General lists, with special ones also under names of towns. 

Stiles, H : it. History of ancient Windsor, Conn., including East 
Windsor, South Windsor, and Ellington prior to 17 68.. .and 
Windsor, Bloomfield, and Windsor Locks to the present... 

N. Y., 1859. French and Indian war, p. 337— 52. 

Hurd, D. H. History of Fairfield county, Conn... 2 vols. Phil., 

1881. Military lists under names of towns. 

Hibbard, A. G: History of the town of Goshen, Conn... Hart- 
ford, 1897. Revolutionary lists, p. 118, 120, 126—9, 152—6. 

Smith, R. D. History of Guilford, Conn... Albany, 1877. 

Civil war roll of honor, p. 191 — 3. 

Steiner, B. ۥ History of the plantation of Menunkatuck and 
of the original town of Guilford, Conn., comprising the present 
towns of Guilford and Madison... Bait., 1897. French war, p. 

423—4. Revolution, 445—54. Civil war, p. 464—9. 

Hamden (Conn.)* ...History of the town... New Haven, 1888. 

Revolution, war of 1812, and civil war, p. 200—5. 

Atwater, Francis. History of Kent, Conn... Meriden, Conn., 

1897. Revolution, p. 31— 3, 36— 7. Civil war, p. 41— 6. 

Avery, J : comp. History of the town of Ledyard, 1650 — 1900. 

Norwich, Conn, 1901. Revolution, p. 79. 

Bishop, II : F. Historical sketch of Lisbon, Conn., from 1786 — 

1900. N. Y. [cl903]. Revolution, war of 1812, and civil war, p. 64— 6. 

Kilbourne, P. K. Sketches and chronicles of the town of Litch- 
field, Conn... Hartford, 1859. French and Indian war, p. 80—1, Revo- 
lution, p. 94—101, 



1911] Lists of JSTeiv England Soldiers 157 

974.61 History of Litchfield county, Conn... Phil., 1881. Military 

qH62 lists under history of regimeuts and names of towns. 

974.67 Steiner, B. C. History of the plantation of Menunkatuck and of 

G942 the original town of Guilford, Conn., comprising the present 

towns of Guilford and Madison... Bait., 1897. French war, p. 

423—4. Revolution, p. 445—54. Civil war, p. 464—9. 

974.67 Gillespie, (/ : B. comp. Historic record.. .of Meriden, Conn. ..a 
M542 century of Meriden... Meriden, 1906. Meriden, Waiiingford, and 

Cheshire in the early wars, p. 263—86. Meriden in the civil war, p. 4—19. 

974.67 BroilSOIl, I! : History of Waterbury, Conn., the original town- 

W29 ship embracing the present Watertown and Plymouth, and parts 

of Oxford, Wolcott, Middlebury, Prospect, and Naugatuck... 

Waterbury, 1858. Revolution, p. 349-50. 

974.66 History of Middlesex county, Conn... N. Y., 1884. civiiwar 

qII62 list arranged by towns, p. 44 — 58. 

929.1 Baker, II: A. History of Montville, Conn... Hartford, 1896. 

B 1 7 Civil war, p. 695—700. 

974.67 BronSOH, II: History of Waterbury, Conn., the original town- 
W29 ship embracing the present Watertown and Plymouth, and parts 

of Oxford, Wolcott, Middlebury, Prospect, and Naugatuck... 

Waterbury, 1858. Revolution, p. 349—50. 

973.765 Naugatuck (Conn.). Record of the erection and dedication of 
N22 the soldiers' monument... Naugatuck, 1885. Soldiers credited to 

the town, p. 34—41. Enlisted in other places, buried in Naugatuck, and roster 
of Isbell Post, No. 43, p. 42—4. 

974.62 Adams, S. W. History of ancient Wethersfield, Conn., com- 
qW53 prising the present towns of Wethersfield, Rocky Hill, and 

Newington...ed. by H : R. Stiles. 2 vols. N. Y., 1904. French 

and Indian war, vol. 1, p. 397—413. Revolution, vol. 1, p. 507—35. 

974.65 Hurd, D. II. comp. History of New London county, Conn... 

qH93 2 vols. Phil., 1882. Civil war roll for the county in vol. 1. Military 

lists under Dames of towns. 

974.61 New Milford (Conn.). Two centuries of New Milford, Conn... 

N42ml N. Y. [cl907]. Colonial wars, revolution, war of 1812, Mexican, civil, and 

Spanish-American, p. 45—66. 

974.61 Orcutt, S: History of the towns of New Milford and Bridge- 

N42 water, Conn... Hartford, 1882. French war, p. 225— 9. Revolution, 

p. 218—9, 224. Civil war, p. 542—56. 

974.61 Crissey, T. W. comp. ...History of Norfolk, Litchfield county, 

N761 Conn... Everett, Mass., 1900. Revolution, p. 82—91. Rebellion, p. 

306—17. 

974.69 Norwalk (Conn.) historical and memorial library associa- 

N833 lion* Norwalk after 250 years. ..with the record of soldiers 

and sailors enlisted in Norwalk from 1676 — 1898. South Nor- 
walk [1902]. Lists, p. 179— 95. 

974.65 Caulkins, F. M, History of Norwich, Conn... [Hartford] 

N831 18^)'). Veterans of 1812, footnote, p. 678. Civil war list, with some biogra- 

phy, fi80— 92. 

974.65 Dana* HI. HI. Norwich memorial ; the annals of Norwich, New 
N835 London county, Conn., in the great rebellion of 1861 — 65. 

Norwich, 1873. Has several lists. 

923.57 Dana, II. HI. G. Our brave boys: memorial discourse delivered 
D19 in the 2d Congregational church, Norwich, Conn., Dec. 10, 

1865. Norwich, 1866. Names of all In service In the civil war from this 
church, p. 56—8. 



158 Lists of New England Soldiers [April 

974.67 Bronson, H: History of Waterbury, Conn., the original town- 

W29 ship embracing the present Watertown and Plymouth, and parts 

of Oxford, Wolcott, Middlebury, Prospect, and Naugatuck... 

Waterbury, 1858. Revolution, p. 349— 50 

974.67 Orcutt, S : and Beardsley, Ambrose, History of the old town 

D44 of Derby, Conn., 1642—1880... Springfield, Mass., 1880. 

Civil war list for Oxford, p. 511—13. 

974.61 Atwater, Francis, comp. History of the town of Plymouth, 
P74 Conn... Meriden, Conn., 1895. Civil war list, p. 113—22. 

974.61 Atwater, Francis. Souvenir history [of] Plymouth, Conn., 

qP74 1795 — 1895. Meriden, Conn. [1895 ?]. Roster of soldiers enlisting 

from or belonging to Plymouth, p. 24—7. 

974.67 Bronson, H: History of Waterbury, Conn., the original town- 

W29 ship embracing the present Watertown and Plymouth, and parts 

of Oxford, Wolcott, Middlebury, Prospect, and Naugatuck... 

Waterbury, 1858. Revolution, p. 349— 50. 

973.3446 Grumman, W : E. Revolutionary soldiers of Redding, Conn., 
G92 and the record of their services... Hartford, 1904. Lists, p. 20, 

36—7, 60—3, 72. 

974.69 Todd, C: B. History of Redding, Conn... N. Y. [cl906]. 

qR24 Revolution, p. 64—75. Civil war, p. 141—6. 

974.69 Teller, D. W. History of Ridgefield, Conn... Danbury, 1878. 

R43 Revolution, p. 48—9. Civil war, p. 235—8. 

974.62 Adams, S. W, History of ancient Wethersfield, Conn., com- , 
qW53 prising the present towns of Wethersfield, Rocky Hill, and 

Newington...ed. by H : R. Stiles. 2 vols. N. Y., 1904. French and 

Indian war, vol. 1, p. 397—413. Revolution, v. 1, p. 507—35. 

974.61 Cothren, W : History of ancient Woodbury, Conn... including 
W85 the present towns of Washington, Southbury, Bethlehem, Rox- 

bury, and a part of Oxford and Middlebury. 3 vols. Water- 
bury, Conn., 1854 — 79. Lists for the French and Indian war, the revo. 

lution, and war of 1812, vol. 1, p. 777—89. Revolution, vol. 2, p. 1415. Civil war, 
vol. 2, p. 1313—42. 

974.67 Campbell, H. A. and Sharp?, W : C. and Bassett, F. G. Sey- 

Se91 mour, past and present. Seymour, 1902. Revolution, war of 1812, 

Mexican, and civil wars, p. 335—48. Upson Post, G. A. R., p.„359. 

974.67 Orcutt, S : and Beardsley, Ambrose. History of the old town 

D44 of Derby, Conn., 1642—1880... Springfield, Mass., 1880. 

Civil war list for Seymour, p. 513 — 20. 

974.67 Sliarpe, W : C. History of Seymour, Conn... Seymour, 1879. 

Se9 Seymour in the rebellion, p. 92—8. Civil war soldiers enlisted elsewhere, but 

residents of or buried in the town, p. 99—100. 

974.61 Sedgwick, C : F : General history of the town of Sharon, Litch- 

Sh21 field county, Conn... Amenia, N. Y., 1898. Soldiers of the revo- 

lution belonging to Sharon, Apx. E, p. 177. 

941.61 Cothren, W: History of ancient Woodbury, Conn.. .including 
W85 the present towns of Washington, Southbury, Bethlehem, Rox- 

bury, and a part of Oxford and Middlebury. 3 vols. Water- 
bury, Conn., 1854 — 79. Lists for the French and Indian war, the revo- 
lution, and war of 1812, vol. 1, p. 777—89. Revolution, vol. 2, p. 1415. Civil war, 
vol. 2, p. 1313—42. 

974.62 Stiles, II : R. History and genealogies of ancient Windsor, Conn., 
qW721 including East Windsor, South Windsor, Bloomfield, Windsor 

Locks, and Ellington .. 2 vols. Hartford, 1891. General lists, 

with special ones also under names of towns. 



1911] 



Lists of New England Soldiers 



159 



974.62 Stiles, H : R. History of ancient Windsor, Conn., including East 

W72 Windsor, South Windsor, and Ellington prior to 17 68. ..and 

Windsor, Bloomfield, and Windsor Locks to the present... 

N. Y., 1859. French and Indian war, p. 337—52. 

974.69 Huntington, E. B. History of Stamford, Conn...including 
St21 Darien... Stamford, 1868. Revolution, p. 232— 48. 

974.69 Huntington, E. B. Stamford soldiers' memorial... Stamford, 

St23 1869. Has much biographical matter. 

929.1 Wheeler, R» A. History of the town of Stonington, New Lon- 
W56 don county, Ct... New London, 1900. Revolution, p. 46— 8. War 

of 1812, p. 71—2. Civil war, p. 81—4. 

974.64 Waldo, Li P« Early history of Tolland, an address... Hart- 

T581 ford, 1861. French and Indian, p. 45—7. Revolution, p. 50—8. 

974.61 Orcntt, S: History of Torrington, Conn. Albany, 1878. Revo- 

T63 lutionary lists, p. 221— 3, 226— 9, 235— 6. Civil war, p. 238— 42. 

974.64 Hammond, € : History of Union, Conn...comp. by H. M. Law- 

Un3 SOn... New Haven, 1893. Revolution, p. 132— 7. Civil war, p. 146—7, 149. 

974.67 Gillespie, C : B t comp. Historic record.. .of Meriden, Conn.. .a 
M542 century of Meriden... Meriden, 1906. Meriden, Waiiingford, and 

Cheshire in the early wars, p. 263—86. 

974.61 Cothren, W : History of ancient Woodbury, Conn.. .including 
W85 the present towns of Washington, Southbury, Bethlehem, Rox- 

bury, and a part of Oxford and Middlebury. 3 vols. Water- 
bury, Conn., 1854 — 79. Lists for the French and Indian war, the revo- 
lution, and war of 1812, vol. 1, p. 777—89. Revolution, vol. 2, p. 1415. Civil war, 
vol. 2, p. 1313—42. 

974.67 Anderson, Joseph, ed. Town and city of Waterbury, Conn... 3 

W291 vols. New Haven, 1896. Colonial wars, vol. 1, p. 391— 7, 467. Revolu- 

tion, vol. 1, p. 460—7. 

974.67 Bronson, H: History of Waterbury, Conn., the original town- 

W29 ship embracing the present Watertown and Plymouth, and parts 

of Oxford, Wolcott, Middlebury, Prospect, and Naugatuck... 

Waterbury, 1858. Revolution, p. 349— 50. 

974.61 Dayton, F: [and Richardson, IV. S.]. Historical sketch of 

W31 Watertown, Conn. 3 vols. Waterbury, Conn., 1845 — 71. 

Civil war record, vol. 3, p. 11—14. 

974.62 Adams, S. W. History of ancient Wethersfield, Conn., com- 
qW53 prising the present towns of Wethersfield, Rocky Hill, and 

Newington...ed. by H: R. Stiles. 2 vols. N. Y., 1904. French 

and Indian war, vol. 1, p. 397—413. Revolution, vol. 1, p. 507—35. 

974.61 Boyd, J : Annals and family records of Winchester, Conn... 
W72 Hartford, 1873. Civil war lists, p. 463-81. 

974.64 Lamed, E. D. History of Windham county, Conn... 2 vols. 

L32 Worcester, Mass., 1874 — 80. French and Indian war, vol. 1, p. 565—7. 

974.62 Stiles, II : R. History and genealogies of ancient Windsor, Conn., 
qW721 including East Windsor, South Windsor, Bloomfield, Windsor 

Locks, and Ellington... 2 vols. Hartford, 1891. General lists, 

with special ones also under names of towns. 

974.62 Stiles, II : R. History of ancient Windsor, Conn., including East 

W72 Windsor, South Windsor, and Ellington prior to 17 68. ..and 

Windsor, Bloomfield, and Windsor Locks to the present... 

N. Y., 1859. French and Indian war, p. 337— 52. Revolution, p. 417. 



160 English Ancestors of 'Edmond Hawes [April 

974.67 Bronson, H : History of Waterbury, Conn., the original town- 

W29 ship embracing the present Watertown and Plymouth, and parts 

of Oxford, Wolcott, Middlebury, Prospect and Naugatuck... 

Waterbury, 1858. Revolution, p. 349—50. 

974.61 Cothren, W: History of ancient Woodbury, Conn... including 
W85 the present towns of Washington, Southbury, Bethlehem, Rox- 

bury, and a part of Oxford and Middlebury. 3 vols. Water- 
bury, Conn., 1854 — 79. Lists for the French and Indian war, the revo- 
lution and the war of 1812, vol. 1, p. 777—89. Revolution, vol. 2, p. H15. Civil 
war, vol. 2, p. 1313—42. 



THE ENGLISH ANCESTORS OF EDMOND HAWES 

OF YARMOUTH, MASS. 

By James W. Hawes of New York City 

It has been known that Edmond Hawes, described as a cutler, late of 
London, was among those who shipped about 5 April 1635, to sail from 
Southampton in the ship James for New England, a and that he arrived in 
Boston 3 June 1635, after a passage of about five weeks. b His subsequent 
career is known from the colonial and local records. He was in Duxbury 
in 1637, and was chosen constable there in 1642. In or prior to March 
1645, he removed to Yarmouth, where he was active in public affairs until 
his death in 1693. He was one of the selectmen and town clerk and 
treasurer for many years, and for many years represented the town in the 
Colony Court. He left one son, John (who married Desire, daughter of 
Capt. John Gorham and granddaughter of John Howland, the Mayflower 
passenger), also active in public affairs in the town, from whom descended 
the Haweses of Yarmouth, Chatham, and other towns on Cape Cod. 

Nothing, however, was known of his parentage or place of birth until 
the writer recently, with the pecuniary assistance of two other descendants 
of Edmond, Messrs. William T. Wardwell and James Anderson Hawes, 
of New York City, employed Mr. Gerald Fothergill of New Wandsworth, 
London, to make investigations. 

The records of the Cutlers' Company of London, recently rendered 
accessible, revealed that the emigrant was the son of Edmond Hawes of 
Solihull (a parish about seven miles southeast of Birmingham), Warwick- 
shire, gentleman; that he bound himself, 14 February 1626-7, to Edmond 
Warnett, d a citizen and cutler of London, for the term of eight years from 
2 February preceding, and that he was sworn free cutler 9 December 1634. 
The will of Francis Hawes (a relative, degree not known) of Belchamp 

a Drake's Founders of New England, pp. 55-6. 

b Winthrop's Journal (Hosmer's ed ), vol. 1, p. 152. 

c Services were also performed by Miss P. Smith of Queen's Gardens, London. 
Acknowledgments are due for valuable assistance, gratuitously given, to Mr. P. E. 
Martineau, a local antiquary of Knowle, Warwickshire; to Rev. Robert Pemberton, 
author of " Solihull and its Church," of Birmingham, England; and to Mr. Frank M. 
Hawes, a descendant of Richard Hawes, of Somerville, Mass., who is engaged on a 
genealogy of the various lines of Massachusetts Haweses. 

d Probably a relative or connection by marriage. See Waters's Gleanings, pp. 1345- 
7, wills of Robert and John Baker. 



1911] English Ancestors of Edniond Hawes 161 

St. Paul, county of Essex, dated 21 November 1621, and proved in the 
Prerogative Court of Canterbury 2 April 1622, gives all his freehold and 
copyhold estates, subject to an annuity of £5 a year to the testator's sister, 
Anne Morris, to Edmond Hawes, youngest son of Edmond Hawes, of 
Solihull, gentleman. 

The testator's sister and William Rastall having entered upon the lands 
devised and attempted to suppress the will, Edmond Hawes the younger 
(then 14 years of age), by Edmond Hawes the elder, his father and guar- 
dian, brought a suit in Chancery, 15 May 1622, against Anne Morris and 
William Rastall (an executor of the will), to establish his right, which evi- 
dently resulted in his favor. By deed, dated 12 February 1633-4, he sold 
his right in these estates to Sir Leventhorpe Franche, Knight, for the 
consideration of £250. e The printed parish register of Solyhull (Parish 
Register Society, vol. 53) shows the baptisms of Edmond and his brothers 
and sisters. They are all styled Mr. or Mrs., and described as son or 
daughter of Mr. Edmond Hawes of Hillfield or Shelley, the family estates. 
The register also shows the marriages and deaths of certain members of 
the Hawes line. 

The Visitation of Warwickshire made in 1619, f gives the pedigree of 
the family for eight generations down to the emigrant, Edmond (Edmond, 
William, Thomas, Thomas, Thomas, Thomas, Thomas). 

The original of this pedigree, signed by Eldmond Hawes, father of the 
emigrant, is in the College of Arms, London. This visitation and Burke's 
General Armory (p. 468) give the arms of the family as sable, a chevron 
argent between three leopards' faces or. For several generations they had 
intermarried with arms-bearing families of Warwickshire and other counties. 

Hillfield Hall was rebuilt by William Hawes, grandfather of the emi- 
grant, in 1576, and the front remains substantially in its original shape 
to-day. Over the front door is the following inscription, containing the 
initials of William Hawes and his wife Ursula : 

H 
W. V. 

1576 

Hie hospites, in Coelo Gives. , g 

In the parish church is an inscription laudatory of this William. 

Pemberton (op. cit. p. 42) gives one more generation than the Visitation 
of Warwickshire, beginning with Thomas Hawes of Shirley, who purchased 
Hillfield about 1311. 

A manuscript in the Bridges collection in the Bodleian Library at Ox- 
ford, attributed to William Belchier of Northamptonshire, reproduces in- 
scriptions existing in the Hawes mansion in Solihull (probably about 1 600 
or earlier), giving the marriage of Thomas Hawes in 1465 to Ann Gres- 
wolde, with the Hawes arms impaling those of Greswolde (argent, a fess 
gules between two greyhounds courant sable), the marriage of Thomas 
Hawes in 1527 to Elizabeth Brome, with the Hawes arms impaling those 
of Brome (sable, on a chevron argent three sprigs of broom slipped vert), 
and the marriage of William Hawes in 1562 to Ursula Colles, with the 
Hawes arms impaling those of Colles (gules, on a chevron argent pelletee 
four barrulets sable between three lions' heads erased or). 

e Close Rolls in Public Record Office. 
f Harleian Society, vol. 12, pp. 404-5. 
gHere sojourners, in Heaven citizens. 



162 English Ancestors of Edmond Hawes [April 

Excluding the earlier generations alluded to above, the English pedigree 
will be : 

1. Thomas Hawes married, 1465, Ann Greswolde. 11 
Child : 

2. i. Thomas, and probably others. 

2. Thomas Hawes ( Thomas) married, about 1500, Joan Rainsford, 1 

buried 26 August, 1558. 
Children : 

3. i. Thomas. 

ii. Elizabeth, m. , and had Ann. 

iii. Catherine, m. 23 Nov. 1539, William Smallwood. 

iv. Ann, m. Gibbons. 

Perhaps others. 

3. Thomas Hawes {Thomas, Thomas) married first, in 1527, Eliza- 

beth Brome, daughter of Nicholas,J Esq., of Baddesley Clinton, 
probably by his third wife, Lettice, daughter of Nicholas Catesby ; 

and secondly, Elinor , buried 12 June 1514. He left a 

will filed in the Consistory of Lichfield, 27 October 1574, in which 
he mentions his wife Elinor, his son and heir William and the 
latter's son Thomas, daughter Elizabeth (wife of Thomas Jackson) 
and her son Thomas, daughter Hatley and her children, daughter 

Margaret, son-in-law Doctor Brainton, sister Elizabeth and 

her daughter Ann, sister Catherine Wood, sister Ann Gibbons, and 
cousin Thomas Greswolde. His first wife was buried in the Bad- 
desley Clinton Church, near her father, where she had an epitaph. k 

Children, probably all by his first wife : 

4. i. William, b. in 1531. 

ii. Constance, 1 m. Thomas Speherd, yeoman; not mentioned in her 

father's will, 
iii. Elizabeth, m. Thomas Jackson, and had Thomas. 

iv. A daughter, m. Hatley, and had issue. 

v. A daughter, m. Dr. Brainton. 

vi. Margaret. 

* The Greswoldes sprang from John Greswolde of Kenilworth, Warwickshire. 
Richard Greswolde died before 1412. Thomas Greswelde about 1438 had custody of 
the manor of Solihull under the Crown, and from about 1443 to about 1458 was a 
justice of the peace. (Dugdale, History of Warwickshire, p. 696; Visitation of War- 
wickshire, 1619, p. 61.) 

iThe Rainsford (or Raynesford) family were from Lancashire and Oxfordshire. 
Their original arms were argent, a cross sable. (Visitation of Oxfordshire, Harleian 
Society, vol. 5, p. 165 ; Visitation of Warwickshire, p. 48 ; 3 Miscellanea Genealogica 
et Heraldica, vol. 2, p. 158.) 

J Nicholas Brome, the father of Elizabeth, was lord of the manor of Baddesley 
Clinton. He died in 1517, and was buried in the church there, where there was an 
inscription to his memory. He was Justice of the Peace for several years, and at one 
time Sheriff of Warwick and Leicestershire. The family was an ancient one in 
Warwickshire. His great-grandfather, Robert Brome, was a lawyer. His grand- 
father, John Brome, was member of Parliament for the Borough of Warwick in 1406. 
His father, John Brome, a lawyer, who bought the manor, was Under-treasurer in the 
Exchequer in the reign of Henry VI. (between 1422 and 1461), and held other offices. 
Ihis John Brome was slain in 1468 on the porch of the White Friars' Church, London, 
where he was attending mass, by John Herthill, steward to the Earl of Warwick, in 
a quarrel over a mortgage which Brome held against Herthill. He was buried in the 
White Friars' Church, and there was a Latin epitaph inscribed on his tombstone. 
(Dugdale, op. cit. pp. 710-13.) 

k Dugdale, op. cit. p. 713. 

Visitation of Warwickshire, 1619, p. 405. 



1911] English Ancestors of Edmond Hawes 163 

4. William Hawes (Thomas, Thomas, Thomas) married, in 1562, 

Ursula Colles, daughter of William" 1 of Leigh, co. Worcester, 
and was buried 31 Oct. 1611, aged 80 years. She was buried 26 
Oct. 1615, aged 76 years. He left a will and codicil proved in the 
Consistory of Lichfield 14 Jan. 1611-12, in which he mentions his 
wife Ursula, son Edmond, a deceased son, daughters Elizabeth and 
Ursula, youngest daughter Constance, son-in-law William Sheldon, 
grandchildren William Hawes and Jane Hawes, brother-in-law 
Michael Colles, and the latter's son Humphrey, cousin Reginald 
Brome, Esq. The inventory of his estate amounted to £378 0s. 
10(1, and included a virginal, chessboard, clock, map, etc. His wid- 
dow left a will, dated 25 March 1614 and proved in the Consistory 
of Lichfield 3 Nov. 1615, in which she mentions son Edmond and 
wife, daughters Sheldon, Hunt, Constance Hawes, grandchildren 
Jane, William, Ursula, and the rest of her son Edmond's children 
(not named), brother Mr. Michael Colles and his wife, nephew Mr. 
Humphrey Colles. The inventory of her estate amounted to £165 
2s. 8d. 
Children : 

i. Ursula. 

ii. Elizabeth, m. 16 Oct. 1588, William Sheldon, of Bromsgrove, 

co. Worcester. 
5. iii. Edmond. 

iv. Thomas, not mentioned in his father's or mother's will. 

v. William, not mentioned in his father's or mother's will ; d. without 

issue, 
vi. Ursula, m. 8 Nov. 1595, Raphael Hunt of Stoke Green, parish of 

Hanbury, co. Worcester, 
vii. Constance, uiim. in 1615. 
viii. A son, not mentioned in his parents' wills. 

5. Edmond Hawes ( William, Thomas, Thomas, Thomas) married be- 

fore 1600, Jane Porter, daughter of Richard" of Bayham, co. 
Sussex. By deed dated 16 May 1604, with his cousin Humphrey 
Colles of the Middle Temple, he bought the lordship of Solihull 
for £1080 from Thomas, grandson of Sir George Throckmorton, 
Knight, and afterward sold it to Samuel Marrow, Esq. He was 
living as late as 1653. p 

ra William Colles, the father of Ursula, married Margaret, sister and co-heir of John 
Hitch, lie died in 1508, aged 63 years, and was buried in the Church at Leigh, where 
there was an inscription to his memory. His eldest sou Edmond, who died in 1606, 
aged 76 years, had been justice of the peace, deputy lieutenant of Worcestershire, and 
sheriff of that county. William Colles also had a son Michael, of Hampden in Arden, 
Warwickshire, and Hradwell, Buckinghamshire, besides other children. The family 
had been seated in Worcestershire since the 14th century, and owned estates in many 
parts of that and other counties. (Grazebrook, Heraldry of Worcestershire, p. 121; 
Nash, History of Worcestershire, pp. 76, 400; Habington, Survey of Worcestershire, 
pp. 32'J-;'/2, 399, 400, 642.) 

n Richard Porter, of Bayham, co. Sussex, father of Jane, married Jane, daughter of 
Robert Whitfield, of Worth in the same county. He was fourth in descent from 
William Porter, ofMarkham, Nottinghamshire. After his de.ith his widow married 
Edward Qainby, Esquire, of Titchheld, Hampshire. The Porter arms were sable, 
three church bells argent, a canton ermine, (.'rest, a portcullis argent, chained or. 
Visitation of Kent, L619 (Harleian Society, vol.42), p. 156; Berry, Kent Genealogies, 
p. 321; Waters, Gleanings, p. L436 (wills of Edward and Jane Quinby). 

Dngdale, op. cit. p. B90. 

p Pemberton, op. cit. p. .7J. 



164 English Ancestors of Edmond Hawes [April 

Children : 

i. Jane, bapt. 5 Oct. 1G00. 

ii. Ursula, bapt. 19 Jan. 1G01-2; bur. Apr. 1602. 

iii. Lucy, bapt. 12 Jan. 1602-3. 

iv. William, bapt. 30 Dec. 1604. 

v. Thomas, bur. 21 Apr. 1095 (an infant). 

vi. Uksula, bapt. 26 Oct. 1606. 

vii. Mary, bapt. 25 Oct. 1607 ; perhaps bur. 12 Oct. 1616. 

viii. Edmond, the emigrant, b. 1608; bapt. 15 Oct. 1612. 

ix. Ann, bapt. 5 Sept. 1609. 

x. John, bapt. 13 Apr. 1611. 

xi. Elizabeth, bapt. 18 Aug. 1616. 

xii. Ruth, bapt. June 1618. 

Thomas who died in 1558, Thomas who died in 1574, William, 
and the latter's son Edmond, are all styled gentlemen in the records 
of their time. 

The name seems originally to have been Hawe ; at any rate it is 
frequently so written in the ancient records, but the emigrant and 
his descendants and his ancestors, at least so far back as his great- 
grandfather Thomas, uniformly wrote it Hawes. The name was 
widely distributed in England in the early part of the 1 7th century, 
and appears not only in Warwickshire and adjacent counties but 
also in London and neighboring counties, and elsewhere. 

Besides Edmond, among the early settlers of Massachusetts were 
Edward Hawes, who was in Dedham in 1648 ; Richard Hawes of 
Dorchester, who came in the Truelove in September 1635; and 
Robert Hawes of Salem, Wenham, and Roxbury, in which last- 
named town he died in 1666. There is no evidence that these were 
of kin to each other, and they certainly were not nearly related to 
Edmond, although it seems not improbable that Richard was of the 
Warwickshire stock. 

Respecting the emigrant Edmond Hawes, it may be observed that 
Winsor, in his History of Duxbury (p. 81), says the office of con- 
stable was one " of high trust and responsibility, and none were 
elected to it but men of good standing." In fact, in early times, 
constables instead of being mere peace officers, as now, had various 
other functions, such as acting as collectors of taxes, as coroners in 
summoning juries of inquest, and when a call was made for military 
duty impressing men for the service. 

Swift in " Old Yarmouth " (p. 79), speaking of the early settlers, 
savs : " Anthony Thacher, Edmond Hawes, and Richard Sears were 
certainly men of education and social standing in England " ; and 
(p. 81) : " Lawyers were not tolerated in the Colony, but con- 
veyances, wills and other legal writings were executed by Anthony 
Thacher, Edmund Hawes and John Miller, according to the 
formulas of English practice." 

A school existed at Solihull as early as 1560, when the endow- 
ment of certain chantry chapels in the parish church was devoted to 
the salary of a schoolmaster. Mr. Home, a graduate of Oxford 
University, was master during the boyhood of Edmond Hawes, the 
emigrant, who was no doubt educated in this school, where Latin 
at that time would have been a principal element in the curriculum. q 

<i The Victoria History of the County of Warwick, vol. 2, pp. 357-60. 



1911] 



Emigrants to America from Liverpool 



165 



Aug 1 



1702 



LIST OF EMIGRANTS TO AMERICA F&OM LIVERPOOL 

1697-1707 

Transcribed by Miss Elizabeth French, and communicated by the Committee on 

English Research* 

[Concluded from page 50] 

Servants bound to M' Nathn 1 Hughes 
Dorathy Tipping of Garston Lancasr 

16. April 93 [_sic~\ Mary Adrick of Barton Lane 

17. Feb. 1702 Mary Moor of Aughton Lan' 
28. 8b. 1702 Eliz : Sharp of Pelton Lane 
23. 8b. 1702 Margar" Taylor of Ratclffe Lancast 
16 Feb. 1702 Ellen Owen of Farnith Lane' 
7 March 1702 Georg Burgesse of Preston 
20 Janu' 1702 Henry Lea of Pickdell 

mem there is one & half more Owing for. 



21 
21 
25 

18 
18 
20 
22 
14 



4 

4 
4 
4 
5 
4 
4 
6 



Octob 9 1703 W m Watson" Son of Sam 1 Watson late of Macclesf* 

in Cheshire gent Serv 1 to m' Bryan Brundell 



I 



ye a res 

4 



An Ace* of Servants bound to m J no Smalwood to go in y e Lamb 



71) 



Aug 8t 13 1703 Philip Stockton of Clayton Parish Lane 
James Dawson of Lealand 
Sarah Johnson [of] Pontefract in Yorksh' 
Tho : Slater of Manches* 
Alice Chadwyck of Brindle Lancasr' 
Ellen Hodgson of Thornton 
Henry Lloy d of Conway in Wales 
Jno Living of Manchest' 
Mary Piatt of Preston on y e Hill Chesh 
KHz Lewis of Foodild Parish Cheshir 
Mary Stewart of London 

] of Cheshire 



8b 



14 

17 

20 

30 

13 

9 

1 

4 

8 



age years 

7 
8 
5 
5 
5 
5 
8 

4 
5 
7 



14 
14 

22 
20 
20 

15 

23: 
23: 
25: 



To m' Jno Birch 
1M). 1 1703 Thorn Prestidg of Vardy Green, near Munches' 15 : 7 



To m Peter M,an 
Janu : 25thl703 Mary Fletcher of Winston Spinst aged 



21 : 



Tom' J"° Laurill 
Janr 12 1703 Kath' Hughes of Arlslie in the County of Salip 



22 



99 " Gulielmus Watson films Samnelis Watson generosi et Sarae vxoris Eiua natna 
fuit Primo Die Martij Baptizatusq inCapella Parochialide Macclesfeild Decimo Tertio 
lie Die Ejusdem mensis Annoque domi lo7'2-:j." From the Cborcb Registers of Mac- 
liesfield. This Latin entry, which is in a Large and elaborate hand, covering half a 

page, in contrast U> the carelessly written and abbreviated form used in other entries, 
shows the social importance of the family. 



166 Emigrants to America from Liverpool [April 

ead die Margtte Dickinson of Wavertree Spinst 22 : 4 

Feb 7 1703 Alice Bertinsh' of Manch' Spinst 21 : 4 

Fbr ead die Hannah Hairclipe of Hallifax in y e County of York 

Widow 27 : 4 

Feb. 4. 1703 William Yates of Prescott husbandm' 18 : 4 

2. 1703 Ellen Wliitlisse of Hinley Spinst. to m Rich d Gil- 
dart but Assign' to Cap fc Lanes t' 15 : 7 
Febr. 9 1703 Sam 1 Hartless of Sanbych in Cheshire to m' : Thorn' 

Williamson but assigned to m' J n Lancast' 



To m' Peter Hall 
March 31. 1704 William Strickland Appr. to m' Peter Hall 14 : 10 



To m' : Nathaniel Hughes to go in y e : great Eliz : 

April 5 Eliz : Cooper of Hanforth Spinst : in Cheshire 

5 Ann Lingard of M C( 'lesfield in Cheshire 

5 Mary Williams- of Holywell Spinst 

5 Mary Lawrence of Liverpoole Spr 

5 Ann Bowland of Chester Spr 

22 Hanna Croswell of Livrp Spr 

M' 5 Thomas Hughes of Walton [ ]withems 



24: 


4 


24: 


4 


16: 


O 


24: 


4 


20: 


4 


22: 


4 


15: 


5 



To m' William Par fc 

age years 

July 15. 1704 Marth' Wilson of Macclesfield in Cheshire Spinst 21 : 5 

Aug 1 1. 1704 Jane Richson of Workington in Cumberland Spinst 25 : 5 

Aug* 10: 1704 Jane Miller of Macclesfield in Chestr Spinst 22 : 5 

10 : 1704 Ralph Langley of Tamouth 100 in Warwyckshire 16 : 4 

10 : 1704 Elizabeth Meakin of Dublin Spins 1 16 : 5 

19 : 1701 Jane Clements of Dublin Spinst 21 : 4 

7b 11 : 1704 Elizabeth Butler daughter to Eliz : Watkinson ) q . i o 

of York Widow g her Mother Consent j 

11. 1704 Eliz : Watkinson herself 27 : 4 



7b. 13 : 1704 To [ ] Blundell Esq ; & sent to his Broth.' 

m.' Rich (l Blundell in Virgin.' and hee went in 
y e Ship w th W m Part. J no Blundell of Crosbie 
Parva 20 



8b. 17: 1704 Jonath' Tapley of Norley in Cheshire Taylor to 

m' Low 22 : 5 

To m : Joseph Parr. 



9b. 16. Eliz : Actin of Tunbridg Spinstr (in Kent 18 : 4 



To m' : J no Lancst' 
16 : 9b. 1704 Richard Berrey of Dalton in Lancashire 16 



"» Tanworth. 



1911] Emigrants to America from Liverpool 167 

20 : 9b. 1704 To m' : Thorn' : Leekenber 

Thorn: Dickinson of or near Leeds in Yorkshire 15 : 6 



to m' J no Banister 

age year 

Decemb. 18. 1704 Ann Wainwright of Farnworth 20 : 5 



To m' : Ezekiel Parr 

Decemb r 20. 1704 Mary Woolley of Bishops Castle in Shropshire 26 : 4 
ead die Kath' Woodier of Rigat in Surrey 24 : 4 



To m' AY m Williamson for acc fc of m\ Johnson 

xb. 27. 1704 Mary Mills of Leeke 101 in Shropshire 16 : 4 

ead Die Grace Robinson of Heptonstall in Yorkshire 21 : 4 



To Ald m : John Cockshutte 

xb. 28. 1704 Hannah Bridg of Manchester Spinster 20 : 4 

30 : Kath Arch- Deacon of Bramhall town in y e County 

of Kilkenny In' Ireland Sp. 19 : 4 



To Ald m : Rich d Houghton 
xb. 30. 1704 J n0 Bonns of Oustan in y e County of Lincoln Taylor 



To ra' : Thomas Williamson age 

Janu: 5. 1704 Roger Finch of Standish House 102 Carpenter 45 : 4 

ead die W" 1 Finch of y e same and son to Roger Finch 16 : 7 



To m r : Randle Piatt. 
Thomas Taylor of Liverpoole 14 : 7 



To m' J no Wright 
April 27. 1705 J n0 Aspinwall son of Henry Aspinwall of Ashton 

in y e County of Lancast to S : xprnos 103 or any age time 
other of y e Char'ybbee Islands 17 4 



To m' : Edward Rochdale 
Ap. 27. 1705 Eliz : Parker Daughter of Thomas Parker late 

Bolton in Yorkshire 20-5 

May 1. 1705 Hannah Hewitte of Heplinsdale in Yorkshire 

spinster 21-4 

ead die Ann Booth 104 of Bradford in Yorkshire spinster 1G - 4 

ead die Mary Hey wood of Great Newton in Staffordshire 18 - 5 

101 Lake. 

102 Is this Standish Hall in the parish of Standish ? 

103 St. Christopher. 

104 At Bradford: Ann, dau. of James Booth of Ileaton, hapt. 29 Dec. 1089. Ann, 
dau. of James Booth of Shipley, bapt. 30 Dec. 1089. James Booth and Ann Pollard 
m. 7 Feb. 1088-9. 

VOL. LXV. 12 



168 Emigrants to America from Liverpool [April 

May 22. 1705 Ellen Holme 105 of Manchester in y e County of 

Lane Spinst 19 - 4 
June 1 : 1705 Mary Cooper of Prescott in y e County of Lane 

Spinst 17-6 

5 : Jane Stewart of y e City of London Spins* 14 : 6 

14 Ellen Croston of Westhoughton in y e County of 

Lane Spins* 17 - 5 

18 : Isabel Jones of Rigland 106 in Wales Spinst r 25 : 4 

20 : Roger Son of Roger Prestidge of Manchs* in y e 

County of Lane 15 : 7 

21 : Thomas Hough of Middle Hilton 107 in y e County 

of Lane 14-7 

27 : Kath' : Langdon of Whittle in y e County of Lane 21 - 5 

July 3 : Ann Brown of Leland in Lancashire 21 - 5 

3 : Mary Heap of Blackbourne in Lancashire 21 - 5 



To m' : Joseph Preem 
7b. 1 1 Mary Thornton of y e Parish of Stoke in Cheshire 

Spins' 17-6 

7b. 11 James Brown of Sheilds in Northumberland 17 - 6 

7b. 8 Joannah Meredith of Much-wenlock in Shrop- 

shire Spn 21 - 5 

7b. 8 J n0 Hughes of Langadwin in Montgomeryshire in 

Wales 14-7 



To m' : Henry Smith to y e Charybbee Islands Virgin' or Maryland. 
9b. 3. 1705 Thomas Mere of Hulton in y e County of Lancas r 

husbandm' 5 -16 



To m' : Edward Tarleton j r 
9b. 27. 1705 W m Smethurst at Hilton 108 of Middleton in y e ^ 

County of Lancas* & Son of Andrew Hilton >• 14- 7 

Husbandm y 

9b. 29. 1705 Jane y e Daughter of Henry Ellison of West Derby 

husban' 17-5 

xb. 8. 1705 To M' : J n0 Marsden Edwd Ashton of Winwyck 

Parish 21- 4 

xb. 10. 1705 To M' W m Tarleton Thomas Whalley of Middleton 15- 7 



To Thomas Fawsette 
xb. 6. 1705 Lawrence Cockshutte of Ecclesell in Lancashire 

Fustian Weaver 20-5 



105 Ellen, dau. of John Hulme, Shrewfold, bapt. 26 Dec. 1684 at Didsbury, in the 
parish of Manchester. 

io« Raglan. 

»<" Middle Hulton. 

106 Andrew Hilton of Middleton had eleven children b, betw. 1668 and 1689, when 
there is a break in the records until 1695. Ho was bur. 25 Feb. 1696-7. This emigrant 
was 1). abt. 1691. He may have been a son, legitimate or illegitimate, of the above. 
Andrew, son of William Hilton, bapt. 6 Aug. 1643 at Middleton. 



1911] Emigrants to America from Liverpool 169 

To m' Henry Schofield in Potomock in Maryland Age Years 
9b. 21. 1705 Jno Lucas of Eccles in Lancash' Webster 17 : 5 

28 Thorn' : Hayes of Huddersfield in Yorkshire Chandl r 30 : 4 



To m' J no Smalwood 

9b. 9. 1705 J n Millard in Wedgberry 109 in Staffordshr Nailr 14 : 7 
8: George Lord of Tatnell 110 in Cheshire White 

Cooper 30 : 4 

6 : J no Bradburd of Bradley near Frodsh' in Chesh' 22 : 5 

7b. 3 J no Walmesley of Lievsay in Lancast' husband' 13 : 7 

was returnd' 3 Saml Berrey of Aston in Cheshire Husband 13 : 7 

18 Francis Vandery of Colchestr' in Essex husb' 18 : 6 

18 J no Bricknell of Colches' hus' 20 : 6 

18 J no Bow of Colches 1 husb' 19 : 6 

3 Thorn' : Chaddock of Pendleton Pole husband 12 : 7 



Jan r 4 



To m'. J n0 Marsden, but m' : Smalwood pays for ) 1 . ^ 
them. Jonathan Heendrey of Eccls Parish j 



1705 Memo. That when M r Thomas Preeson went in y e ship called 
y e Augustine but now called y e Thomas and Elizabeth, hee 
ow d me for drawing the 4 Lad Indentures ; and three shil- 
lings six pence besides. 



To m'. J no Wright 
Jan'. 4. 1705 W m Roberts of Beau mam-is Shoomaker p d 21-4 



To m'. Matthias Gibson 
Jan'. 4. 1705 J n0 Taylor of Bedford in y e County of Lancst 

Agd. p d 16-5 



To m'. J n Crane 22 d 9 b 1705 
James Woods of Derby in Derbyshire aged — to 

be allowed on Ace 1 12-9 



To m'. Ralph W rn son Jan 4. 1705 

Ellen Roberts near Plolywell Spins* 19-4 

Ann AYliiUicre near Clitherou 21-4 

Eliz : Dene [of J Great Sankey 27-4 



Jan r 19. 1705 John Hougland of Kelson 111 in Cheshire to m r J n0 

Periesel for Virgin or y e Chary bben 16 : 5 



To m'. Hugh Patt<'ii A^e Years 

JamV 22* 1705 Jacob Jackim of Hanghton in y e County of Chester 15 - 8 
Jan*. 22. 17(X5 Adam Mosley of Mackelesfield Forrist in Cheshire 15-8 



» M Wednesbury( ?). 
,,0 Tattenhall. 
m Kelsall( ?). 



170 Emigrants to America from Liverpool [AP^il 

To M r John Percivall Febr 2 : 1705 
Febuy y e 21* Rob fc Harrison 112 of Bretherton in Lane aged about Fifteene 

yeares to serve in y e : Plantations for Seaven Yeares 



Feb: 2: 1705 

To M r Thomas Amery Ellen Low of Hay near Wigan aged 
about sixteene yeares to serve in Virginea or Maryland 
seaven Yeares p d 
March 6 1705/6 Margtt Cholmondeley of Coat Cales in Lansh' p d ag d 20 7 

yeares 



Feb: y e 5 : 1705 
To M r William Oliver, Elizabeth Brookes of Bridgwater in 
Somersetshire aged about Thirty Y r eares to serve in Vir- 
ginea or Maryland for Fowr Yeares p d 



Ditto Die 
To W m Oliver Sarah Needham of Buxton in Darbishire aged 
about 19 Yeares to Serve in Virginea or Maryland for 4 
Yeares. 



To M r Lancaster Age Time 

of 
Service 
Yeares 



Feb. Elizab Stanley of Leverpoole Spinst aged 26-7 
1705 Mary Winstanley 113 of Upholland in y e : Co : Lane' 17-5 

Elizabeth Yeoman of Anglesey in Wales 20-5 

Alice Crompton of Freckeleton in Lane' 25-5 

Elizabeth Fauster of Samsberry 114 in Lane' 21-5 

Mary Greenhalgh of Chorley in Lane' 15-5 

Ann Greenhalgh of Chorley in Lane' 20-5 

Ellen Bradshaw 115 of upholland in Lane' 14-7 

Annas Liniare of Leverpoole in Lane' 30-4 

Ellen Leed of Sawick 116 in Lancashire 26-5 

Jane Vexon of Houghton in Lane 16-5 

Sarah Reed of Wrixham in Wales 20-5 

John M ck Gee of Scotland 15-5 



Margaret Griffith aged about Eleven years of Carnarvonshire 
to serve 7 Yeares to M r Lancaster or Assignes 



To M r Ralph Williamson Age yeares 

of 
Service 

112 Robert Harrison, " son of a Beggar Woman," bapt. 17 Apr. 1692 at Croston, part 
of which parish was Bretherton. 

na At Upholland, parish of Wigan : Mary, dan. of Ja*mes Winstanley of Winstanley, 
bapt. 23 Dec. 1684. Mary, dau. of John Winstanley of Orrall, bapt. 11 Jan. 1690. John, 
8. of John Winstanly of Orrell, bapt. 1 May 1664. 

114 Samlesbury. 

115 Eline, dau. of John Bradshaw of Upholland, Senior, bapt. 16 July 1692 at Uphol- 
land. 

116 Salwick. 



1911] 



Emigrants to America from Liverpool 



171 



February \ Ann Cuquith of prescot in Lancashire 
1705 j Dorithy Davies of Denby in "Wales 



22 

20 



4 
4 



To M r Edward Tarleton 
February 1705 ( Ralph Banckes of Bold in Lancashire 

< Robert Evans and Ann his wife of Dodleston 
( Cheshire 
March 6 1705/6 Georg Robinson of Astick in Yorkshire 
6 Thorn' Hill of Hollingworth in Lancash 

2 1 W m Fallar of or near Chedel in Cheshir 

23 Ralph Collier of Rochdale Cloathworker 



14-7 



13 
16 
17 
25 



4 
6 
7 
5 
4 



March 23. 

1705/6 
ead die 
ead die 



To m' Tho : Dutton Narrgat' 



Jane Piatt of Sropenhall 117 in y e : County of Chestr 

Singlewoman 18 

Martha Piatt of y e : same place Single' 14 

James Piatt of y e : same 12 



April 6. 1706 Eleoner Holford of Croton in Cheshire 



15 - 



7 
8 
9 
6 



February ) 
1705 j 



To m r Parr and Worthington 

Ellen Sedden 

Robert Benson 

Mich 1 Hogg 

Alex Orrell 

Alice Steele 

Alice Monding 

Ann Chandler 

Ellen Pierson 

Mary Worrall 



mem'd Sarah Mere 



To M r Jn° Lancaster Ann Cooke of Wales aged about 18 
yeares to serve 5 years. 



February ) 
1705 | 



To M r Ezekiel Parr 



Margaret Tongue of Manchester Spinster 
Ellen Taylor of Mchester 
Margtte Roberts of Merionetshire in Wales 
Mary Thornton of Stanney in Cheshire 
Prudence Smalwood of Malpus in Cheshire 



age Time 
of 
Service 
years 

19-5 
19-5 
5 
18-5 
20-5 



11 



To m' Tho : Williamson Merch* 
March 26. 1706 Roger y e son of James Rigby of Heay in y 

CouDty of Lan' 
March 26. 1706 To m r : J n0 Smalwood w' : goes in y e : J n0 & 

Thomas) W m Sharpies 118 of Lealand in y e : ! 

County of Lancst Taylor 



8 
4 



117 Plainly so in the original, hut prohahly meant for Gropenhall. 

118 At Leyland : William, s. of Roger Sharpies of Leyland, bapt. 30 Nov. 1679. Roger 
Sharpies and Anne Fareclough, both of Leyland, m. 18 Dec. 1677. 



172 Emigrants to America from Liverpool [April 

March 28. 1706 to m' Thorn' Williamson 

Jonath' Delnow of Trafford in y e County of 

Chester pd 11-9 



To m' W m Everard 
April l 1 1706 Tho : Edge Son of Thorn' : Edge of Milton Green 

in Cheshire pd 16-7 



To m' Georg Battersly 
April 12. 1706 Thorn' : Brown of Mansfield in Nottingham- 
shire pd 15-7 



To Cap 1 Tarlet 
April 15. 1706 W m Lucas of Worseley in Eccls Parish in Ches- 
hire pd 19 : 4 



To m' J no Tunstall 
April 18. 1706 Elizabeth Brining of Samsbery 119 in Lancashir 17 : 7 

Ann Harrison of Frodsham in Cheshire 18 : 7 

W m Robinson of Wimerley 120 near Garston in 



Lacast 17 

Apr'. 22. 1706 Rich d Glouer 22 

April 27. 1706 Mary Greaues of Halton in Cheshr Singlewoman 27 

Ann Whalley of Broughton in Lane. 23 

Ann Kerchin of Scazbricke 26 

29. 1706 Ellen Fisher of Wrightlington 18 



7 
7 
7 
7 
7 
7 



,ra 



To Thomas Johnson Esq r : for y e use of y e Own 1 
June 21. 1706 of Richard Rogerson of Bunbery in Cheshire age Time 

pd 18 07 



To m' Thorn' Woodward 
July 20 th 1706 Ambrose Wynne of Mould in Flintshire 20 : 06 



To m' : Gilbert Lievsay, g Cap* Edward Rochdale 
July 16 Thomas Jackson of Millam in y e : County of Cum- 

berland Taylo' 18 : 04 

Aug 1 3 Jane Lievsay of Samsbury 121 in y e : County of 

Lanes 1 Spins 1 20 : 05 

6. Mary Taylor of Burnley in y e : County of Lancs r 

Spinst r 17: 05 

8. Jane Williams of Denbigh in Wales 29 : 04 

7b. 9. Elizabeth Willson of Ellell in y e County of 

Lancastr Spinst r 19 : 05 

16. Rowland Evans of Lang Gelly 122 in Wales Age 12 : 07 

8b. 3. Ellis Davies of Reabban 123 near Wrexham in Wales 20: 04 

119 Samlesbury. 
no Wimbersley. 
121 Samlesbury. 
l2a Llangwyllog. 
123 Ruabon. 



1911] Emigrants to America from Liverpool 173 

8. Eliz : Eccleston of Polton in Lancashire Spinst r 20 : 05 
14: Joannah Meredith of Much Wootton in Shrop- 
shire Single worn' 22 : 05 
15. J no Jordan of Sheffield in Yorkshire pd 15 ; 08 



To Cap 1 J n0 Wright for Virgin', Maryland, or any of 

y e Charybbee Islands age yeares 

December 9 1706 Tho : English of Cresleton 12 * in Cheshire 14 7 



To m' : Andrew Moore or Manchs 1 Jan'. 25. 1706 

William Dale son of James Dale Late of Manches* Age Yeares 

Tavlor 15 5 

Tho fMorley Son of W m Morley late of Walden 

in Kent Brickmk r 16-5 

John Heyes Son of George Heyes of Manchester 

Schoole Mast r January y e 28 th 1706 p d 15-5 



To M r Thomas Hughs of Liverpoole Jan r 28 1706 
Roger Ellors of Rochdale a father and Mother- 
less Child 14-7 
John Walker of Cockerham, a Fatherless Chiide 12-9 
John Grene of [ ] 14-7 
Margaret Jones of Holiwell in Flintshire 16-7 
These 4 Serv fc were bound £ Ad m J n0 Clievelands order to 
m' : Thomas Hughes and the charg s . (being Twenty shil- 
lings) place d to s d Ald m . Clievelands Ace 1 : 



21. xb: Margtte Smith of Lowton 16-5 

21 ib: Mary Brown of Langtdn 19-5 



To m' : Thomas Williamson Merch' Febr: 4: 1706 
Rebeccah Shaw 126 of Macclesfield in y e County of 

Chest r 20-5 

Aarron Thornley 126 of Macclesfield p' 15-6 



To m' Georg Tyrer Janu'. 4. 1706. Rob* Dixon of 

Ulfall 127 in Cumberland 16-7 



Feb. 12. 1706 Thomas Wild of Polton Taylor 20-5 

12 : 1706 Gilbert Periew 1 Son of James Periew 1 of Lymme 

Cheshire 15-7 



Tom': J n0 Molyneux Merch 1 Edmund Atherton 

of Bolton Smith 20 : 4 



i 24 Christlcton. 

155 At Macclesfield : Rebecca, dau. of Edward Shaw of Crooked yard, bapt. 11 Mar. 
1671-2. Rebecca, dau. of Samuel Shaw of Macclesfield Forest, bapt. 7 May 1672. 
128 Aai-on, son of John Thornley of Macclesfield, bapt. 6 May 1691. 
^Ulpha. J 



174 Genealogical Research in England [April 

Feb. 21 8t 170G M r Andrew More of Manchester 
Mary Williamson Daughter of Sam 11 Williamson 

late of Manceser 15-6 



Feb. 27. 1706 

To m' Thomas Preem Rather' Robinson of 

Wrexham Denby shire 20-5 

Martha Lloy d of Wrexham p d 20-5 

March 17. 1706/7 To m' : Anth* Booth J n0 Davies of Wrexham 

in Denbyshire but to serve in a sloop or to 
y e : Charybbees 17-5 

W m Robinson Son of Tho : Robinson late of 

Dunfreeze in Scotl' 18-5 

Henry Wainwright Taylor Son of J n0 Wain- 

wright late of Rainhill p d 18-4 



March 21. 1706/7 to m Georg Dnddell, W m Leatherland of Sut- 
ton Weaver 20-7 

Alice Leech 128 



GENEALOGICAL RESEARCH IN ENGLAND 

Transcribed by Miss Elizabeth French, and communicated by the Committee on 

English Research 

[Continued from page 75] 

The Will of Alicia Igolynden, late wife of Richard Igolynden of By- 
denden in the County of Kent, dated at Bydenden, April 1475. My body 
to be buried in the churchyard of Bydynden. To the high altar of the 
church of Bydynden for my tythes and oblations forgotten, 8d. To every 
brotherhood light of which I am a sister, 2d. To son Thomas Igolynden. 
To lore Gesse. To daughter Agnes Igolynden a large iron pot on condi- 
tion that she pay to Thomas her brother 6s. 8d. To daughter Juliane all 
my money and a cow which is in the hands of Robert lanys, etc. To 
Thomasine Hardy. To son Thomas. Toward the expenses of my burial 
13s. 4d. To my days mind 13s. 4d. To son John. The residue to daugh- 
ter Agnes, and of this my will I make Adam Pellond and John Igolynden 
my executors. I make John lechynden and William Gebon my feofees of 
eight crofts of land and woods containing nine acres in Bedynden on the 
den of Beckynden, they to legally deliver them to my son John Igolynden 
on condition that he pay all my legacies following : to a priest to celebrate 
mass in the church of Bydenden for one year, 30s. 4d., to the footway in 
Crouchfeild two cartloads of stone, to Juliane my daughter 20d., to the 
Northrodeloft in the said church 16d.. and to every one of my godsons and 
goddaughters 4d. Proved 9 May 1475 by John Igolynden, one of the ex- 
ecutors named, with power reserved for the other executor. (Archdea- 
conry of Canterbury, vol. 2, fo. 17, translated from the Latin.) 

128 Tin's entry, with the first name crossed out, is at the extreme lower edge of the 
page, and is the final entry. 



1911] Genealogical Research in England 175 

The Will of William Igolynden of Bidynden, dated the Feast of St. 
George, [23 April] 1474. My body to be buried in the churchyard of 
Bidynden. To the high altar of the church of Bidynden 8d. All the rest 
of my goods to my brothers Thomas Igolynden and John Igolynden, whom 
I make my executors. I make Robert Hamon and Richard morelyn my 
feofees of all my lands and tenements in the parish of Bidynden on the den 
of Brykynden, they to legally deliver the same to my mother Alice Igo- 
lynden on condition that she deliver all her right in two pieces of land in 
parish and den aforesaid, called machetrede and le marlyng, which 1 give 
to my brothers Thomas and John and to their heirs forever, on condi- 
tion that they pay to my feofees 9 marks as follows : 40s. at my months 
mind, 40s. at my years mind, and half a year thereafter 40s. more. If they 
refuse, then the aforesaid two pieces of land to be sold and the money to be 
given as follows : 13s. 4d. to the church of Bidynden ; for a priest to cele- 
brate in the said church for a quarter of a year, 33s. 4d. ; a cartload of 
stone for the bad road at Dastecrosse, and two cartloads between my man- 
sion house and the mansion house of Walter Brekynden. The residue of 
the 9 marks to be spent about my burial, my months mind, my years mind 
and paying my debts. After the decease of my mother I give to my sister 
Agnes Igolynden a croft of land, called the croft before the gate, in fee 
simple, and all my other lands and tenements to Thomas and John my broth- 
ers, their heirs and assigns, on condition that they pay to Thomas Elsy 3s. 
4d., to the three daughters of Robert Haslynden 2s., and to Robert Sesse 
3s. 4d. Proved 9 September 1474 by the executors named in the will. 
(Archdeaconry of Canterbury, vol. 2, fo. 15, translated from the Latin.) 

The Will of Agnes Igolynden, daughter of Richard Igolynden of 
Bedynden, 2 February 1480 [-7]. To be buried in the churchyard of Be- 
dynden. To the high altar of the church of Bedynden, the chapel, lights, 
and for masses. To the footway between Brekyndennyscrosse and Hacch- 
manys stile, for stone, 26s. 8d. To the foot way between two pieces 
of land called Sevenaker and Stalefield, in stone, 20s. To one hundred 
masses to be said for the health of my soul by the friars of Canterbury, 8s. 
6d. To Richard, prior of Lossenham, 12d. To the children of Thomas 
Igolynden my brother, 40s. to be divided among them, but if all die before 
lawful age, then the said 40s. to my said brother Thomas Igolynden. To 
the poor inhabitants of the parish of Bedynden 20s. To Johane Sampcok 
20d. To sister Juliane Igolynden all those sums which she owes me, she 
to pay to the aforesaid Johane wife of William Sprynget \_sic~\ 2s. To 
lore, wife of John Sease. To Steven Herynden. The residue of my goods 
to John lechynden and Juliane Igolynden to dispose of for the health of 
my soul, etc., and I make them my executors. Lawrence at-hill, John 
lechynden, Adam Pelond, and Richard Morleyn to be my feofees of my 
land in Bidynden on the den of Brekynden and Petynden to be sold and 
the money to be used for the execution of my testament. Proved 20 May 
1477 by the executors named. (Archdeaconry of Canterbury, vol. 3, fo. 4.) 

The Will of Thomas Igylnden of Fretinden in the Countie of Kent, 
10 December 1497. To be buried in the churchyard of Fretynden. To 
the high altar there, etc., 8d. To the mother church 2d. The residue to 
my wife Johane, whom I make my executrix. Stephen Payne to be super- 
visor. Lands and tenements in Frittenden, and two acres of woodland in 
Biddenden to wife for life, she to pay a debt to Stephen Payne and James 
Everynden. To son John all my other lands and tenements in Biddenden 



176 Genealogical Research in England [April 

in fee simple, and if he outlive the said Johan, the two acres of woodland 
and the messuage at Stokebregge, he paying to my daughter Kateryn 33s. 
4d. and to my other daughter, Isabell, 26s. 8d., and to be charged with no 
other money " axed " by the said Isabell. If John die before Johane, then 
son Thomas to have the messuage at Stokebregge after the death of the 
said Johane Payne [s/c],* he paying the said sums to my daughters. If 
both sons die before my wife, property to be sold and out of it the lega- 
cies paid to my daughters, and of the remainder one half to go to the chil- 
dren of my son John, and the other half to the church of Frittenden for 
masses. Land called the Reche to be sold to pay my debts. Son Thomas, 
after the death of my wife, to have eight acres of land upon the denne of 
Bukherst in fee simple. If he die without lawful issue, reversion to son 
John. Proved 29 May 1500 by the executrix. ( Archdeaconry of Canter- 
bury, vol. 7, fo. 2.) 

The Will of Johane Igolynden, widow of Thomas Igolynden of Freth- 
inden, 1 September 1498. To be buried in the churchyard of Frethinden. 
To the high altar there, for lights, etc. To Juliane, daughter of Johane 
[sic, probably John] Iglynden, my goddaughter, and to each of my other 
godchildren. Son Thomas Iglynden to have my two messuages, two 
pieces of garden, and three pieces of land called knocks, lying within a 
land called Cotvngs lane, to him and his assigns when he comes to lawful 
age according to the law. If he die before lawful age without lawful issue, 
then all my goods and moveables to my other sons in fee simple. To Ka- 
terne Igleden. To sons Raf and William Bukherst, whom I make execu- 
tors, residue of goods undisposed as was assigned to me by the last will of 
my husband Thomas to fulfill his will, they to have them to fulfill his will 
and pay his debts and bequests and do his will and mine. Stephen Payne 
and Thomas Webbe overseers. Proved 28 May 1511. (Archdeaconry 
of Canterbury, vol. 7, fo. 5.) 

The Will of Thomas Igolynden of Frittenden, 20 July 1526. To 
be buried in the churchyard of Frittenden. To the high altar, etc. To 
be distributed at my outbearing, etc. To son John. The residue of all 
my moveable goods to wife Agnes, whom I make my executrix. Wit- 
nesses : Sir Nicholas Jakson, clerk, William Walys, John Box, pet Cro- 
thynden. I make William Walis, William Barkle, and John Bukhurst 
my feofees of all my land in Frettinden. My wife to take the yearly 
profits of my house garden and two pieces of ground lying in Cotyngham, 
bounding to the high street, during her life according to her jointure. 
Also the profits of two pieces of land containing eight acres for twelve 
years, and after the twelve years to my son John, with provision for his 
decease, etc. To the mending of the highways between bukherst bredge 
and Frittenden church 10 marks, and the residue to be willed by wife 
Agnes during her life time. Proved 11 September 1526 by the executrix 
named. (Archdeaconry of Canterbury, vol. 17, fo. 9.) 

The Will of Thomas Igleden of Smarden in the County of Kent, 
husbandman, 27 March 1563. To be buried in the churchyard of Smerden. 
To brother John. To sister Dowle. To sister Johan Drayner. To James 
Igleden. The residue of all moveable goods to brother John Drayner, 

*It was not unusual in those days for a man to speak of his wife by her maiden 
name. She was evidently born Payne and was a widow Bukherst when she married 
the testator. 



1911] Genealogical Research in England 177 

whom I make executor. All my lands and tenements in Frittenden to 
brother John Igleden for life, and after his death my executor to sell them 
and divide the money equally among the children of said John Igleden, 
each to be the others heir. Witnesses : Robert Baker, John Pell, and 
Thomas Boycott. Proved 26 May 1563 by the executor named. (Arch- 
deaconry of Canterbury, vol. 37, fo. 59.) 

The Will of John Egolynden the Elder, of Bedynden, 18 January 
1511. To be buried in the churchyard of Bedynden. To the high altar 
there, etc. To every godchild 6d. To the high altars of Halden and 
Smerden. A bushel of wheat to be made into penny loaves and dis- 
tributed to the poor people of Biddenden in the churchyard on Good Fri- 
day every year for twenty years. To the brotherhood priest of Bidynden 
6s. 8d. a year for life. To the church of Biddenden. To son John, if he 
will be a priest, £10 to pray for my soul, etc. And if he will be no priest, 
then the said £10 to another priest to pray, etc. To wife Alice half of 
household goods, and the other half to son Richard. The residue [sic'] 
of all goods to son Richard, whom I make sole executor. Stephen Pell, 
clerk of Smerden, overseer, and to him 3s. 4d. Witnesses : John Hilles, 
Walter Bryganden, Gylberd Stedman, and Thomas Ponett. I make John 
Lechvnden, John Elsy, Walter Brykynden of Biddenden, and Richard 
Morelyne of Benynden my feofees. My wife to have either her jointure 
or else her dwelling in my messuage where I dwell, the " soler " on the 
"doyce" side with the Chamber under, sufficient fuel and fire, the little 
. garden at the head of the soler and another little garden at longtown pett, 
and her easement in kitchen and brew house, also one third of my son 
Richard Egolynden's fruit, during her " wedewoth," and an annuity of 20s. 
paid by son Richard during her widowhood, etc. Son Richard to occupy 
and take the profits of the said messuage that I dwell in and the lands called 
" Smersole soo home " [sic] until he come to age of twenty-one, paying the 
charges before rehearsed, and when he come to said age my feofees to de- 
liver said lands and tenements to him and his heirs forever. He also to 
have all my outlands and tenements which I have not willed, paying to 
John P^golynden my son £30, £5 a year for six years out of my outlands, 
that is 28 acres bought of Vincent Munne, land called Goreland, More- 
hams, and Biddennen Meed and luetham. If said Richard refuse to pay 
the said £30, then John to have the said out lands. For twenty years £5 
a year shall be levied out of the land called leuttham to priests clerks and 
poor people to keep an obit in the church of Bedynden. Proved 10 March 
15 1 1-12 by the executor named. (Archdeaconry of Canterbury, vol. 1 1, fo. 7.) 

The Will of Richard Igulden of Bidynden in the County of Kent, 
husbandman, one of the heirs of John Igulden the elder, late of Bidyn- 
den, deceased, 3 October 1518. My body to be buried in the churchyard 
of Bidynden. To the high altar of the said church and the church of 
High Halden; to lights, etc. ; the friars of Canterbury; for masses, etc. 
£10 to be equally divided between the children now living of my sisters 
Alis, Julyan, and Agnes, and the children of John Igulden my kinsman, 
"onlvner." To the friars of Losenham. To the three houses of friars, 
Austens, Domynyks, and Franncs within Rye and Winchelsey. To the 
poor men that bear my body to the church. To the children now living of 
John Yong, Lawrence Fekyn, and Edmond Baker. To Agnes Sky re and 
Johane Welbe. To John Doggett, Stephen yong, Lawrence Fekyn, and 



178 Genealogical Research in England [April 

Margarett Springate. Four loads of stone to be laid between my gate 
and my cousin John Lachenden's barn, and 40s. to the laying of it. One 
load of stone between the church gate and the church door of Bidynden. 
To said church. To each of my godchildren. To wife Johane all my 
household stuff and 10 marks in cattle, etc., to discharge my bond of Gore- 
lands. The residue of all goods to the making of a chapel of our lady 
within the churchyard of Bidynden. Wife and Thomas Castell executors. 
My brother John Igulden to be overseer. To my daughter Johane Igulden 
at her day of marriage, or age of twenty-two years whether she be married 
or no, £10. A like provision made for my daughter that may be hereafter 
born. I make William Scott, Thomas Castell, John Burdon, and John Igul- 
den my feofees of all my lands and tenements, woods, water, rights, etc. If 
my wife bear me a son, then she to occupy and take the profits of my prin- 
cipal messuage that I now dwell in, with all the houses, gardens, and nine 
pieces of land called the Long Meded, the oylesmede, the little croft, the new 
housefelde, the Bisshitheke, the Ryshefelde, the frete felde, the little brod- 
felde, Taymet field, containing forty acres and all in Bidynden upon the 
Denne of Bidynden, and my messuage and gardens containing one acre 
upon the Denne of Bidynden called the Northstreet, until the said son 
come to the age of twenty-one years, then my feofees to deliver all the said 
lands and tenements to him. If he die without lawful issue, or if I have 
no son, then my wife to have the profits of the said lands for life, and after 
her death to my brother John Igulden his heirs and assigns forever. The 
residue of all lands unbequeathed to be sold by my executors to perform 
my will, and if sister Agnes Taylor or her son Richard, if he live to years 
of discretion, will buy the land, they to have it at a lower price than any 
other, except one piece of land called Lewetham, lying beside my cousin 
John Iggden's, which I have granted to Thomas Castell for £8. Witnesses : 
John Thrupp, curate of the said parish, Thomas Lachynden, Lawrence 
Fekyn, Walter Breckynde, Robert Burdon, John Burdon, and Henry 
Troute. Proved 15 November 1518 by one of the executors named, the 
relict being dead. (Archdeaconry of Canterbury, vol. 13, fo. 11.) 

The Will of Johane Igulden of Bedynden, widow, late wife of Rich- 
ard Igulden of the said parish, husbandman, 27 October 1518. To be 
buried in the churchyard of Bedynden. To the high altar of the church 
there, of Smerden, and of High Halden. To each godchild. To the 
friars of Canterbury for masses. To sister-in-law Agnes Taylor, and to 
her son Richard Taylor. To Margaret Springate, Agnes Brekynden, and 
Henry Trowle 8d. To brother William Scott, To Johan Welbe, Johane 
Gebon, and to " modre Margarett." To Petyngrewe's widow. To daugh- 
ter Johan Igulden at the age of twenty-one or day of marriage, which shall 
first happen, all the residue of my goods, and if she die before said age 
without lawful issue, then to my brother William Scott and sister-in-law 
Agnes Taylor, provision being made for another child, if any should be 
born. They to be guardians of my daughter Johane and any other child 
I may have, and to be my executors. John Igulden, my husband's broth- 
er, shall stand in my stead as regards my husband's will, if the law will 
admit him thereto. Witnesses : John Thruppe, curate of Bedynden, 
John lachynden, John Igulden, Thomas Castell, Walter Brekynden, and 
Henry Trowte. Proved 15 November 1518 by the executors named. 
(Archdeaconry of Canterbury, vol. 13, fol. 11.) 



1911] Genealogical Research in England 179 

The Will of John Iggleden of Shaddockesherst in the County of Kent, 
13 April 1550. My body to be buried in the churchyard of Shadockherst. 
To son Bartholomew Iggleden and to daughter Julyan. To sons Joseph 
and James. To sons John Iggleden of Great Charte and Richard Iggleden 
of Biddenden. To wife Johane. To daughter Alyce. The residue of all 
my movable goods to sons Joseph, John, Bartholomew, and Richard, and 
daughter Julian, equally divided. Sons Bartholomew and Richard to be 
executors. Witnesses : John Wills, William White, Edwarde Harris, gyles 
Knolden, and Sir Edmonde Smythe, Curate, with others. Proved 3 Sep- 
tember 4 Edward VI [1550] by the oaths of Edward Harris and Giles 
Knolden, and probate granted to the executors named. (Archdeaconry of 
Canterbury, vol. 27, fo. 1.) 

The Will of Joseph Igleden of High Halden in the County of Kent, 
tailor, 8 December 1562. To the poor men's box of Halden. My house 
and appurtenances at Biddenden in the weald of Kente to wife Elizabeth 
Igleden in fee simple, in which house now dwelleth Matthew Holland, 
which oweth unto me 35s. for rent. To Joseph Igleden, son of my brother 
Rycharde Igleden of byddenden. Elizabeth, my wife, sole executrix to 
whom all my goods, catties, etc. I make James Sharlake supervisor. Wit- 
nesses : Rycharde Taylowre, Alexander Adames, James Sharlocke, and 
Thomas Grave. Memorandum : that I owe to Julyan my sister 35s. and 
I bequeath to her five more. To Alexander Adams. James Hampton 
oweth me 9s. Sampson of Woodchurch oweth me 2s. Knowlden's widow 
of Shadackeherst oweth me 2s. 4d. Proved 16 March 1562-3 by the 
oaths of Alexander Adams and James Sharlocke, witnesses, probate 
granted to Bartholomew Igleden and Richare Igleden, brothers of the 
deceased, the executrix named in the will being dead. (Archdeaconry of 
Canterbury, vol. 38, fo. 72.) 

The Will of Elizabeth Igclden, widow, of Ilighe Hawlden in the 
County of Kent, 15 February 5 Elizabeth [1562-3]. To the poor men's 
box of Halden. To Alice, wife of Michaell Rychardson of Smarden, 
Alexander Adams' wile, Thomas Rogerst' wife, and Richard Igulden's 
wife, my sister. To Julyan Igleden 5s. which her brother gave her. To 
servant Rycharde Pett. To Alexander Adams. The residue of all my 
goods to my brothers Rychard Igleden and Bartholomewe Igleden, whom 
I make executors. Overseers : James Sarelocke, Stephen llucksell, and 
John Igledon. My executors shall let out, take up and receive the yearly 
rents of my house at Beddenden, which Matthew Holland now dwelleth 
in, until it will amount to pay £4 10s. to Norton's heirs, as Norton's will 
doth appear, and 10s. given to the poor men's box, as given by Norton, 
and 20s. to Josephe Igleden, Rycharde; Igleden's son. If John Moyes of 
Biddenden can come by his £10 of Mr. Pery, so that my executors may 
be discharged of it, then I give £10 to John Moyse of Biddenden. If not, 
the said £10 to the said John Moyse, James Sharlocke, .Stephen hinckshell, 
and John Igleden to sell the said house and of the money received to pay 
to my brother Edmonde Saker £20. To my brother John Saker 40s. which 
I owe him, and to John Igleden of Biddenden £10. The residue to Rych- 
ard Igleden and Bartholomewe Igleden, equally divided. Witnesses: 
James Sharelocke and Alyxander Adams. Proved 16 March 1562-3 by 
the executors named. (Archdeaconry of Canterbury, vol. 37, fo. 7 J.) 



180 Genealogical Research in England [April 

The last Testament of William Igulden of Biddenden in the Countie 
of Kent, 29 April 1557. To the poor people of Biddenden at my " owt 
bearing." To Lectice my wife, my bed, etc. My plate shall be equally 
divided among my wife and my three children, John Igulden, Margaret 
Igulden, and Stephen Igulden. To kinswoman Alice Iggulden 6s. 8d., 
etc. To Joane Hope, the wife of Richard Hope of Halden, my kinswo- 
man. To daughter Margaret. To my sister Elizabeth Lewes. To my 
kinswoman Margaret Monnck. To Gervice Hubbomd \_sic~] my "ser- 
vice," 3s. 4d. To my kinsman Richard Monnck if his brother or some 
other honest man will take him and discharge my wife and my son of 
him. All the residue of my movable stuff to be equally divided between 
son John and Lectice my wife, he to be sole executor. John Moyse to be 
overseer. 

The. last will of William Igulden. To Lectice, my wife, an annuity 
of 8 marks to be levied on my messuage and all of my lands and tenements 
called Pettenden lands, late John Stace's, my wife's father, containing forty 
acres and out of my three pieces of land upon the den of pettend, one 
called Newland Croft, and the other called morehams, containing eight 
acres, on condition that the said Lectice do forsake her dowry and all her 
jointure made to her before our marriage ; also all the new house where I 
now dwell for the time that she is widow and no longer, that is to say, the 
parlor, the little entry, the little chamber, and one little chamber called the 
old buttery adjoining, the loft chamber over the said parlor and the stair 
chamber, with the garret over the chambers and the ' k erber " between the 
new room and the street with the young garden next adjoining to them 
and room in the bakehouse to make a fire to brew and to bake in the said 
oven and to grind her malt at the quorne* and to fetch water, etc. One 
cow to be kept upon the ground all the time that she is widow, and if the 
cow be " naughtelie " kept then my said wife shall have three pieces of 
land to my principal messuage adjoining called the hardle croft, long neck, 
and the pasture croft to keep her cow. If my wife marry again, she to 
have no more to do in my new house, " erber " garden or keeping of her 
cow there, but then I will her the annual rent of 26s. 8d. a year for life, 
with penalty for non-payment by the executor. My old house with the 
rest of my other housing thereto belonging and the rent of my lands not 
willed lying upon the dens of Iden, dashmonden, and brickenden, with my 
three shops in Buddenden street, with my woodland at castleden's cross, 
my " owtelayne," my owtelayne at newe crouche, to be had to my son John 
Igulden and to his heirs forever. To James my son, unlawfully born, an 
annuity of 26s. 8d., during his natural life, out of three pieces of land lying 
on the den of pellenden, two of them late bought of Thomas Harlakenden 
and Richard harlackenden his brother, and the other late bought of old 
Thomas harlackenden of halden, to be paid half yearly to the said James, 
with penalty, etc. To daughter Margaret Igulden £20 to be paid at her 
day of marriage or age of twenty years, the most part of it to be raised out 
of my woods growing upon my ground at pettenden. To son Stephen 
Igulden and his heirs forever all my lands lying upon the den of Pettenden 
after the decease of his mother. If she depart this life before my son 
Stephen doth come to the age of two and twenty years, then John Moyse, 
if he bo alive, or if he be dead his son Robert Moyse, shall receive the 
said profits until the said Stephen shall come to the said age. Witnesses: 
John Moyce, John Lede, Richard hope, and Robte dogett. Proved 17 

* A mill. 



1911] Genealogical Research in England 181 

May 1557 on the testimony of John Moyce and John Lede, and commis- 
sion issued to the executor named in the will. (Archdeaconry of Canter- 
bury, vol. 30, fo. 3.) 

The Will of John Iggulden the Elder of the parish of Biddenden 
in the County of Kent, yeoman, 20 December 9 James I [1611-12]. To 
sons John Iggulden of Biddenden and William Iggulden. To Elizabeth 
and John Syinons, my daughters children. 

This is my last will as touching my lands and goods in Bennenden at 
the out lane in New Crouch cantaining two acres, I will it to John Iggulden, 
my son, and his heirs forever in fee simple, and all such evidences writings 
and other rights belonging to me not before given, and I make him my 
sole executor. Witnesses : Richard Allard and John Ramsden. Proved 
5 June 1614 [sic. ; 1612 in Probate Act Book] by John Iggulden, son 
and executor named in the will. (Archdeaconry of Canterbury, vol. 61, 
fo. 117.) 

The Will of John Iggleden the Elder of Biddenden in the Countie of 
Kent, yeoman, 6 April 1613. My body to be buried in the churchyard of 
Biddenden. To the poor of Biddenden. To the mending of the highways 
of Biddenden. To the reparation of the church of Biddenden. To John 
Symons, son of Nicholas Symons late of Woodchurch in the County of 
Kent, deceased. To Elizabeth Symons, my sister's daughter, annuity of 
40s. from my messuage, tenements and other lands in Biddenden, payable 
half yearly in the church porch of Biddenden. To son-in-law Thomas 
Bishop. To every of my daughters-in-law except Bridget Bishop, and to 
brother Bishop of Buttell and my sister, his wife. To brother William Ig- 
gleden. To son-in-law William Bishopp and his heirs all my messuage 
and tenements in Biddenden, and all my lands, tenements, and hereditaments 
in Biddenden and Bennenden toward the payment of such sums of money 
as I owe to Thomas Bishopp, my son-in-law, upon his account, etc., and I 
make the said William* Bishopp executor. [Signed] John Iggleden. Wit- 
nesses: Richard Bishopp, Richard Ballard, and John Bishopp. Proved 11 
March 1613-14 by William Bishop, the executor named in the will. " 27 
August! 1 627 This will was layd up amongst the Commissions and soe 
neuer registered before in its due place." (Archdeaconry of Canterbury, 
vol. 66, fo. 35.) 

The Will of Stephen Iggleden of the parish of Biddenden in the 
Countio of Kent, " Clotheir," 18 February 1605. My body to be buried 
in the church or churchyard of Biddenden. To the poor of the parish of 
Biddenden. To wife Dennice the use of the new building adjoined to 
"my Man-ion housery," the new kitchen and the loft over it with the gar- 
ret and tin- garret over tin- parlor, with three butteries and loft over them, 
with free liberty into and out of all the said rooms and also into the ilar- 
dlefeild, and the use of my oven and furnace during the time of her wid- 
owhood. Also an annuity of £1, whereof 1 marks are due onto her by 
virtm- of a jointure which I made with her before her marriage unto mo, to 
be paid at the four usual feasts of the year out of the profits of my land 
adjoining to my said Mansion House where I now dwell. If the said sum 
i- not paid, my wife to enter into tie- -aid land until the sum be fully satis- 
fied. Also I give unto my wife £25, household furniture, etc, lo bod 
James £20 al twenty-one, if he -hall make ■•! sufficient release of one hoi, 
and the land thereto belonging, to William Cliff* ording to an Indenture 



182 Genealogical Research in England [April 

made between me and the said William Cliffe, and if he refuse, then this 
request to be void. To son Richard £100 at twenty-one. To daughter 
Margaret. 

This is my last will and testament concerning my lands and tenements. 
To son John and his heirs forever all my lands and tenements now in my 
tenure and occupation, and which I lately purchased of John Moyse and 
Symon Moyse, provided that he pay out of them to Dennice, my wife, £8 
yearly toward the education and bringing up of my daughters Dennice and 
Margarett until they come to the age of sixteen years, and afterward 80s. 
yearly until they come to the age of twenty years, if they live so long unmar- 
ried, with penalty for non-payment. Son Stephen to serve in case of my 
wife Dennice's decease. Son John to pay to my daughter Dennice £80 at 
her age of twenty years or day of marriage. If the said sum be unpaid for 
three months after it becomes due, she to have forever three pieces of land con- 
taining seven acres, which lie furthest from my mansion house, abutting and 
adjoining to the King's highway towards the north, to the lands of Francis 
Fowle towards the south, to the lands of Robert Moyse and me Stephen 
Iggleden before given to John leden towards the east. Similar provision 
for daughter Margaret at her age of twenty years or day of marriage. If 
the said sum be unpaid for three months after it be due, my daughter Mar- 
garet to have forever two pieces of land containing seven acres, one called 
the Maxenfeild and the other the Middlefeild, lying together, abutting to 
the lands of Robert Moyse and other the lands of the said Stephen Iggle- 
den before willed to his son John towards the east, and to the lands of the ' 
said Stejmen Iggleden before willed to his son John on the north and west, 
and to the lands of Francis Foule towards the south. To son Stephen 
Ivgleden all those my houses and buildings with all the lands thereto be- 
longing which I lately purchased of Stephen Bateman, lying in the parish 
of Biddenden and Tenterden, to him and his heirs forever, provided that 
he pay out of the lands £5 yearly to Dennice, my wife, toward the educa- 
tion and bringing up of my son Joseph Iggleden until he come to the age 
of fourteen years, and afterward £3 yearly until he come to the age of 
eighteen, with penalty, etc., and provision for son John serving in case of 
wife's decease. Son Stephen to pay £100 to my son Joseph at the age of 
twenty-one, and if it be unpaid for three months after it be due, the lands 
in the parish of Tenterden, being parcell of the lands before willed to my 
son Stephen. If Dennice my wife be with child, whether man child or 
woman child, my executors to pay £5 a year towards its education and 
bringing up until it accomplish the age of fifteen years, etc. All the resi- 
due of my goods and chattels to my sons John and Stephen, whom I make 
sole executors. [Signed] Stephen Iggleden. Witnesses : Josias Seyliard, 
John Iggleden, James Prichard, scrivener, the marke of Stephen Osmore. 
Proved [22 April 1606, Probate Act Book] by John and Stephen Iggle- 
den, executors named. Inventory £676 15s. 2d. Sentence for the con- 
firmation of the will was given 17 June 1606. (Consistory of Canterbury, 
vol. 39, fo. 343.) 

The Will of Stephen Iggleden of Biddenden in the Countie of Kent, 
clothier, 24 October 1624. To my three sonnes, Stephen, John, and 
Thomas, to be payd at twenty-one. To Sarah, Margarett, Suzan, Eliz- 
abeth, and Marie, my five daughters, at twenty years or at their days of 
marriage. Residue to Sarah, my loving wife, in consideration she shall 



1911] Genealogical Research in England 183 

well and truly educate my children and pay all my debts, legacies and 
funeral expenses, and I appoint her sole executrix. 

This is the last will and testament of me Stephen Iggleden touching the 
disposing of that my parcels of arrable and woodland lying in the parish of 
Tenterden, called or known by the name of Deadlandwood. My will is 
that Sarah, my wife, shall have full power and authority to grant bargain 
and sell the premises with the fee simple thereof forever to Robert Haffin- 
den and John Haffinden, my brothers-in-law, upon such " prizes " and such 
considerations as I have already agreed with them for, or if they refuse, she 
to sell the same at the best price to any other person, the money arising I 
give to my said wife towards her own maintenance and the enabling her 
to pay my debts and legacies above said. My three sons shall release their 
interest and right unto the said lands unto such person or persons as shall 
buy the same (if they require it) before they receive their aforesaid lega- 
cies. [Signed] Stephen Iggulden. Witnesses : John Seyliard, scrivener, 
and John Iggulden, Proved 30 November 1624 on the testimony of John 
Seyliard and Micaiah Hall [sic], witnesses, by Sarah Igglenden, widow, the 
relict and executrix named in the will. (Consistory of Canterbury, vol. 
46, fo. 138.) 

Iggulden entries in the Registers of All Saints Church, 

Biddenden, 1538-1638 

1543 Richard Syme* and Margaret Igulden married 30 Sept. 

1552 Stephen, son of William Igulden, bapt. 19 Oct. 

1553 John son of Joseph Iggulden bapt 29 Sept. 
John son of Joseph Iggulden, buried 3 Oct. 

1554 Margaret, daughter of Joseph Yggylden bapt. 16 Nov. 

1557 William Igulden householder buried 28 April. 

1558 [From July to February, inclusive, there are only four entries.] 

1560 John Moyse and lettys Iggulden married 12 Sept. 
Margaret, daughter of John Igulden bapt. 27 Nov. 

1561 [From July to October, inclusive, there are only three entries.] 

1562 John son of John Iggulden bapt. 17 May. 

1563 Jone, daughter of John Egylden bapt. 22 Dec. 

1563 Bartholmewe Egylden and Jone married 18 Jan. [1563-4] 

1564 [Records from May to April 1565, inclusive, are missing.] 

1566 Alexander, son of Bartholomew Iggelden bapt. 1 Dec. 
William son of Jhon Iggleden bapt. 15 Dec. 

1567 Bartholomew Iggelden buried 24 July 

1574 The wife of James Iggleden buried 3 Feb. [1574-5] 
1578 Lettice daughter of Stephen Iggleden bapt. 17 Aug. 
1580 John son of Stephen Igulden bapt. 17 July. 

1582 Steven son of Steven Iggleden bapt. 16 April. 

1583 Nicholas Simon and Margaret Igulden married 16 Sept. 

1584 James son of Steven Iggleden, bapt. 5 April 
John Igulden and Ruth P"eilde married 4 Oct. 

1585 Susan, daughter of John Igleden bapt. 25 July 

1586 James son of Steven Igulden bapt. 14 Aug. 

Moses son of John Igulden bapt. 23 Jan. [1586-7] 

1587 William son of Stephen Igulden bapt. 20 Aug. 

William son of Stephen Igulden buried 27 Feb. [1587-8] 

* His will, made in 1561, mentions his daughter-in-law Sislej Igulden, under 20 
years of age. 

VOL. LXV. 13 



184 Genealogical Research in England [April 

1588 Elizabeth daughter of John Igulden bapt. 15 Sept. 
Steven,* son of Steven Igulden bapt. 14 Jan. [1588-9] 
Jone wife of Steven Igulden buried 22 Jan. 

1589 Steven Igulden and Mary Drayner widow, married 26 May. 
Richard son of John Igulden buried 8 Feb. [1589-90] 

1593 The son of Mary Igulden the supposed father Richard Dorman buried 

9 May. 
Joseph Igulden and Helen Lurken married 8 Oct. 

1594 Mary daughter of Joseph Igulden bapt. 20 Oct. 

1595 Ambrose and Letice, son and daughter of John Igulden bapt. 31 Aug. 

1597 Margery [sic~\ and Margaret, daughters of John Igulden bapt. 19 

Mar. [1597-8] 

1598 Mary, wife of Steven Iggleden buried 16 May. 

1599 Elizabeth daughter of James Iggleden bapt. 3 Feb, [1599-1600] 

1600 Dionyse daughter of Joseph Igulden bapt. 16 Nov. 

Dionese daughter of Stephen Igulden bapt. 1 Feb. [1600-01] 

1601 Elizabeth the wife of John Igulden the elder buried 24 Feb. [1601-2] 
1603 Hanna daughter of Joseph Igulden bapt. 15 May 

John son of James Igulden bapt. 19 June 

A son of Stephen Igulden unbaptized buried 19 Feb. [1603-4] 
1605 Joseph son of Stephen Igulden bapt. 14 April 
Joseph son of Joseph Igulden bapt. 29 Sept, 
Thomasin daughter of James Igulden bapt. 26 Jan. [1505-6] 
Steven Igulden householder buried 21 Feb. 

1607 Stephen son of Stephen Igulden bapt. 17 Jan. [1607-8] 

1608 John son of John Igulden the youngest John of that name bapt. 18 

Dec. 
Mercey daughter of James Igulden bapt. 18 Dec. 

1609 Beniamin son of Joseph Igulden bapt. 16 April 
Sarah daughter of Stephane Iggulden bapt. 22 Oct. 
Richard Iggulden and Joane Spranger married 20 Nov. 

1610 Jone daughter of Richard Iggulden bapt. 30 Sept. 

John Iggulden churchwarden, 1610 until his death in 1613. 

1611 John son of Stephen Igoulden bapt. 25 Aug. 

Warham Iggulden of Bittisden [Bethersden] who died at Joseph 

Iggulden's in Biddenden,- buried 6 Jan. [1611-12] 
John Iggulden Sen. buried 29 Jan. 

1612 Mercy daughter of James Iggulden buried 27 June 

Lydia daughter of James Iggulden bapt. 17 Jan. [1612-13] 

1613 Mary the wife of John Iggulden sen. buried 6 April 
A son of Joseph Iggulden unbaptised buried 24 May 
Thomas son of Stephen Iggulden bapt. 26 Dec. 

Mary daughter of John Iggulden Jun. bapt. 20 Feb. [1613-14] 

1615 Mother Iggulden an old woman was buried 4 Oct. 

1616 Joane daughter of John Egleden bapt. 15 Dec. 

1618 James Igleden buried 29 March. 

1619 James son of James Iggleden deceased buried 1 May 
Elizabeth daughter of John Iggleden bapt. 14 Nov. 

1620 Jonathan Lansdale and Margarett Iggleden married 29 June 
Elizabeth daughter of Stephen Iggleden bapt. 21 Jan. [1620-1] 

1621 Joseph Iggleden householder buried 4 April. 

* Without doubt this is a clerical error in the "Register for " Richard." 



1911] Genealogical Research in England 185 

1622 Margaret daughter of John Iggleden bapt. 15 Sept. 
Margaret daughter of John Iggleden buried 4 Oct. 
John son of Widow Iggleden buried 1 Oct. 

A child of Joseph Iggleden unbaptized buried 2 Feb. [1622-3] 

1623 James Browne and Elizabeth Iggulden married 23 April. 
Mary daughter of Stephen Iggleden bapt. 29 June 

A child of John Iggleden unbaptized buried 5 Oct. 

1624 Elizabeth daughter of Ambrose Iggleden bapt. 23 May. 

1625 Letice Iggulden buried 6 May 

John son of Ambrose Iggulden bapt. 6 May 

1626 William Large and Martha Iggleden married June 13 
Francis son of Daniel Iggleden bapt. 8 Oct. 

John son of William Large of Cranbrooke bapt. 4 Mar. [1626-7] 

1628 Richard son of Ambrose Iggulden bapt. 5 Oct. 
Stephen Iggulden and Elizabeth Bennett married 30 Nov. 
The wife of Joseph Iggulden buried 15 Dec. 

1629 Marie daughter of Daniel Iggulden bapt. 7 Feb. [1629-30] 
Joseph Iggulden and Phebe Rayner married 21 Jan. 
Elizabeth daughter of Steauen Iggulden bapt. 31 Jan. 

1630 Elizabeth daughter of Stephen Iggulden buried 25 July. 
John son of Ambrose Iggulden buried 30 Sept. 

Sarah daughter of Joseph Iggleden bapt. 3 Oct. 
Sarah daughter of Joseph Iggleden buried 23 Oct. 

1631 John son of Ambrose Iggulden bapt. 1 May 

Thomas Tarre and Thomasin Iggleden married 12 May. 
Ruth daughter of Stephen Iggleden bapt. 8 Nov. 
Joseph son of Joseph Iggleden bapt. 9 Oct. 

1633 Joseph son of Daniel Iggleden bapt. 6 Oct. 
Elizabeth daughter of Ambrose Iggulden bapt. 17 Nov. 

1634 Elizabeth daughter of Stephen Iggulden and his wife Elizabeth 

bapt. 11 May 

1635 Daniel son of Daniel Iggleden and wife Margaret bapt. 28 Oct. 

1636 Hannah daughter of Stephen Iggulden and wife Margaret* bapt. 

9 Oct. 

1637 The wife of John Iggulden buried 4 Sept. 

1637 Joseph, son of Benjamin Iggulden and wife Phebe bapt. 4 March. 
[1637-8] 

Iggulden entries in the Registers op St. Mildred's Church, 

Tenterden, 1544r-1638 

Marriages 
1576 Josias Igleden and Alice Fonnell 17 May. 
1578 James Igleden and Margaret Frenche 23 Sept. 
1585 Gye Tailer and Elizabeth Igleden, 9 May. 
1592 Josias Igleden and Anna Clamp. 9 May 
1606 Stephen Igleden and Sarah Haffinden, 13 Jan. [1606-7] 
1628 John Lucas of Morgeat and Sarah Eggleden of Tenterden, 29 Jan. 

[1628-9] 
1634 Thomas Haffinden and Susan Iggleden 20 Sept. 
1636 Richard Elficke and Margarett Iggleden 26 April 

* Apparently a clerical error for Elizabeth. This part of the register is carelessly 
written. 



186 Genealogical Research in England [April 

Baptisms 

1576 Alice daughter of Josias Igleden 20 May 

1578 Susanna daughter of James Igleden 13 Feb. [1578-9] 

1595 Margarett, daughter of Josias Igleden 26 Oct. 

1598 Mary daughter of Josias Egleden, 31 Dec. 

1601 John son of Josias Igleden 27 Dec. 

1606 Susannah daughter of Josias Igleden 21 Dec. 

1609 Josias, son of Josias Igleden 31 Dec. 

1615 Margaret, daughter of Stephen Egleden 11 Feb. [1615-16] 
1618 Susan daughter of Steuen Igleden, 21 June 

Burials 

1584 James Igleden 23 June. 

1584 Susannah Igleden 9 March [1584-5] 

1592 Josias Igleden had a daughter dead born, unbaptised 27 Aug. 

1600 Alice Igleden a poor maid 20 Feb. [1600-1] 

1610 Josias son of Josias Igleden 8 Dec. 
1617 Marie daughter of Josias Igleden 5 July 
1620 Ann wife of Josias Iggleden 19 June 

[The foregoing wills and register abstracts show the following pedigree 
of Stephen Iggleden of Biddenden, co. Kent, whose family came to New 
England.] 

1. Richard Iggleden of Bindenden left a widow Alice, testatrix of 

1475. Their youngest son, 

2. John Iggleden of Biddenden, the testator of 1511, left a wife Alice. 

Their sons were : 

3. Richard Iggleden of Biddenden, the testator of 1518, and John 

Iggleden, whose will has not been found. The latter was evi- 
dently father of 

4. William Iggleden of Biddenden, born about 1510, the testator of 

1557. His youngest child by his second wife, Lettice Stacy, 
was 

5. Stephen Iggleden of Biddenden, bapt. 19 Oct. 1552, the testator 

of 1605. He had three wives, Joane, Mary, and Dionys. His 
third child, 

6. Stephen Iggleden of Biddenden and Tenterden, baptized 16 Apr. 

1582, was the testator of 1624. He married at Tenterden 13 Jan. 
1606-7, Sarah Haffenden. 
Children : 

7. i. Stephen, bapt. at Biddenden, 17 Jan. 1607-8. 

ii. Sarah, bapt. at Biddenden, 22 Oct. 1609 ; probably m. at Tenter- 
den, 29 Jan. 1628-9, John Lucas. 

iii. John, bapt. at Biddenden, 25 Aug. 1611. A John Eggletonor 
Eggleden was early of Fairfield, Conn, (where in 1659 settled 
Joseph Patchen, who m. in 1642, Elizabeth, widow of Stephen 
Iggleden, No. 7) . This John Eggleden d. at Fairfield in 1659, 
leaving a son John, who d. young, and a widow Peaceable, who 
m. (2) Daniel Silliman. 

iv. Thomas, bapt. at Biddenden 26 Dec. 1613 ; living in 1624. 

v. Margaret, bapt. at Tenterden 11 Feb. 1615-16; probably m. at 
Tenterden, 26 Apr. 1636, Richard Elficke. 

vi. Susan, bapt. at Tenterden 21 June 1618; probably m. at Tenter- 
den, 20 Sept. 1634, Thomas Haffenden. 



1911] Genealogical Research in England 187 

vii. Elizabeth, bapt. at Biddenden 21 Jan. 1620-1; evidently came to 
New England with the widow of her brother Stephen Iggleden 
(No. 7). The records of Roxbury, Mass., show the marriage of 
Philip Meadows and Elizabeth Ingulden, Apr. 1641. Child: 
Hannah, b. at Roxbury 1 Feb. 1642-3. Savage and other author- 
ities erroneously state that Elizabeth Iggleden, wife of Philip 
Meadows, was daughter of Stephen Iggleden (No. 7). 

viii. Mary, bapt. at Biddenden 29 June 1623. 

7. Stephen Iggleden, baptized at Biddenden 17 Jan. 1607-8, died 
about 1638. He married there, 30 Nov. 1628, Elizabeth Ben- 
nett. She came with her children to New England in the sum- 
mer of 1638 in the Castle, which brought a company from Tenter- 
den and vicinity, among them Peter Branch of Halden, co. Kent 
(which lies between Tenterden and Biddenden), who died on the 
voyage and by his will, dated 16 June 1638 and probated at Bos- 
ton, left a reversionary bequest to " widowe Igleden the late wife 
of Stephen Igleden or to his children or to her children she had 
by him." She settled at Roxbury, Mass., where as " Widdow 
Iggulden " she appears in a list of proprietors in 1639. Three 
years later her marriage appears in Roxbury : " Joseph Patching 
and Elizabeth Ingulden, Apr. 10," 1642. On 20 Oct. 1646 
" Egleden, daughter in law to Joseph Patchen she was about 10 y. 
old, she dyed of a paine first in her head, then in her back " 
(Roxbury Church Records). " Goodwife Patchin a poor old wo- 
man " joined the Roxbury Church 14 Mar. 1649-50, and her two 
sons Joseph and John Patchen were baptized. Joseph Patchen re- 
moved in 1651 to Fairfield, Conn. 
Children baptized at Biddenden : 

i. Elizabeth, bapt. 31 Jan. 1629-30 ; bur. 25 July 1630. 
ii. Ruth, bapt. 8 Nov. 1631. 
iii. Elizabeth, bapt. 11 May 1634. 

iv. Hannah, bapt. 9 Oct. 1636; d. at Roxbury, Mass., 20 Oct. 1646, 
aged 10 years. 

[There was a Richard Iggleden, mariner, of Boston, who married Ann 
Prince, 19 July 1660, and administration on whose estate was given to 
Oliver Purchase 1 May 1667. Savage and other authorities state that he 
was son of Stephen Iggleden, but give no evidence for the assertion. 

At Woburn, Mass., John Nutting married, 28 Aug. 1650, Sarah Eggle- 
ton, and Samuel Blodgett married, 13 Dec. 1655, Ruth Eggleton. Savage 
and others have suggested these two were also daughters of Stephen Iggle- 
den (No. 7), but, as Mr. Arthur G. Loring has pointed out, in 1674 Nutt- 
ing and Blodgett agreed to support their mother-in-law Jane, widow of 
Isaac Cole. She was born about 1600, was formerly wife of James Britton, 
and evidently still earlier the wife of one Eggleton, by whom she had Sarah 
and Ruth. (See Register, vol. 59, p. 417.)] 

[In the July number will appear interesting details of the ancestry of 
Moses Paine of Braintree, Nathaniel Tilden of Scituate, Samuel Hinck- 
ley of Barnstable, Jonas Austin of Taunton, Richard Sealis of Scituate, 
and other early settlers of New England from Tenterden, co. Kent.] 

[To be continued] 



188 Proceedings of the N. E. Hist, Gen, Society [April 



PROCEEDINGS OF THE NEW ENGLAND HISTORIC 

GENEALOGICAL SOCIETY 

By John Albree, Recording Secretary 

Boston, 3fassachusetts, 7 December, 1910. A stated meeting of the New 
England Historic Genealogical Society was held at Pilgrim Hall, 14 Beacon 
Street, at 2.30 p.m., President Baxter presiding. 

The records of the November meeting were read and approved. 

Seven resident members were elected by ballot. 

The reports of the Corresponding Secretary, Librarian, Historian, and Council 
were accepted. 

Messrs. Henry Edwards Scott and George Sawin Stewart were appointed by 
the President to act as auditors. 

On motion, the President appointed Charles Sidney Ensign, John Albree, and 
Hon. Jedediah Dwelley a committee to prepare a minute for the records in 
memoriam William Carver Bates. 

On motion of Charles Sidney Ensign, seconded by Henry Winchester Cun- 
ningham, the following vote was adopted : 

Voted, — That the Council of the New England Historic Genealogical Society 
be, and hereby is, authorized and instructed to erect a suitable building for the 
present and probable future needs of the Society on the land now owned by the 
Society on Beacon Hill, with an entrance from Ashburton Place ; and also to 
make all plans necessary for financing this undertaking. 

Edmund H. Garrett of Boston spoke on Baronial Halls and Elizabethan Man- 
sions: their history, romance, and beauty. He traced the development of the 
mansion from the castle of feudal times, using stereopticon slides from photo- 
graphs he himself had made to illustrate his theme. 

After a vote of thanks to the speaker, the meeting dissolved at 4.10 p.m., and 
the members and their friends partook of the refreshments provided. During 
the social hour there was piano music by Mrs. Lawrence Brainerd. 

4 January, 1911. A stated meeting of the New England Historic Genea- 
logical Society was held at Pilgrim Hall, 14 Beacon Street, at 2.30 p.m., Vice- 
President Cunningham presiding. 

The records of the December meeting were read and approved. 

The reports of the Corresponding Secretary, Librarian, Historian, and Coun- 
cil were accepted and ordered filed. 

Seven resident members were elected by ballot. 

The Committee in memoriam William Carver Bates submitted the following 
minute which was adopted by vote : 

Through the death of William Carver Bates, a member of the Council, the New 
England Historic Genealogical Society has lost an enthusiastic supporter. He be- 
lieved in it and in its ability to accomplish its work, and to its requests for aid he 
cordially responded. He was an especially valuable member of committees, for he 
was ready with practical suggestions in the support of which he was able to enlist the 
active co-operation of his associates. The thorough manner in which he obtained re- 
sults was an inspiration to his fellow-workers. His cheery pei'sonality, his zeal and 
bis courage made him an associate whom we shall greatly miss. 

Hon. William T. A. Fitzgerald, LL.B., Register of Deeds for Suffolk County, 
read a paper on the History and Development of Conveyancing, in which he 
traced the development of the ownership of land, and of the methods of making 
and recording transfers of title. He closed with a recital of incidents, such as 
occur in the daily routine of his office, to show the need of extreme care in the 
transfer of real estate. 

After remarks by Messrs. Cunningham, Stark, and Mann, it was, on motion 
of Mr. Frank E. Bradish, 

Voted, — That the Society expresses its appreciation of the paper of Mr. 
Fitzgerald in which he has given the benefit of his wide research and practical 
experience. 

At 4 p.m. it was voted to dissolve, after which refreshments were served, and 
an opportunity was afforded to inspect the ancient parchments, the earliest dating^ 
from 1436, from the collections of the Society and of Edward Curling Albree. " 



1911] 



Notes 189 



25 January. The annual meeting of the Society was held this day, agreeable 
to article 1, chapter ni, of the By-laws; for a report of which see the Supple- 
ment to the present number of the Register. 

1 February. A stated meeting of the New England Historic Genealogical 
Society was held at Pilgrim Hall, 14 Beacon Street, at 2.30 p.m., President 
Baxter presiding. 

The records of the annual meeting, January 25, were read and approved. 

The reports of the Corresponding Secretary, Librarian, Historian, and Coun- 
cil were accepted and ordered filed. 

Four resident members were elected by ballot. 

Rev. George Hodges, who had been announced as the speaker, was prevented 
"by illness from coming. , 

Minna Eliot Teniiey spoke on Beautiful New Brunswick and Historic Quebec, 
illustrating the lecture with stereopticon slides in which the picturesque and 
the historic features of the country were shown in detail. 

At 3.50 p.m. it was voted to dissolve, and refreshments were then served. 



NOTES 

Parentage of Gov. Thomas Dudley. — For nearly a century fruitless efforts 
have been made to substantiate the statements of Cotton Mather, that Gov. 
Dudley was born in Northampton about 1574, son of Capt. Roger Dudley, and 
that his mother was a kinswoman of Judge Nicolls, although persistent search 
was made in the records of the Dudley and Nicolls families, and among the 
Pells and Purefoys, who were connected with the Nicolls family. In the Reg- 
ister for October. 1895, Mr. H. F. Waters published the will of a John Purefoy, 
1579, which mentioned a Thomas Dudley. (See Register, vol. 49, p. 507, or 
Waters' Gleanings, p. 1087.) This will was fully annotated by Mr. Dean Dud- 
ley, who furnished an account of the Purefoy family, derived from the Visi- 
tation of Leicestershire and from Nicholls's History of that county, which 
stated that Mary Purefoy, sister of this testator John Purefoy, married Thomas 
Thome of Yardley, co. Northants, and of their six children " Susanna Thorne 
m. Rogers." That this " Rogers" should be Roger Dudley is proved by the 
register of Yardley Hastings, which records, 12 Oct. 1576, the baptism of 
Thomas Dudley, son of Roger and Susanna (Thorne) Dudley, as has recently 
been made public in vol. 1, p. 93, of the " Stokes Records " (1910). The state- 
ments of Cotton Mather are thus confirmed. 

Dorchester, Mass. Joseph Gardner Bartlett. 



Ancestry of William Dyer. — There are in Abington, Whitman, and East 
Bridge water, Mass., and elsewhere, many descendants of William Dyer, who 
with his wife Joanna was the earliest settler, in 1099, of that part of Bridge- 
water since known as Abington and Whitman. The ancestry of William Dyer 
has been unknown, while his wife has been called by some Joanna Chard and by 
others Joanna Bicknell. His relationship to Dea. Thomas Dyer of Weymouth, 
Mass., has seemed probable, but the historians Hobart, Mitchell, Nash, Rev. 
Ebenczer Porter Dyer, Rev. Charles Cummings, and others, searched in vain for 
proof. 

A short distance west of the railroad station at Whitman, William Dyer built 
his log cabin, near a fine spring of water, and here Christopher, his son. was 
born in 1701, the first child born in the town of Abington. He married again, 
April 17, 1712, Mary Whitman, and removed to Weymouth, where his wife died 
September 25, 1725. He died prior to August 15, 1750, when his will was 
probated. 

Evidence is now at hand that this Abington pioneer, William Dyer, was a son 
of Christopher, who was the sou of William, both early settlers of Sheepscot, 
Me., where tiny were massacred by the Indians during King Philip's War, 
1676-1678. Cuflhmaa'a [Jistory of Sheepscot Bays: " William Pyer, who had 
been in the region of Baoo, was one of three men chosen by the King's com- 
missioner- a> a Justice of th<- Peace." The name- of William Dyer and of his 
son Christopher an- on a recorded list of those who took the oath of allegiance 
at Sheepscoi in 1666. Their farms were described In a survey of lk the demoli- 
tions of the town uecke," so called, by one Nicholas Maiming, a surveyor under 



190 Notes [April 

John Palmer, who was an agent for the Duke of York.* Where the Sheepscot 
River divides at the Burnt Islands, and the East Branch with its deep indenta- 
tions seeks again to mingle its divided waters with the main sweep of the river 
above the falls, there at the " north pount" of the Great or u Towne Necke" 
William Dyer built his cabin at the mouth of the river which still bears his 
name, and opposite that other neck known as Dyer's Neck to the present day. 
The river and neck are lasting monuments to William Dyer, the pioneer, who 
was the first to lose his life (according to Cushman) from Indian hatred in the 
general massacre when Sheepscot was pillaged and sacked by the Indians in 
1676. " William Dyer was a large, stout man." His death threw his family 
and the colony at Sheepscot into despair. Following his death many of the 
colonists were killed, and the survivors fled in terror to other settlements, but 
mostly to Boston and vicinity. 

William Dyer had two sons — Christopher, the elder ; John, born about 1648 — 
and a daughter Mary, who married Samuel Bolles. 

Christopher Dyer married first , and had William, John, and Grace 

who married, about 1683, John Allicett, or Ellisett, of Boston ; he married sec- 
ondly Ruth , and had Mary who married, in 1698, Samuel Talbot of 

Taunton, and Ruth who married Benjamin Paul of Taunton, and died at Berkley 
January 24, 1776, in the 93d year of her age. The widow Ruth Dyer married, 
October 10, 1692, John Hathaway, and died September 11, 1705, aged 65 years. 

At the desertion of the Sheepscot settlement, about 1676, Christopher and 
John Dyer went to Scituate and Braintree. August 30, 1682, they joined with 
other survivors of the refugees in a compact made at Boston to reoccupy their 
homes at Sheepscot before September 29, 1683, and the Indian disturbances 
having ceased they returned to their abandoned farms. Here, for a few years 
of comparative quiet with the Indians, they prospered until near the close of 
King Philip's War, when Indian hostilities again assailed the Sheepscot colony, 
and John Dyer was severely wounded, and was taken by his brother Christopher 
to Fort Pemaquid, fifteen miles or more, the nearest place, for surgical treat- 
ment. About 1688 or 1689 the Indians again attacked and completely broke up 
the Sheepscot settlement. Christopher Dyer, with others, was killed. 

John Dyer, in his deposition dated January 19, 1732-3, says that his father 
William Dyer was killed by the Indians in or about the month of August above 
forty-two years since, and that some few months after the death of his father, 
viz. in or about the month of December, his eldest brother Christopher was 
also killed by the Indians ; that Christopher left a son William and other chil- 
dren, said William now residing in Weymouth. Esther Roberts of Boston also 
deposes to the same effect. 

The inhabitants who escaped massacre fled never to return, and Sheepscot 
was deserted for thirty years. 

Ruth, the widow of Christopher Dyer, was in 1692 living with her two 
young daughters, Mary and Ruth Dyer, at Braintree, Mass., where she was 
again married at the age of fifty-two to John Hathaway of Taunton, Mass. The 
two daughters of Christopher and Ruth Dyer went with their mother to their 
new home in Taunton, and in time married there. Mary Dyer married Samuel 
. Talbot of Taunton in 1698, and Ruth Dyer married Benjamin Paul of Taunton 
about 1704. A descendant of this Ruth Dyer, E. Paul, Esq., a lawyer of 
Minneapolis, Minn., in searching for the previous history of the widow Ruth 
Dyer of Braintree, found proof that she was the second wife of Christopher 
Dyer of Sheepscot, and that he had by his first wife a son William, who was 
the first settler at a place called Little Comfort in Bridgewater and Abington, 
Mass. Mr. Paul prepared a valuable paper, which he presented early in the last 
decade, concerning the Dyer-Talbot-Paul and other Taunton families, from 
which this paper is largely drawn. The original is now in the library of the 
Old Colony Historical Society of Taunton, of which Col. Seaver is the secretary. 

John Dyer, the brother of Christopher, fled from Sheepscot to Braintree, 
Mass., where he remained for the rest of his life and reared a large family. He 
married first Sarah, and secondly Anna Holbrook. Rev. Samuel Niles, the 
minister of Braintree, refers to him under date of April 23, 1733, thus : " This 
day buried John Dyer the aged." Judge Samuel Sewall also refers to him in 
his diary under date of February 1, 1680-1, as follows : " Last night one Dyer 
of Braintrey shot an Indian to death as he was breaking his window and at- 

* See Cushman, op. cit. facing p. 25, for a reproduction of the map. 



1911] 



Notes 191 



tempting to get into his House against his will, Saying he would shoot him 
[like ?] a Dogg bee. would not let him come in to light his Pipe. Man was 
abed. Indian's gun found charg'd, cock* and prim'd in ,his Hand." (5 Mass. 
Hist. Soc. Coll., vol. 6, and Sewall papers, vol. 2, p. 15*.) John Dyer had to 
give the Indian's widow six pounds and pay costs, according to the court records 
(Records of the Court of Assistants in Mass. Bay, 1630-1692, vol. 1, p. 188). 
John Dyer in his will speaks of his small estate as gathered mostly by the 
industry of his wife, " because I have been incapacitated by wounds received 
in the Eastern Wars." 

Hobart's History of Abington mentions several Dyers, descendants of Wil- 
liam Dyer of Abington, who emigrated to other towns, and that their descend- 
ants were numerous. 

(This paper is presented by the Hon. James Sidney Allen of Brockton, Mass., 
and Dr. Ebenezer Alden Dyer of Whitman, Mass., both of whom are of the 
seventh generation from William Dyer, the pioneer of Abington.) 



Historical Intelligence 

Ayer.— The Diary of Sarah Connell Ayer, Newburyport and Andover, Mass., 
1805-09, Concord and Bow, N. H., 1809-11, 1833-35, and Portland and Eastport, 
Me., 1811-33, is about to be published by H. W. Bryant, 223 Middle Street, 
Portland, to whom inquiries should be addressed. 



Whittier. — Charles Collyer Whittier, Grove Hall Station, Roxbury, Mass., is 
engaged in collecting material for a genealogical history of the Whittier family, 
which also includes Whitcher and Whicher. A large amount of records of the 
several generations, and many interesting facts concerning the earlier genera- 
tions of the family, have already been gathered. The records of the entire 
family are desired. 



Genealogies ln Preparation. — Persons of the several names are advised to 
furnish the compilers of these genealogies with records of their own families 
and other information which they think may be useful. We would suggest that 
all facts of interest illustrating family history or character be communicated, 
especially service under theU. S. Government, the holding of other offices, grad- 
uation from college or professional schools, occupation, with places and dates 
of birth, marriage, residence, and death. All names should be given in full if 
possible. No initials should be used when the full name is known. 

Adams. — Elijah, who was born at West Medway, Mass., 7 Jan. 1753, by Nelson 
Adams, 868 Belmont Avenue, Springfield, Mass. 

Baldwin. — Elias Jones, who was born at Windsor, Mass., 14 July 1798, by 
Ralph H. Chappell, Bureau of Engraving & Printing, Washington, D. C. 

Beeman. — Simon, who died at Springfield, Mass., in 1675, by Rev. L. L. Bee- 
man, Ware, Mass., and Roy Douglas Beman, Harrisburg, Pa. 

Belknap. — Abraham, who died at Lynn, Mass., in 1643, by Henry Wyckoff 
Belknap, 31 Warren Street, Salem, Mass., and Hyrum Belknap, 229 24th Street, 
Ogden, Utah. 

Bidwell. — John, who died at Hartford, Conn., in 1687, by Clinton David Higby, 
Erie, Pa. 

Bishop. — John, who died at Guilford, Conn., Feb. 1661, by William W. Cone, 
Brandsville, Mo., and George A. Root, care State Historical Society, Topeka, 
Kan-. 

Brazer, — Christopher, who died at Boston 12 Nov. 1803, by Clarence Wilson 
Brazer, 1133 Broadway, New York, N. Y. 

Browne.— John, who died at Rehoboth, Mass., 10 Apr. 1662, by Benjamin 
William Brown. Xorthbridge, Mass. 

Butts. — Rufus, who was born at Canterbury, Conn., 14 Aug. 1755, by Ralph II. 
Chappell, Bureau of Engraving & Printing, Washington, D. C. 



192 Book Notices [April 

Chappell.— George, who died at New London in 1709, by Dr. Ora A. Chap- 
pell, Elgin, 111. ; and Amaziah, who was born at Lebanon, Conn., 14 Aug. 1753 
(?), by Ralph H. Chappell, Bureau of Engraving and Printing, Washington, 

Eliot.— Thomas, who died at Rehoboth, Mass., 23 May 1700, by Miss Ella F. 
Elliot, 59 Oxford Street, Somerville, Mass. 

Hendrick. — Dr. Stephen, who was born at Bolton, Mass., 10 July 1750, by 
Eugeue P. King, Health Dept., City Hall, Providence, R. I. 

King. — Asa, who was born at Mansfield, Conn., 16 Jan. 1770, by Jennie Booth 
King, 30 Grant Street, Wellsboro, Pa. 

Lamunyon. — Philip, who was born at Tiverton, R. I., 7 Dec. 1756, by Ralph 
H. Chappell, Bureau of Engraving & Printing, Washington, D. C. 

McCrillis— John, who died in 1759, and William, who died in 1781, both at 
Colerain, Mass., by Herbert O. McCrillis, 201 Columbus Avenue, Boston., Mass. 

Miles. — John, who died at Concord, Mass., 26 Aug. 1693, by John Miles, Con- 
cord, Mass. 

Mills.— Samuel, who died at Dedham, Mass., Jan. 1694-5, by Miss Ella F. 
Elliot, 59 Oxford Street, Somerville, Mass. 

Parke. — Arthur, who died in Chester Co., Pa., in 1740, and others of the name 
in Pennsylvania, by Frank S. Parks, 204 H Street, N. W., Washington, D. C. 

Payne. — Stephen, who was probably born at Andover, Conn., by Ralph H. 
Chappell, Bureau of Engraving & Printing, Washington, D. C. 

Pence. — John, who was born in Shenandoah Co., Va., 15 Jan. 1775, by Kings- 
ley Adolphus Pence, 1240 Detroit Street, Denver, Colo. 

Eider. — Samuel, who died (probably) at Yarmouth, Mass., in 1697, by Miss 
Nellie Agnes Rider, 11 Medway Street, Providence, R. I. 

Boss.— James, who died at Sudbury, Mass., 17 Sept. 1690, by Ernest E. 
Fewkes, 120 Hyde Street, Newton Highlands, Mass. 

Waterhouse — Jacob, who died at New London, Conn., in 1676, by Henry 
Wyckoff Belknap, 31 Warren Street, Salem, Mass. 



BOOK NOTICES* 



By a vote of the Committee on Publications the present form of 
Book Notices will be discontinued after this number. As in the 
past, only books given to the Society will be listed, and in addi- 
tion to the full title there will appear descriptive remarks when 
it is necessary to mention the scope of the contents. In the con- 
templated form the Book Notices should be of greater use for 
reference, as will be seen by comparison with a similar method 
employed by the Publishers' Weekly. 

[The editor requests persons sending books for notice to state, for the information 
of readers, the price of each book, with the amount to be added for postage when sent 
by mail. For the January issue, books should be received by Nov. 1 ; for April, by 
Feb. 1 ; for July, by May 1 ; and for October, by July 1.] 

The Alexander Letters, 1789-1900, with introduction by Marion A. Boggs and 
George J. Baldwin. Privately printed, Savannah, Ga., 1910. 8° pp. 317, 
illus. 

These letters were written by the family and descendants of Adam Leopold 
Alexander and his wife, Sarah Hillhouse Gilbert. Those descriptive of life on 
a Georgia plantation and in Savannah early in the nineteenth century, experi- 
ences at boarding-school and at college in the fifties, letters written during 
the Civil War, and later those written from far and wide, are all interesting. 
The supplement contains the genealogy of the family, which claims Dutch and 
Scotch ancestry on one side, and that of Virginia and Connecticut on the other. 

* All the unsigned reviews are written by Miss Helen Tilden Wild of Medford. 



1911] 



Booh Notices 198 



The Bates Bulletin, Vol. 4, No. 1, Sept. 1910. 8° pp. 1-12, illus. Single cop- 
ies, 25 cents. 

The Bates family in South Carolina and another in Norwich, Conn., are re- 
corded in two interesting genealogical papers. Bates marriages and deaths in 
Abington, Mass., are continued, and Mr. Warren S. Parker contributes a paper 
upon " Early Land Grants in Quincy, Mass." The annual meeting at Cohasset, 
1910, is reported. 

Booth Genealogy, compiled and arranged by Henry Slader Booth, Randolph, 

Vt., 1908. 8° pp. 18, illus. 

In this genealogy the design has been to follow only the direct line of descent, 
in the early generations in England and previous to Oliver 5 Booth (Joshua, 4 
William, 3 Simeon, 2 Robert 1 ). Robert 1 Booth was of Exeter, N. H., 1645, and 
later of Saco, Me. ; Joshua 4 Booth died in the Indian war, 1757 ; and Joshua, 6 
son of Oliver, 6 was a soldier of the American Revolution. 

The Bromioell Genealogy, including descendants of William Bromwell and Beulah 
Hall, with data relating to others of the Bromwell name in America. Also 
genea logical records of branches of the allied families of Holmes (of Plymouth 
Co., 31ass.), Payne (of Kentucky and Indiana), Bice and Leffler (of Bice's 
Fort, Penna.), with some descendants of Major Conrad Leffler, of Pennsylvania, 
and of the Bev. Peter Fullenwider, Ben. Jasper Simler, and Jonathan Boone, 
of Kentucky, by Harriet E. Bromwell. 1910. 8° pp. 243, illus. Price 
$3.50. Address the author, P. O. Box 50, Denver, Col. 

This volume, which is handsomely bound and has many good illustrations, 
contains about four thousand names. The union in these families of Quaker, 
Pilgrim, German, Swiss, and Swedish stock will cause this genealogy to be 
sought by many throughout a large territory. Many biographical sketches are 
given. There is an index attached of those bearing the names mentioned on 
the title-page, and a complete index is in preparation. 

Genealogical History of the Call Family in the United States, also biographical 
sketches of members of the family, by Simeon T. Call. Emington, 111., 1908. 
8° pp. 25. 

Various branches of the Call family are traced back to the first settler of the 
name in America, James Call, whose line is most carefully followed. He was a 
soldier in the War of the Revolution, being a private in the Vermont Rangers, 
and five of his sons also served during that war. A list of books which contain 
information regarding the Call family in New England and New York forms a 
useful supplement to the pamphlet. 

The Chase Chronicle, October 1910. Vol. 1, No. 4. Published quarterly by 
the Chase-Chace family association. Park Vale, Editor. 8° pp. 39-52, illus. 
Price, 5 cents a year. 

This publication is devoted mainly to the descendants of William Chase, who 
settled in Roxbury, Mass., 1630. Several other branches of the family are men- 
tioned briefly. There is an illustrated article in memory of Obediah Chase, a 
minister of the Friends' Church, who died in 1907. 

The Family of Debenham of Suffolk, compiled by Walter Debenham Sweeting, 
M.A. Printed for private distribution by The St. Catherine Press, Ltd., 8, 
York Building, Adelphi, 1909. 4° pp. 92+4, illus., chart. 

This publication deals chiefly with the English branches of a family which 
originated upon the banks of the Deben River in Suffolk, Eng., but considerable 
space is given to those of the name who have emigrated to America. More 
than half of the book consists of quotations from and discussions of ancient 
family records (the first mention of the name in England occurring A.D. 1165), 
the descriptions of coats of arms, and a list of wills in the Court of the Arch- 
deaconry of Sudbury. The volume unfortunately lacks an index. 

An historical narrative of the Ely, Bevell, and Stacy e Families, vjJw were among 
the founders of Trenton and Burlington in the Province of West Jersey, 1678- 
1683, vnth the genealogy of the Ely descendants in America, compiled by the 
late Reuben Pownall Ely, Warren Smedley Ely, and Daniel Brittaln 



194 Book Notices [April 

Ely. 1910. 8° pp. 445, illus. Price, cloth $5 ; half leather $7. Address 
Daniel B. Ely, 80 Broadway, New York City. 

In the ship Shield, which anchored in the Delaware in 1678, were Thomas 
Revell, Mahlon Stacy and his wife Rebecca Ely. Joshua Ely joined the colony 
in 1683. The ancestry of these immigrants has been carefully studied by Mr. 
D. B. Ely, who has visited their homes in England and consulted records there 
with quite remarkable results. Ancient coats of arms have been brought to 
light and reproduced among the illustrations of the book ; also letters written 
from New Jersey to those in the home land. Names of plantations in Jersey 
have been found to be duplicates of ancestral estates in England. The genea- 
logical and biographical parts of the volume are well handled. An abstract of 
each chapter and a carefully prepared index add materially to the practical value 
of the work. 

Aaron French and his descendants, compiled by Charles Newton French. 
Chicago, privately printed, 1910. 16° pp. 31. 

This little book records the children, grandchildren, and great-grandchildren 
of Aaron French, of New Jersey, 1739-1805. Nine other immigrants bearing the 
surname, who arrived in this country previous to 1700, are mentioned and some 
account of them is added. The family records given are, with few exceptions, 
compiled from unpublished material, from epitaphs, and tradition. Great care 
has been taken to record middle names in full — a commendable feature which 
ought to be more generally followed. 

Tlie Fulham Genealogy , with index of names and blanks for records, by Volney 
Sewall Fulham. Burlington, Vt., Free Press Co./l910. 12° pp. 291+10, 
illus. 

This volume gives the record of the descendants of Hon. Francis Fulham, 
who died in Weston, Mass., in 1757. Some space is given to genealogical notes 
on the Fulham family in England, although the connection with the American 
family is not established. The author lays much stress upon family traditions, 
traits of character, and personal resemblances, which he has observed in the 
early and later generations. 

Pedigree of the family of Grazebrook, with ample proofs for every generation. 
Part I, from 1035 until the representation in the direct male line became vested 
in that branch which settled in Shenston, Co. Stafford, in 1204, by George 
Grazebrook, F.S.A. Privately printed from 4 Miscellanea Genealogica et 
Heraldica, vol. ii, p. 268 et seq., London, Mitchell Hughes and Clarke, 1910. 
4° pp. 85, illus. 

To Americans who have so long been obliged to content themselves only with 
probabilities in regard to their ancestry beyond the Atlantic, this product of the 
researches of an English scholar is an evidence of what can be accomplished by 
persistent effort. Mr. Grazebrook has recorded nothing for which he cannot 
give good authority. His knowledge of heraldry has materially aided in gath- 
ering material and explaining obscure records. 

Aris Sonis Focisque, being a memoir of an American family, the Harrisons of 
Skimino, and particularly of Jesse Burton Harrison and Burton Norvell Har- 
rison, edited by Fairfax Harrison from material collected by Francis Bur- 
ton Harrison. Privately printed, 1910. 8° pp. 413. 

The beautiful family life, the stern adherence to principle as exemplified by 
the Quaker "William Harrison, softened and moulded into more intellectual 
channels in the later generations, impresses the reader of this story of a gifted 
Virginia family. It is told in a graceful, attractive style, and we regret that a 
larger edition was not published. 

James Hayward, born April 4, 1750 ; killed in Battle of Lexington, April 19, 
1775 ; ivith genealogical notes relating to the Haywards, by Everett Hosmer 
Barney. Privately printed, Springfield, Mass., 1911. 8° pp. 59, illus. 
This book is the result of an accumulation of material gathered while pre- 
paring a record of a branch of the Barney family, which, though not bearing 
directly upon the matter in hand, seemed to demand publication. Besides gene- 
alogy, the book contains a roster of the companies of Capt. Isaac Davis and 
Capt. John Hayward, both of Acton ; an article upon the Davis monument at 



1911] 



Booh Notices 195 



Acton, Mass. ; and notes referring to the Concord-Lexington fight. The illus- 
trations are especially interesting. 

Genealogy of the Houser, Rhorer, Dillman, Hoover Families, compiled by Dr. 
William Wesley Housek and others. 1910. 8° pp. 239, illus. 

This genealogy is the product of the reunions of the Illinois families whose 
names appear on the title-page. Their progenitors were born in Germany, 
settled in Maryland in 1770, and later emigrated to Kentucky. Led by a desire 
to rear their children in a free state, their descendants became residents of Ohio, 
Indiana, and Illinois. The book is profusely illustrated by family portraits. 

The descendants of Jonathan Kearsley, 1718-1782, and his wife Jane Kearsley, 
1720-1801 (from Scotland) , who settled at Carlisle, Penn'a. Died at Ship- 
pensburg, Pa., and are buried at Middle Spring Church Yard, Cumberland Co., 
Pa., compiled by Elmer L. White, 1900. 8° pp. 76. 

Copies of old manuscripts, Bible records, and wills are presented in this 
pamphlet with comparatively few comments by the compiler. Jonathan Kear- 
eley was called kt Doctor," and was a druggist or chemist. He refers in his 
memoirs to his parents, and states that he came to this country l< a fugitive," 
but fails to give his birthplace or his parents' names. Prominent residents of 
Pennsylvania and Virginia are among his descendants, Dr. S. Weir Mitchell, 
the author, being a great-grandson. 

The Portsmouth race of Monsons, Munsons, Mansons, comprising Bichard Mon- 
son (at Portsmouth, N. II., 1663) and his descendants. Being a contribution 
to a Genealogy and History of five' generations (with some extensions in Part 77), 
by Myron Andrews Munson. New Haven, Conn., 1910. 8° pp. 89, illus. 

In his introduction Mr. Munson gives special credit to Mr. Albert C. Mason, 
of Franklin, Mass., who was his coadjutor in the search for material. The 
book is printed as a forerunner of a more extended work upon which the two are 
engaged. The last few pages are given up to records of Robert Monson of the 
Isles of Shoals, and Robert of Scarborough, Me., but no genealogy is printed. 
An effort has been made, so far unsuccessfully, to connect these early New 
Hampshire and Maine families with each other and those of the name in Con- 
necticut. 

Descendants of Samuel Morse of Worthington, Massachusetts, by Harriet 
Morse Weeks of Evanston, 111. Pittsfleld, Mass., Press of Eagle Printing 
and Binding Co., 1907. 8° pp. 56+20. 

6amuel 6 Morse (Moses, 5 Daniel, 4 William, 8 Benjamin, 2 Anthony 1 ) was born 
at Preston, Conn., 1745. His sons emigrated to the Western Reserve about 
1809 aud settled in Williamsfield, Ohio. The family is numerous in that state, 
and many of its children have gone still further west. The value of the book 
would be increased if names appearing in the text more than once received a 
corresponding number of page references in the index. 

Prouty (Proute) Genealogy, compiled by Charles Henry Pope. Boston, Mass., 
Charles U. Pope, 221 Columbus Avenue, 1910. 8° pp. vii-f239, illus. 

The name Prouty has been variously spelled, appearing as Proute, Prout, 
Proud, Provvte, etc., in the early records of Scituate, Mass., and in England. 
The name as now spelled did not appear until the beginning of the nineteenth 
century. Coincidences of names and dates seem to substantiate the theory that 
Richard Proute, the emigrant ancestor, originated near Bristol, Eng. The 
genealogy is arranged after the system used in the Rkgister, and Mr. Pope's 
work is so well known that his name on the title-page is a sufficient guaranty 
for the excellence of the book. 

Descendants of Benjamin Rice of Conway, Mass., by Rev. Edwin B. Rice, M.A. 
New York, 1909. 8° pp. 35, illus. 

Edmund Rice, the emigrant ancestor of the Rice family, came to America in 
1638-9 and settled in Sudbury, Mass. Five children were born in Berkliamstead, 
Eng., and the father seems to have removed from that town to New England. 
His son Benjamin was born at Sudbury May 31, 1640. Three hundred and forty 
of his descendants are recorded, following the line of Benjamin of Conway 
(Ebenezer, Ebenezer, Benjamin.). There Is an index of those mentioned In 



196 Booh Notices [April 

the text bearing the name of Rice, with wives' names appended ; also names 
of descendants bearing other surnames. 

Conway, Mass., and the Bice family, by Rev. Edwin B. Rice, M.A., New York, 
1909. 8° pp. 49, illus. 

Cyrus Rice was the first settler in that part of Deerfield set off as the town of 
Conway in 1767. He was followed by several of his kinsmen, all descendants 
of Edmund Rice of Way land, Mass. The genealogical part of the pamphlet, 
which is arranged like the one noticed above, gives the descendants of Cyrus* 
Jonas, Joseph, Phineas, Israel, and Timothy — all residents of Conway. A short 
historical sketch of the town of Conway is given in the introduction. The 
frontispiece is a photogravure of the homestead of Edmund Rice in Wayland 
(formerly Sudbury). 

The descendants of Jacob Schoff, xoho came to Boston, 1752, and settled in Ash- 
bur nham in 1757, with an account of the German immigration into colonial 
New England, by Wilfred H. Schoff. Philadelphia, 1910. 8° pp. 163, illus. 

Jacob Schoff was one of seven Germans who bought from the town of Lex- 
ington, Mass., its holdings in Dorchester Canada, now Ashburnham. Besides 
the personal history of Schoff and his descendants, the account of the coming 
of the Germans to Massachusetts — an almost unknown phase in its history — is 
treated at length. From Ashburnham the emigrant went to Franconia, N. H., 
and thence to Maidstone and Brunswick, Vt. There are military records of 
Jacob and his descendants. The genealogy of the male lines is given at length, 
but female lines do not extend beyond one generation. 

Scoville Family Records, Part II. Descendants of Arthur Scovil of Boston, Mass., 
Middletown and Lyme, Conn., by Charles R.Eastman. Cambridge, Mass., 
privately printed, 1910. 8° pp. 22, port. 

This pamphlet is the second in a series, uniform in style, which Mr. Eastman 
intends to compile in preparation for a complete genealogy of the Scoville 
family. 

Descendants of Edward Small of New England, and the allied families, with trac- 
ings of English ancestry, by Lora Altine Woodbury Underhill. Cam- 
bridge, The Riverside Press, 1910. 3 vols. 8° pp. 1802, illus. 

The genealogy of the Small family proper occupies less than one third of this 
publication, but the records of the allied families are carefully traced and occu- 
py the rest of the book. These families are Allerton, Hatch, Sawyer, Mitchell, 
Jenney, Cooke, Cushman, Stetson, Chandler, Andrews, Roberts, Pratt, Heard, 
McKenney, Mariner, Dyer, and Talbot. The good sense of author and publisher 
is shown by the presentation of this extended genealogy in three volumes of 
moderate size, rather than in one huge folio. Every page is interesting and 
shows study of both English and early American records. 

Spelman Genealogy. The English ancestry and American descendants of Richard 
Spelman of Middletown, Conn., 1700, by Fannie Cooley Williams Barbour. 
New York, Frank Allaben Genealogical Co., 1910. 8° pp. 559, illus. 

The Spelmans (sometimes written Spilman or Spileman) are traced for fifteen 
generations in England to William Espileman, Kt., in the twelfth century. In 
America the family is carried through eight generations. The author did not 
live to see the publication of her book, and it was left to Mrs. John D. Rocke- 
feller (Laura C. Spelman), to whom Mrs. Barbour dedicated it, to carry the 
work to completion. The volume is not a collection of names and dates merely, 
but a family history full of character. 

A Quantock Family. The Stawells of Cathelstone and their descendants, the Bar- 
ons Stawell of Somerton, and the Stawells of Devonshire and the County Gorki 
compiled by Colonel George Donsworth Stawell. Taunton [Eng.] , Barni- 
coat and Pearce, the Wessex Press. 1910. 4° pp. 565, 14 charts, illus. 

The primary object of the compiler of this voluminous work was to prove 
that the Stawell families of Ireland and Australia were offshoots from the old 
family in Devonshire, Eng., where the name is now extinct. His researches 
have been rewarded in some respects beyond his expectations. The scope of 



1911] 



Booh Notices 197 



the work includes the early history of the Stawells, etymology of the name, the 
Stawells of Somerset, Devon, and Cork, arms and heraldry of the Stawells, 
genealogies and tables of descents, etc. The book is beautifully illustrated, 
and demands more than a cursory reading. 

Stetson Kindred of America {inc.). Brief sketch of work of organization and ex- 
tended account of second reunion held August 18, 1906. Address in full, copy 
of deed, land court decree, names of officers, members of corporation. Compiled 
by the secretary, George William Stetson, Medford, Mass. Tress of J. C. 
Miller, Jr., 1907. 8° pp. 39, illus. 

Lineal descendants of Cornet Robert Stetson, of Scituate (now Norwell), 
1635-1703, have formed an association and have acquired the homestead of 
their ancestor. In 1905, and every succeeding year, reunions have been held. 
An interesting sketch of Cornet Stetson, by Mr. D. E. Damon of Plymouth, 
Mass., is printed as a part of the proceedings of the second reunion. 

Genealogy of the Swasey Family, which includes the descendants of the Swezey 
families of Southold, Long Island, New York, and the descendants of the Swayze 
families of Boxbury, now Chester, New Jersey , by Benjamin Franklin Swasey 
of Exeter, N. H. Cleveland, Ohio, privately printed by Ambrose Swasey, 1910. 
8° pp. 525, illus. 

John Swasey and his two sons, Joseph and John, Jr., came to America and 
settled in Salem, Mass., as early as 1632. Joseph remained in Salem, but his 
father and brother removed to Southold, L. I., being driven from Salern on ac- 
count of their Quaker principles. The Salem branch has retained the old spell- 
ing of the name, but John, Jr., adopted Swayze as the spelling of his name. 
His descendants have adopted Swezey, and in some branches Swayzie. The plan 
of this genealogy is plain and easy to follow. Pictures of old homesteads of the 
second and third generations show the early types of dwellings in New England 
and the middle states. 

Genealogical index of some descendants of Bichard Walkley of Haddam, compiled 
by Stephen Walkley, Plantsville, Conn. 8° pp. 28. Further information 
furnished by the author on receipt of postage and cost of type-writing. 

This book is unique, as it gives the names and birth year of persons bearing 
the name of Walkley and allied families, further records of whom are in the 
possession of the compiler in manuscript form. " To trace your lineage," says 
Mr. Walkley, " look for your father's name and you will see there his father's 
name, and so on back to the first generation." 

Some Wings of Old Dartmouth and their homes, by William Arthur Wing. 8° 
pp. 8, illus. 

In narrative form this little pamphlet gives the vital records and bits of per- 
sonal history of the families who lived in the live old houses illustrated. The 
houses are the Ricketson-Wing, Matthew Wing, and Job Almy homesteads, 
the house of John and Mercy (Almy) Wing, and "Quanset," the Job Almy 
mansion. 

Dr. Henry Woodward, the first English settler in South Carolina, and some of his 
descendants, by Joseph Walker Barnwell. 8° pp. 13. 

Dr. Woodward went from North Carolina with Robert Sanford's expedition 
to take possession of the land in the southern part of the territory granted by 
Charles 1L to the lords proprietors of Carolina. Captured by the Spanish, and 
recaptured by buccaneers, he was enabled to return to South Carolina with the 
Port Royal expedition and turn his knowledge of the Indians to the advantage 
of the English. From him are descended many noted southern families. The 
pamphlet prints the Woodward coat of arms and the romantic story of its iden- 
tification. 

Report of proceedings of the fourth, fifth, and sixth annual reunions of the Soci- 
ety of descendants of Henry Wolcott, one of the first settlers of Windsor, Connec- 
ticut, held August 1908, 1909, and 1910. 3 pamphlets. 12° pp. 14, 39, 25, 
illus. 

Reports and addresses presented at the reunions are the contents of these 
pamphlets. 



198 Booh Notices [April 

Descendants of Michael Tates by his sons, Abner and John, by Richard Yates. 
Springfield, 111., 311 Unity Building. Chart. 

Michael Yates was in Virginia in 1750, married Martha Marshall, and had 
six sons and one daughter. Abner died in Kentucky, and John died in Virginia. 
Seven generations of the family are recorded upon the chart. 

Of Sceptred Race, by Annah Robinson Watson. Early Printing and Publish- 
ing Co., Memphis, Tenn., 1910. 4° pp. 379+6, illus. Price $10. Address 
the author, 132 Montgomery Street, Memphis, Tenn. 

This beautiful book, printed on antique laid paper and bound in crimson with 
heraldic design in gold, is extremely artistic in all its details. Authorities for 
the statements regarding the descent of many American families from ancient 
kings of Great Britain are carefully noted. Among those mentioned are Wash- 
ington, Lee, Reade, Prescott, Taylor, Roosevelt, Saltonstall, Fauntleroy, O'Neil, 
Robinson, Johnston, and Morgan. The chapters on knighthood, heraldry, and 
ancient abbeys are instructive and interesting ; the whole book proves the lite- 
rary ability of ithe authoress, who has already excelled in fiction, poetry and 
historic genealogy. 

List of books on Genealogy and Heraldry in the Syracuse Public Library, includ- 
ing parish registers, visitations, history of names, and allied subjects. Edition 
of 1910. Published by the Library, 1910. 

Memorial of Hon. Harry Bingham, LL.D., lawyer, legislator, author, edited by 
Henry Harrison Metcalf under the direction of Messrs. Aldrich, Batchellor, 
and Mitchell, literary executors. Privately printed and gratuitously issued. 
Concord, N. H., 1910. 8° pp. 14+505. 

This book opens with a biographical sketch, press tributes, and eulogies by 
members of the New Hampshire bar, but extracts from Mr. Bingham's writings 
make up the bulk of the book. He was especially active in the railroad litiga- 
tion which agitated New Hampshire from 1870 to 1890. 

Centenary Sketch of William P. Chilton, by Claudius Lysias Chilton. Arthur 
B. Chilton, printer, Paragon Press, Montgomery, Ala., 1910. 8° pp. 13, port. 

William Parish Chilton was a native of Kentucky, born August 10, 1810. At 
the age of twenty-one he emigrated to Alabama, the state to which he devoted 
himself throughout his life. He was a whig, supporting Harrison and Clay, 
and, although he belonged to the minority party he attained the position of 
Justice of the Supreme Court of Alabama in 1849. While opposed to secession, 
when the Confederacy became a fact he gave it his support. The memorial was 
written by his youngest son. 

1844-1908. Thomas J. Gargan. A 31emorial ; with an appendix containing 
addresses delivered by him on various occasions, by Joseph Smith, Boston, 
1910. 8° pp. 166, port. 

The son of an Irish emigrant, the grandson of a victim of the rebellion of 
1798, Thomas J. Gargan was born in Boston, and the love of freedom for all 
races was his birthright. The addresses included are an oration delivered 
July 4, 1885, eulogies in honor of the late Hon. William Gaston and Hon. P. A. 
Collins, and a speech at the presentation of the O'Reilly monument. 

In Memoriam Frederic Wolters Huidekoper. Memorial papers of the Society of 
Colonial Wars in the District of Columbia, Nov. 6, 1910, by Frederic Lours 
Huidekoper. 8° pp. 42+2, port. 

Mr. Huidekoper belonged to the American branch of an ancient Dutch family, 
and was a prominent railroad official. He graduated from Harvard in 1862, and 
the next year enlisted as captain in the 58th Pennsylvania Regiment. Events 
of his life in chronological order (including family record) are printed in the 
supplement. 

TJie Melvin Memorial, Sleepy Hollow Cemetery, Concord, Massachusetts. A 
brother's tribute. Exercises at dedication, June 16, 1909. Alfred S. Roe, 
editor. Riverside Press, Cambridge, 1910. 8°. 

Sleepy Hollow, the resting place of so many of our noted dead, has lately 
been adorned by the beautiful ll Mourning Victory," by French, which was 



1911] 



Booh Notices 199 



erected by Joseph C. Melvin in memory of his three brothers who lost their 
lives in the Civil War. The dedication exercises are given in full and are fol- 
lowed by a sketch of the 1st Mass. Heavy Artillery, to which the brothers 
belonged. An interesting feature of the book is the publication of a diary 
written by Samuel Melvin while at Andersonville, where he died. 

Gilbert Thompson. Memorial papers of the Society of Colonial Wars in the District 
of Columbia, Nov. 5, 1910, by Marcus Benjamin. 8° pp. 16, port. 
This memorial honors the historian of the Society, 1900. Mr. Thompson was 
a native of Massachusetts, a geographer of the U. S. Geological Survey, and 
died at Washington in 1909. His ancestors served in the French and Indian 
wars, in the Revolution, and in the War of 1812. He, himself, was a veteran of 
the Civil War. 

Heralds of a Liberal Faith. Vol. I, The Prophets. Vol. II, The Pioneers. 
Vol. Ill, The Preachers. Edited with an introduction by Samuel A. Elliot. 
Boston, American Unitarian Association, 1910. 

Volume one commemorates the New England ministers who first preached the 
doctrines that opened the way into the larger field of liberal thought which 
made possible the founding of Unitarianism. Volume two gives the achieve- 
ments of Henry Ware, Nathaniel Thayer, James Freeman, William Ellery Chan- 
ning, and nearly one hundred more who can be called " The Pioneers." Volume 
three brings the record of the Unitarian church down to 1900, and gives biogra- 
phies of the great preachers, written by others no less great, who made the 
advances in liberal faith during the last half of the nineteenth century. 

History of the Town of Andover, New Hampshire, 1751-1906. Prepared by 
John R. Eastman. In two parts. Part I, Narrative; Part II, Genealogical. 
Concord, N. H., printed by the Rumford Printing Co., 1910. 8° pp. 450, illus. 
This town history is admirably adapted for the use of the genealogist, as it 
contains lists of early tax-payers, locations of land-holders and residents, vital 
statistics from town, cemetery, and private records, shares, lots, and ranges as 
laid out by proprietors, with maps. A list of Andover soldiers in six wars, 
from the Louisburg campaign to the Spanish war, will interest members of patri- 
otic societies. Andover, previous to 1779, was known as Brownstown, Emerys- 
town, and New Breton. A portion was set off to form the town of Franklin in 
1828. 

Arecord of the streets, alleys, places, etc., in the City of Boston, compiled under 
the direction of the street commissioner and printed by order of the City Council; 
with an appendix containing a description of the boundary line of the city and 
also a description of the changes which have been made in it by annexations, 
etc., from the date of the settlement of the town to 1910. City of Boston, 
printing department, 1910. 8° pp. 543. 

The present volume is the second edition of the " Record," and the fourth 
publication of a catalogue of streets in any form. The dates of the original 
naming of streets, old and new names since applied to them, and data in regard 
to new layouts and discontinuances of thoroughfares, are carefully recorded. 

The Holland Land Co. and Canal Construction in Western New York. Buffalo- 
Black Rock Harbor papers, journals, and documents. Buffalo Historical So- 
ciety publications, Vol. 14. Edited by Frank H. Severance. Buffalo, N. Y., 
1910. 8° pp. 14+496, illus. 

The book opens with a series of letters written by Gov. Clinton and others 
prominent in the construction of the Erie canal. The second article, " The Erie 
Canal and the settlement of the West," is by Lois Kimball Matthews, Ph.D., of 
Vassar College. This is followed by journals describing journeys by canal in 
1826 and 1829 by George W. Clinton and Col. William Leete Stone. Another 
paper is a tribute to Israel T. Hatch, through whose efforts canal contract frauds 
were exposed and corrected. The Buffalo and Black Rock Harbor papers relate 
to the western terminus of the canal. These original documents, now printed 
in full for the first time, are valuable additions to Americana, and will doubtless 
find many readers. 

VOL. LXV. 14 



200 Booh Notices [April 

Proceedings of the Bunker Hill Monument Association at the annual meeting, 
June 17, 1910. Boston, published by the Association, 1910. 8° pp. 82, illus. 

Besides the record of the business transacted at the meeting, this book con- 
tains a letter from Miss Eliza S. Quincy, giving reminiscenses of the ceremonies 
at the laying of the corner-stone of the monument hi 1825, an address by Hon. 
Curtis Guild, Jr., and another by Prof. Archer Butler Hurlbert relating* to the 
Battles of Bunker Hill and Dorchester Heights. 

Ye Okie Meeting House. Addresses and verses relating to the meeting-house, 
Burlington, Middlesex Co., Mass., built 1732; and other historical addresses, 
by Martha E. Sewall Curtis. Boston, Anchor Linotype Printing Co., 1909. 
12° pp. 62, illus. 

This book contains an historical address delivered at the 175th anniversary, 
in 1907, of the building of the meeting-house, at the one hundredth anniversary, 
in 1899, of the incorporation of the town of Burlington, and upon other his- 
torical occasions. 

Annals of Centerdale in the town of North Providence, B. I. Its past and present, 
1636-1909, by Frank C. Angell. [Central Falls, R. I., press of E. L. 
Freeman Company.] 8° pp. 196, illus. Price $2.50. Address the author, 
Centerdale, R. I. 

Chapters in this book relate to the original land grants, the revolutionary 
powder-mill, the first house, and other buildings, war records, biographical 
sketches, etc. Referring to early land owners, a few genealogies are incident- 
ally introduced. 

Notable Men of Chicago and their City. Chicago Daily Journal, publisher, 1910. 
4° pp. 414, illus. 

This book is full of portraits of young men, those born before 1850 being the 
exception, and under every portrait is a biographical sketch. Interspersed 
throughout the volume are fine pictures of city streets and buildings. It is 
published especially to aid newspaper artists and biographers, and is well 
executed. 

Old Dartmouth Historical Sketches, Nos. 24-28. Being the proceedings of the 
meetings of the Old Dartmouth Historical Society, Water Street, New Bed- 
ford. 8° pp. 12 each, illus. Price 10c. each. Address the Secretary of the. 
Society, or Hutchinson's Book Store, New Bedford, Mass. 

Nos. 24 and 27 contain reports read at annual meetings, 1909 and 1910; No. 
25, papers on " Homesteads of Apponegansett before 1710" and "Five Johns 
of Old Dartmouth"; No. 26, "William Bradford, 1823-1892," "Early Tripps 
of New England"; No. 27, "The Old Men of Fairhaven." 

Becord of the Courts of Chester County, Pennsylvania, begun ye 13th of Septem- 
ber, 1681, ending the 10th day of March 1696-7. Published by the Colonial 
Society of Pennsylvania, 1910. 4° pp. 430. 

The original record is in the office of the Prothonotary of Chester County, at 
"West Chester, Pa. This follows the Upland Court Record. 1676-1681, now in; 
the possession of the Historical Society of Pennsylvania. This publication hi 
a well-arranged index. 

Golden New England, by Sylvester Baxter. Distributed free by N. W. Har-J 
ris & Co., 35 Federal Street, Boston, Mass. n. d. 8° pp. 12, Illus. 
This little pamphlet dispels the idea that only the West is " golden," and tells] 

about scientific farming in Massachusetts; making especial mention of the! 

Massachusetts Agricultural College and the growing industry of fruit produc-j 

tion in New England. 

Fairclough Hall, Weston, and its oicners. Published by the East Herts Archae-J 
ological Society, Bishop's Stortford, Hertfordshire, England, n. t. p. 8° pp. 11, 
chart. 

This extract from the Proceedings for 1908-9, pages 57 to 67, inclusive, con-j 
tains a description of the ancient farm-house at Hall's Green (probably an ab-j 
breviation of Fairclough Hall Green), besides references to the seventeenth! 






1911] 



Booh Notices 201 



century maps of the vicinity. A chart compiled from various Visitations is the 
basis of the remainder of the article, which treats of members of the Fairclough 
family previous to 1634. 

Fort Jefferson and its Commander, 1861-2, by Jostah H. Shinn. Reprinted 
from The Journal of the Military Service Institution. Governor's Island, 
N. Y., 1910. 8° pp. 25, illus. 

Gen. Lewis G. Arnold, the commander referred to, was a graduate of West 
Point, 1837, and a veteran of the Seminole and Mexican wars. His work in 
completing and garrisoning Fort Jefferson, thereby making it " the Gibraltar of 
the Gulf," and the effect of a Federal stronghold in that strategic location, are 
ably set forth in letters, official papers, and personal reminiscences. 

The Proceedings and Transactions of the Nova Scotian Institute, of Science, 
Halifax, Nova Scotia. Vol. XII, part 2. Sessions of 1907-1908. Halifax, 
printed for the Institute by the McAlpine Publishing Co., Ltd., 1910. 8° pp. 
xxxi-xlv, 139-21G ; appendix v-viii, illus. Price to non-members 50 cents. 

This publication contains reports of the annual meeting, 1907, obituaries of 
deceased members, articles on various scientific subjects, and a list of papers 
delivered before the Society. It concludes with a list of members, 1907-08, and 
a list of presidents of the Institute since its foundation in 18G2. 

Hyde Park Historical Record, Vol. VII, 1909. William A. Mowry, Editor. 
Published by the Hyde Park Historical Society, Hyde Park, Mass. [1909.] 
8° pp. G3, illus. 

The frontispiece represents the First Baptist Church of Hyde Park, and the 
first article in the publication is a history of the church organization by Miss 
Jennie M. Stone. Mr. Franklin H. Dean contributes a paper on "Undercur- 
rents of the Great Rebellion." lt The Great American Desert and its Develop- 
ment," with maps, by Gen. Henry B. Carrington, and " Concerning Roger Wil- 
iams," by the Editor, are well written and instructive. 

Report of the Historical Secretary of the Old Settler and Historical Association 
of Lake County, Indiana, from 1906 to 1910. Printed in accordance with 
the vote of the Association, August 25, 1909. Crown Point, Indiana, 1910. 
12° pp. 95. 

This little book continues the series begun in 1885. A large space is given to 
)bituary notices of old settlers, and current events of local interest are pre- 
sented in diary form. There is an index which adds very much to the value of 
he book. 

The History of King's County, Nova Scotia, heart of the Acadian land, giving a 
sketch of the French and their expulsion, and a history of the New England 
Planters who came in their stead, with many genealogies, 1604-1910, by 
Arthur Wentworth Hamilton Eaton, M.A., D.C.L. Salem, Mass., Salem 
Press Co., 1910. 8° pp. 16+898. 

In the territory of the Micmac Indians the French began colonization in 1(580, 
nd remained until dispersed by the English in 1764. Then came immigrants 
rom New England bearing old family names of Massachusetts, Rhode Island, 
nd Connecticut, with others from New York, and direct from the British Isles. 
)uring the American Revolution, loyalists poured into the country. Such in 
rief is the story told in the first five chapters of Dr. Eaton's book, and the 
eader's interest is not abated as he follows the recital into more recent times, 
'he last chapter takes up current events, biographies, and family sketches, the 
enealogies being arranged according to the plan used in this magazine. 

"he Whiting Club Memorial. Lynn, Mass., 1910. 8° pp. 23. 

The tributes in memory of deceased members of the club, which comprise 
lis pamphlet, are as follows : Philip Augustus Chase, written by Henry Fuller 
apley and Bejamin Newhall Johnson; Rev. Augustine Heard Amoiw, by 
nomas Benton Knight; Charles Sylvester Fuller, by Rev. Samuel Barrett 
tewart ; Charles Henry Newhall, by Joseph Newhall Smith ; Howard Mudge 
ewhall, by Henry Breed Sprague. All were men who were vitally interested 
i their home city of Lynn, and all have done some special work to advance her 
rosperity. 



202 Booh Notices [April 

The Milton Catechism; an outline of the history of Milton. Moss. Published by 
the Milton Historical Society. 1910. B°pp. B8, i!lu " Poraaleatthe Milton 
Public Library, Milton. Mass. Price 60c. 

This little text-book of Milton history, geography, and geology forma an ad- 
mirable reference book for those in any way Interested in the to wd. Primarily 
it is compiled for the benefit of the public schools, and contain- references to 
authorities which may be consulted for further study. 

Minutes of tit < Execui im-ii Province of Nets Fork. Administration 

of Fran. . 166S- 1 ' . Vol. I. Minutes. Collateral and illuttrai 

docu\ i-.xi.x. edited by Victoh Hi «... I'm rem, State Historian. Pub- 

lished by the State ol Rem fork, Albany, 1910. *• pp . Ulna. 

This publication coven one hundred and forty-nine pages of a small folio 
volume, which has been printed literatim. It Is supplemented by foot-notes, 
explanatory documents, and maps. 

Genealogical and Family History of YorthemNeu} Tort. .1 rec 
ments of her people in do Making < nmonwealth a\ inding of 4 

< emptied under the editorial Bupervision of William Richard Ci i- 
1 1 1:. \ If. n< m Fork, Lewis Historioal Publishing Co., 1910. - Is. 4° pp. 
1147, Ulus. 

These volumes give the genealogy of prominent men of northern \< w York, 
and arc Illustrated by portraita. The index is well arranged, and Is found in 
tin- third volume. As male and female lines are traced, many tamiles are In- 
eluded whose surnames do not appear in t : ion mentioned above. 

M( > and defeatii its in the state 

f New York A s 777s 1 Vol 3 I i Heal In- 

(/., lited by Viotob Hugo Paltsits, Stat d. Published by the 

State i i ork, Albany, 1910 »■ p] 

general plan of this index was d.\:-.d bj tl State Historian, who per- 
sonally Indexed the first half of the book, the remainder being completed i>y Dr. 
EUchard B. Day, chief clerk. Under the caption ■• Commissioners for detecting 
and d< Dg cons] which fills aboiii >{u- finds a con- 

densed history ol doiiiL' ' body ' Februan 177s and 1781. 

The searcher for Information in regard to tin tween patriot and tory 

during the American Revolution, will iind it. as the historian Miu'^^ts --an a 
ceptablc magnet with which 0TS from a rich miin 

( V I /. I // and ///. edited by W. P. W. Phillimore, 

M \ . B.( i Nottinghamshire, Vol. I. London, Phlllim 144 

i bancery Lane. I9S, illu>. : net. 

Ml 11 contains a list o - riffs oi s ^hamshlre from 173 md 

a list of ma S ttiugham from i;ni to i> - The pedij Include the 

familes of Nesbitt, Wllcockson, Thompson, Enfield, Bonser, Booker, Hancock, 
Bancroft, and Blairg. Part III contains pedigrees of Pierrepont, Musters, Cha- 
w . arth, Grundy, ( lade, Munk, Huskinson, and Bayli I opiesfromse^ eral diari< 
church regisu rs and monumental Inscriptions are printed. 

Baptisms^VA and list of stestoen tn\-> , t from the church rds 

of do li> '•• /•- ad A o' BuA Bobbins, irst minister or' Norfol <n., 

1761-1813. Printed for Carl and Ellen BatteUe Stoeckel, 1910. 3 pp . hi, 

illtis. 

This book is printed in commemoration Of the one hundred fiftieth anni- 
\ ersary of the Ol _ I ition Ol the church on December 21. 1760, and is illustrated 
by a portrait ^i Rev. Mr. Bobbins and a picture ol the Congregational church. 
a list of the original members of the church. 1 7 * ' * » . is followed by additions to 
the church membership to 1814. A lew deaths, baptisms, and a list of church 
members after the death of Mr. Bobbins were found on Loose papers between 
the leaves of the old records and are reprinted here. An index of names is 
added. 

Mordaunfs /.'• cord, Vol. 2. Nbs. 1 and 2. May and June 1010. 8° pp. 22+2. 
Price 6d. per number; by post. 7d. ; annual subscription. 7s. Address Edward 
A. B. Mordaunt, 1 Kenton Street, Russell Square, London, W. C. 



1911] 



Book Notices 203 



The article-- in these magazines of especial Interest to Americans tracing an- 
cestry in England are as follows: Register of marriages in the chapel of God's 
House Hospital, oear Hull, L695 to 1715; epitaphs from tin- cemetery of the 
parish church of st George the martyr. Holbnrn ; wills enrolled in the < Ihancery 
Close Rolls, reign of George I ; memorial to American prisoners of war: dis- 
covery of a long lost parish register belonging to the church at Poulsham, oo. 
Norfolk; affidavit of the marriage of .John Montresor and Frances Tucker m 

New York, L764, and a record of the births of their children. 

Yearbook No* II "f the Oneida Historical Society of Utim . N. v.. 1910. 8° pp. 

40, illns. 

A representation of the home of the society forms the frontispiece of this 
pamphlet. The catalogue of battle-flags on exhibition there follows the list of 
officers of the society, a paper on Baron Steuben, by Rev. Dana \\\ Bigelow, 
D.D., with portraits of both, is the leading contributed article. The mission of 
the soeiet v is to presen e all historical data obtainable concerning the old Coun- 
ty of Tryon, N. Y. 

Transactions of thi Huguenot 8 of 8outh Oanrlina t No. 17. rnhlishcd by 

order of the Society, Charleston, B.C., 1910. B« pp.67. 

Besides the business records of the meeting, ■• Wills <>f South Carolina" is 

continued from t he preceding nn in her, and an add reSS by Bon. AT. I'learw ater, 

on ti The Bnguenots in America " Is printed, 

The Utah Genealogical and Historical Magasrtnt* Lnthom if. Luhd, editor; 
Jobbpb P. Smith, Jr., associate editor. Vol. I. Published quarterly hy the 
Genealogical Society of Utah. Salt Lake City, Utah, TheDeseret News Press, 
1910. B° pp. 102, Illns. 

The first \ olume of this new magazine Is a credit to the editors and the soci- 
ety, and cannot fail to insure success in the future. Bach Dumber contains a 
biographical Bketch of one of t he original officers of the society \\ ho were also 
pioneers in the life of their state. The genealogies are prepared according to 
the "Register plan." and in several other departments the editors have taken 
the Rbgis i i.i: a- a model. 

WhentiiiuiL Monr I >tinly, New York: a brief sketch of Us history, by Gbobgi 
B. Slocum. Printed by Isaac Van Hooser, Soottsvflle, N. Y., 1906. 8° pp. 
138, illns. 

The neater part of this book was completed when the author died. Nov. 13, 

1800. Lists of settlers previous to 1820, merchants, mechanics, physicians, and 
lawyers, also early manufactories, Bchools, churches, railroads, canals, etc*, are 
given space in Bhort chapters. The various villages of Wheatland are consid- 
ered separately. The few soldiers of the Revolution who resided in the town- 
ship came from the east. The names of seventy-five men who enlisted for the 
defense of Fort Brie in 1814 are recorded, followed by the rolls of Wheatland 
men who served In all subsequent wars. The flrsl white settler in Wheatland 
territory was •• Indian " Allen, who sold his farm in 178'.* to Peter Shelter, who 
was followed by other families, principally from New Jersey and New England. 
The book is carefully indexed. 

The Magazine of History, with notes arid qtieries. Extra Number, Xo. 12. The 
Shenandoah^ or the last Confederate cruiser, by Cornelius E. Hunt, one of her 
officers. New York and London, 18G7. Reprinted by William Abbatt, 1910. 
4° pp. 133. 

The originals of the article mentioned above are very scarce, and this is the 
first reprint. The author, a Virginian, was " acting master's mate," but no fur- 
ther information of him has been received. The article is an account of a 
cruise which ended more than six months after the war closed. 

Vital records of Carver, Mass., to the year 1S50. Boston, Mass., published by 
the New England Historic Genealogical Society at the charge of the Eddy 
Town-Record Fund, 1911. 8° pp. 179. 

Vital Records of Framingham, Mass., to the year 1850. Compiled by Thomas 
W. Baldwin, A. B., S.B. Boston, Mass., 1911. 8° pp. 474. 



204 Booh Notices [April 

Vital Records of Hull, 3Iass., to the year 1850. Compiled by Thomas TV. Bald- 
win, A.B., S.B. Boston, Mass., 1811. 8° pp. 75. 

Vital Records of Leominster, Mass., to the end of the year 1849. Systematic 
History Fund. "Worcester, Mass., published by Franklin P. Rice, Trustee of 
the Fund, 1911. 8° pp. 369. 

Vital Records of Sherborn, Mass., to the year 1850. Compiled by Thomas W. 
Baldwin, A.B., S.B. Boston, Mass., 1911. 8° pp. 229. 

Vital Records of West Boylston, Mass., to the end of year 1849. Systematic His- 
tory Fund. Worcester, Mass., published by Franklin P. Eice, Trustee of the 
Fund, 1911. 8° pp. 153. 

General Catalogue of Amherst College, including the Officers of Government and 
Instruction, the Alumni and Honorary Graduates, 1821-1910. Amherst, 
Mass. Published by the College, 1910. 8° pp. 226. 

Class of 1885, Harvard College. Secretary's Report, No. 7. 25th Anniversary, 
1910. Henry Moreland Williams, Secretary. The University Press, Cam- 
bridge. 8° pp. 311, illus. 

The biographical notices are arranged alphabetically and give parentage and 
date of birth, names of wives and children, with dates, beside many other 
facts of interest to the class. The volume is illustrated by half tones, many 
of them portraits. 

The University of North Carolina. The James Sprunt Historical Publications, 
published under the direction of the North Carolina Historical Society, J. G. de 
Roulhac Hamilton and Henry McGllbert Wagstaff, editors. Vol. 9, No. 2. 
Published by the University, Chapel Hill, N. C, 1910. 8° pp. 88. 

The first paper is entitled " Federalism in North Carolina." Chapter I deals 
with the subject previous to the adoption of the Constitution ; chapter II relates 
the struggle for supremacy between the old party and the new, under Jefferson, 
and the practical death of federalism in the state in 1803. The letters of Wil- 
liam Berry Grove to James Hogg, 1792-1802, occupy the rest of the publication, 
and should be used in connection with the Grove letters. 

Quinquennial Catalogue of the Roxbury Latin School, Kearsarge Avenue, Boston, 
Mass., 1910-11. Two Hundred Sixty-sixth year. 8° pp. 61, illus. 

Biographical Record of the Class of 1890, Sheffield Scientific School of Yale Uni- 
versity, edited by Harry G. Day, Class Secretary. New Haven, Conn., The 
Tuttle, Moorehouse and Taylor Co., 1910. 8° pp. 31, illus. 

The editor has taken the most important events of each life since graduation, 
and has arranged his material consisely. 

History of the class of 1908, Yale College, Vol. I, edited by Walter G. Davis, 
Jr., class secretary, S. N. Holliday, and C. F. Luther. Yale University, New 
Haven, Conn., 1908. 8° pp. 411, illus. 

This contains a history of four years in college, a short biographical sketch 
and portrait of each member of the class, and pictures of buildings at Yale and 
of the president and executive officers of the University. 

Bibliography of Class Books, Class Records, Yale University, 1792-1910. Com- 
piled by William P. Bacon, Secretary '58, for the Association of Class Sec- 
retaries, n. p. 

Annual Report of the American Historical Association for the year 1908. Vol. I. 

Washington, 1909. 8° pp. 539. 

This volume contains an account of the proceedings of the Association, to- 
gether with papers read at the annual meeting, also two papers presented by the 
Pacific Coast Branch and the ninth report of the public archives commission. 
Of interest to students of Civil War history are three chapters on the Wilder- 
ness campaign. Other chapters take up the census records and eighteenth cen- 
tury newspapers as historical literature, notes on the Lewis and Clark expedi- 
tion, and a paper on the Viceroy of New Spain in the eighteenth century. 



1911] 



Booh Notices 205 



Massachusetts Society of the Sons of the American Revolution. Register of mem- 
bers, June 10, 1910. Constitution and by-laws and proceedings of the Society 
and Board of Managers. Published by the Society, 1910. 8° pp. 259, illus. 

Besides matters noted in the title, the year book contains records of ances- 
tors of members of the Society, an account of the dedication of the Massachu- 
setts bay in the " cloister of the Colonies " at Valley Forge, Juue 19, 1909, and 
several short articles. 

National Year Book, 1910. The National Society of the Sons of the American 
Revolution. Containing list of the general officers and of national committees 
for 1910; constitution and by-laws; officers of state societies and local chap- 
ters ; proceedings of Toledo congress, May 2 and 3, 1910 ; records of members 
enrolled from May 1, 1909 to April 30, 1910. Compiled by A.* Howard 
Clark, Secretary and Registrar General, 8° pp. 264, port. 

The indexed roll of new members and their ancestors is of interest to those 
who are tracing ancestry to soldiers of the Revolution. The portrait of Wil- 
liam Allen Marble, President General, forms the frontispiece. 

Register of the Society of Colonial Wars in the State of California. Fifteenth 
year, 1910. 

In their elaborate year-book the Society of Colonial Wars has recorded the 
names and short biographies of colonial ancestors and the pictures of the old 
houses that were their homes. Coats of arms and portraits of ancestors in 
the East are placed in contrast with the faces of twentieth century men who are 
members of the order. The book concludes with an account of a banquet given 
by the Sons of the Revolution and the Society of Colonial Wars of California 
and, among other illustrations, gives the flags of the two state societies in 
their original colors. 

Tlie New England Society in the City of Brooklyn : Thirtieth annual report. 
Borough of Brooklyn, City of New York, 1910. 

The thirtieth annual dinner of the society, the spring reception, and annual 
meeting are reported, with a list of officers and directors, standing committees 
and members of the society. 

The Beginnings of the American Revolution, based on contemporary letters, diaries, 
and other documents, by Ellen Chase. The Baker and Taylor Co., N. Y., 
1910. 3 vols. 8° pp. 380-1-387+404, illus. 

This publication, which was quite extensively reviewed in the daily press dur- 
ing the holiday season of 1910, has already found many readers, and hardly 
needs our words of praise. Miss Chase has made an extensive study of her sub- 
ject, consulting public and private records, previous publications, and family 
traditions, incorporating both the English and American views of the political 
situation, and in foot notes carefully stating her authorities. The narrative 
ends with Gage's proclamation, June 12, 1775. 

Numbers and losses in the Civil War in America, 1861-65, by Thomas L. Liv- 
ermore. Houghton, Mifflin and Co., Boston, 1900. 8° pp. 150. 

This statistical volume gives figures and calculations relative to both armies 
engaged in the great war between the states. Citations of volume and page 
of War Records and other authorities are carefully set down, and the index is 
well arranged for reference. 

History and complete roster of the Massachusetts regiments, Minutemen of 61, who 
responded to Ike first call of President Abraham Lincoln, April 15, 1861, to 
defend the flag and Constitution of the United States ; together with photographs 
and, biographical sketches of minutemen of Massachusetts, by Georgh W. Na- 
SON. Boston, Mass., 1910. 8° pp. 414-f-vi, illus. 

An historical sketch of each regiment which responded to the first call, and 
short sketches of commanding officers and comrades of the rank and file, make 
up the bulk of this volume. The portraits are remarkably lifelike — some of 
them showing the men in the soldiers' uniform. Four numbers of the lt Stripes 
and Stars," which was published weekly by the " Union Lyceum" at Parish 
prison, New Orleans, are reprinted here. Several other articles of special in- 
terest to the minutemen themselves form a sort of appendix. 



206 Booh Notices [April 

Ocean life in the old sailing shtp days. From forecastle to quarterdeck, by Cap- 
tain John D. Whidden. Little, Brown & Co., Boston, 1910. 12° pp. 314, 
illus. 

This tale of a quarter of a century of life on merchant vessels, told by one 
who really experienced the events described, has a flavor which fiction cannot 
supply. The characters are drawn from life, and the story is a New Englander's 
career from the age of twelve to thirty-seven, beginning as a boy before the 
mast and ending as captain of a ship. 

The History of the Telephone, by Herbert A. Casson. 8° pp. 315, illus. 

Public Libraries Committee, Librarian, Basil Anderton, B.A. (London), Cata- 
logue of Books and Traces on Genealogy and Heraldry in the Central Public 
Libraries. Newcastle-on-Tyne, Doig Bros, and Co., Ltd. 1910. 8° pp. 68. 

Part I gives a list of books ; Part II is an author's list, alphabetically arranged. 
Books referring to visitations, banners, army lists, monumental inscriptions, 
wills, and other kindred subjects are included under the various classifications, 
and the whole is indexed alphabetically. 

Library of Congress. Journals of the Continental Congress, 1774-1789. Edi- 
ted from the original records in the Library of Congress by Gaillard Hunt, 
chief, Division of manuscripts, vol. xviii, 1780. September 7-December 29. 
Washington, Government Printing Office, 1910. 4° pp. 809-1270. 

American and English Genealogies in the Library of Congress ; preliminary cata- 
logue. Compiled under the direction of the chief of the catalogue division. 
Washington, 1910. 8° pp. 805. For sale by the Superintendent of documents, 
Government printing office; price $1.05. 

This catalogue is based on the shelf catalogue of the Library, and includes, as 
a rule, only genealogies published in separate form. The general Kegister in- 
dex has been followed very closely in the spelling of family names. 

Acts and Besolves passed by the General Court of Massachusetts in the year 1910, 
together with the Constitution, the messages of the Governor, list of Civil Gov- 
ernment, tables showing changes in the Statutes, changes of names of persons, etc. 
Published by the Secretary of the Commonwealth, Boston, 1810. 8° pp. 1148. 

The Massachusetts Laws and Commission of Public Becords, by Henry Ernest 
Woods. Privately printed, Boston, 1910. 8° pp. 4. 

This is a paper prepared for the International Congress of Archivists at 
Brussels, August 1910, by the Commissioner of public records of Massachusetts. 
Mr. Woods gives a plain recital of conditions existing in Massachusetts before 
the active campaign began for the preservation of public records, and of the work 
accomplished by his predecessor, Mr. Robert T. Swan, which has been so ably 
continued and extended by himself. 

Census of the Commonwealth of Massachusetts, 1905, prepared under the direc- 
tion of the chief of the Bureau of Statistics and Labor. Vol. II. Occupations 
and defective social and physical condition. Boston, 1910. 4° pp. xix, 393. 

Vermont Legislative Directory. Biennial Session, 1910. Prepared pursuant to 

Law by Guy W. Bailey, Secretary of State. 16° pp. 596. 

Besides the subjects which are usually found in such a publication, biographi- 
cal notes of federal officers, congressional delegation, judiciary, members of 
the executive department, senate and house of representatives are incorporated. 



ERRATUM 
Vol. 65, p. 87, 1. 7, for full read free. 





*\ 





V. 




CtlwhOTL &CUVL^1JYWV <Ks)(TCLq££> AT, 



THE 

NEW ENGLAND 

HISTORICAL AND GENEALOGICAL 

REGISTER 



JULY, 1911 



ALMON DANFORTH HODGES, JR. 

By William T. R. Marvin, L.H.D., of Brookline 

In his delightful story* of "An Old New Englander " — a filial 
tribute to the memory of his honored father the late Col. Almon D. 
Hodges, whose name he bore — Almon Danforth Hodges, Jr., tells 
us that his ancestors in New England were all of English stock. 
In the Hodges Genealogy, t his direct descent is traced from William 
Hodges, the first known member of the tribe, who appeared at 
Taunton, Mass., in 1643, and who married Mary Andrews of 
Taunton about 1649. But in the collateral lines of his ancestry 
appear so many illustrious names of men who have left a lasting 
impress on Massachusetts history, that we cannot do better than 
quote his own account of his forbears, from the volume cited : 

" Among them of course were John and Priscilla Alden of the May- 
flower. There were also ministers, seven in number, viz : — James Allen, 
Oxford graduate, ejected in 1660 from the English pulpit, minister of the 
First Church of Boston for forty-two years, and one of the wealthiest res- 
idents of Boston in his day ; Samuel Danforth, member of the second 
class which was graduated at Harvard College, pastor of the First Church 
of Roxbury from 1650 to 1671, colleague of the Apostle Eliot, astronomer, 
mathematician, and poet ; Samuel Danforth, son of the last, a Harvard 
graduate of the Class of 1683, minister for forty years at Taunton, Mass., 
where he acquired ' an unbounded influence ' over his townsmen, and where 
he was also ' the principal, if not the only, physician and lawyer ' ; John 
Mayo, graduate of an English university, probably Oxford, minister at 
Barnstable and at Eastham, Mass., and then for seventeen years, of the 
Second Church of Boston ; Nicholas Street, probably graduate of Oxford, 
minister at Taunton from 1638 to 1659, and then at New Haven ; William 
Tompson, Oxford graduate, driven from ministerial labors in Lancashire 
over to America, where he became minister of the First Church at Brain- 
tree, — a rather gentle character much tinged with melancholy ; and John 
Wilson, whose father was a clergyman, and whose grand-uncle was Edmund 
Grindall, Queen Elizabeth's Puritan Archbishop of Canterbury. Wilson 
was a graduate of Cambridge University, chaplain and preacher for several 
years in England, and then the militant first minister of the First Church 

* Almon Danforth Hodges and His Neighbors. An Autobiographical Sketch of a 
Typical Old New Englander. Privately printed. Boston, 1911. 

f Genealogical Record of the Hodges Family of New England, Ending December 
31, 1894. Compiled by Almon D. Hodges, Jr., and other members of the P'amily. 
Third edition, Boston, 1896. 

VOL. LXV. 15 



208 Almon Danforth Hodges, Jr. [July 

in Boston from 1630 until his death in 1667. Elders and deacons of 
churches, captains of military companies, selectmen of towns, and holders 
of other prominent positions were exceedingly plentiful. It was a vigor- 
ous, God-fearing stock in all its branches." 

Two lines of the Hodges family — one known as the Salem branch 
and the other as the Taunton branch — are traced in the " Genealo- 
gical Record of the Hodges Family in New England," cited above. 
The first is given somewhat briefly, but the second or Taunton branch 
very fully. The Salem branch descended from George, who died 
there in 1709, and who, by a family tradition preserved in both 
branches, but for which no documentary evidence has yet been 
found, was a nephew of William, the head of the Taunton branch. 

William, 1 born in England, may have been the one of that name 
who first appears in the Salem records as one of the jury at a Court 
held there on March 27, 1638. If this be true, he did not long 
remain there, but went to Taunton soon after its purchase by the 
first proprietors, where his name is the second on the list of its early 
settlers, made out by the town clerk, John Wilbore. His first 
recorded appearance there is in August, 1643, on the list of males 
between the ages of 16 and 60, able to bear arms. He was pro- 
pounded freeman June 6, 1649, and admitted freeman June 5, 1651, 
on which date he was appointed a constable. He was one of the 
original stockholders of the first Taunton Iron Works, " subscribing 
£20 for a whole share." He married Mary, daughter of Henry and 
Mary Andrews of Taunton, and was probably still a comparatively 
young man when he died there April 2, 1654. The inventory of 
his estate shows that he held considerable property. 

His son, Henry, 2 was captain of the Taunton military company, a 
deacon and presiding elder in the church, and held many of the 
highest offices in the gift of his fellow-citizens. 

His son, Joseph, 3 was a major in Col. Sylvester Richmond's regi- 
ment in the French War, took part in the siege and capture of 
Louisburg in 1745, and died from wounds or sickness on his journey 
home. 

His son, Captain Jonathan, 4 settled in Norton, where he was a 
farmer and clothier. 'He was ensign of the First Norton company 
in 1756, "Captain-Lieutenant" in 1763, and probably a full cap- 
tain not long after, as he is styled captain on the town records. It 
seems probable that, like his father, he served in the French wars, 
though no record of such service has been found. 

His son, Captain Jonathan, 5 "a man of good substance and of 
sober life and conversation," commanded the Norton company on 
the west side, from 1798 to 1801. He served several enlistments 
in the Continental army, during the Revolution, and was in Capt. 
II ay ward's company at West Point, at the time of Arnold's treach- 
ery. He was an assessor at Norton 1799-1801, and a selectman 
1803-6, but declined other high positions. 



1911] Almon Danforth Hodges, Jr. 209 

His son, Col. Almon D. Hodges, 6 of Norton, Providence and 
Roxbury, was" president of the Washington Bank in Boston, from 
1850 until his death in 1878 ; a life member of the Xevv England 
Historic Genealogical Society, and its president in 1859. lie was 
one of the founders of the Boston City Guards in 1821 ; for live 
years colonel of the 2d Rhode Island Regiment (1828-1833), and 
later colonel of the Providence Horse Guards, resigning in 1844, 
when he removed to Roxbury. In 1847 he was elected brigadier- 
ofeneral of the Boston Brigade, but declined the honor. With such 
a military record behind him, we are not 'surprised to find that four 
of his sons — all who could pass the physical examination — were in 
the Union Army and Navy during the Civil War, and that two of 
them died in the service. 

Almon Danforth, Mr., the sixth son of Col. Almon Danforth 6 and 
Martha (Comstock) Hodges, was born July 16, 1843, in Provi- 
dence, R. I. He was educated at private schools in Providence 
and Roxbury, fitted for college at the Roxbury Latin School, and 
entered Harvard in 1860, where he graduated in 1864 and received 
the Master's degree in 1867. While a student there he enlisted as 
a private in Company G, of the 44th Massachusetts Infantry, and 
was mustered September 12, 1862; was with his regiment in the 
siege of Washington, N. C, and was discharged in July, 1863, on 
account of sickness. On July 16, 1864, he was elected and com- 
missioned a lieutenant in the 42d Massachusetts Infantry, and hon- 
orably discharged by reason of the expiration of term of service 
November 11, 1864. He served in various capacities, by detail, 
acting as quartermaster, acting assistant adjutant general on the staff 
of the Provost Marshal General, Col. H. II . Wells, and indeed 
in about every other position which a lieutenant can fill. 

Before leaving the service he was offered a position with rank of 
first lieutenant in the regular army, in a special cavalry troop which 
it was proposed to raise by selection from the men and officers in 
the field ; but as Congress failed to authorize the formation of the 
corps, he had not the opportunity to accept. 

( )n his return to civil life he entered the Lawrence Scientific School 
of Harvard University, "where at the yearly examination he man- 
aged to secure the first place in his class.' 1 In August, L865, he 
sailed for Europe, and entered the Royal Saxon Mining Academy 
at Freiburg, Saxony, where he remained until July, 1868, pursu- 
ing the study of mining engineering. After completing bis course 
there he made a mining and metallurgical tour through Bohemia. 
Silesia, Russia, the Hart/, the Rhine Provinces, Belgium, France, 
England, Scotland, and Wales, returning to (lie United States in 

October, 1868. lie spent the next nine months iii Boston, doing 
some work in the literature of his profession, and then travelled 
through the chief mining districts of Colorado, Utah, and Nevada, 
reaching San Francisco in September, 1869. While residing there 



210 Almoyi Danforth Hodges, Jr. [July 

he was for about eighteen months the editor of the San Francisco 
Mining and Scientific Press, which position he resigned to enter 
into the more practical exercise of his profession. 

From the Secretary's Report of the Class of 1864, to which we 
are indebted for material freely used in the preparation of this paper, 
we quote the following : 

" Although during his studies in Germany he had worked in every posi- 
tion, from that of common miner to the higher grades, yet, as the popular 
demand at the time was for ' practical ' and not ' theoretical ' men, it seemed 
advisable to commence at the bottom of the ladder. He therefore began 
again us common laborer (at $3.00 per day of twelve hours) and worked 
up through all the grades to assayer and then superintendent. This oc- 
cupied eight and one-half years of continuous labor — until January, 1880 — 
and included mining and the metellurgical treatment of gold, silver, lead, 
copper, nickel and cobalt ores, the manufacture of sulphuric acid, blue- 
stone, copperas and borax, and the refining of the precious metals, where- 
by an extensive practical experience was gained in California and Nevada. 
Such experience necessarily included active political work at times, on the 
part of those holding important mining positions. He never held any po- 
litical office (except in a nominating convention), and, although laboring 
under the disadvantage of being an Independent, never lost but one fight 
of the many in which he engaged. 

" Among his more strictly professional victories, he counts the getting 
of $60,000 to $100,000 net profits for his company, from the treatment of 
tailings which assayed only $5.00 per ton, at a time when every other sim- 
ilar establishment in Nevada had failed ; and in finding a successful method 
of refining the very base bullion produced on the Comstock, which previ- 
ously, on account of the very high percentage of copper, had defied all 
efforts to refine it on the spot, or to refine it at all without mixing it with 
other material in order to reduce the proportion of copper.* The refinery 
which he built for his process in 1878, at the Omega Mill, near Virginia 
Cit} r , Nevada, under a contract with the Bonanza firm, was in successful 
operation at last accounts." 

This same year, in his capacity of Superintendent of the mills of 
the Oroya Railroad and Cerro de Pasco Mining Company of Peru, 
he superintended the construction, at San Francisco, of an 80-stamp 
silver mill, the largest and best work of the kind ever built at one 
time up to that date. After its completion and shipment he went 
to Peru and visited the Cerro de Pasco and other mining districts, 
but the war with Chili putting a stop to all work in Peru, he returned 
to the United States in January, 1880. 

" He now took up the branch of Consulting and Reporting Mining En- 
gineering, and was engaged in examining and opening mining properties 
in various States, and in Mexico. This occupied his time for the next two 
years and a half, during which period he made his head-quarters in San 
Francisco, where however, he spent but a portion of his time." 

* This process is fully described in the Transactions American Institute of Mining 
Engineers, vol. xiv (1886). 



1911] Almon Danforth Hodges, Jr. 211 

On July 10, 1882, he married Bertha Louisa, daughter of Wal- 
demar Robert and Mary Amelia Louisa (von Schoemann) Bernard, 
born August 12, 1863, in San Francisco. Mrs. Hodges was a very 
attractive lady, sweet and womanly in her ways, of exquisite taste 
in dress, and of infinite tact. But " the burdens which she willingly 
took upon her young shoulders were too great for her strength," and 
she died at Auburn, Cal., on May 14, 1884, after a brief but happy 
married life of less than two years, leaving one son, Frederick 
Hodges, born June 17, 1883. The first six months after his mar- 
riage was spent in a visit to his friends in the eastern States, and he 
then returned to San Francisco, planning to resume his practice as 
an engineer ; but the death of his wife induced him to retire from 
the active duties of his profession, and he returned to Boston with 
his son, intending to make his future home in or near that city. 

While still refusing to engage in general practice, the urgency of 
some of his friends and former clients, aided by a natural restless- 
ness, led him to make two professional tours to Peru, each lasting 
about a year. From June, 1886, to May, 1887, as chief of the 
Cerro de Pasco Mining Company, he conducted in behalf of a very 
powerful New York syndicate the examination of the Cerro de Pasco 
mining district, the most extensive and expensive mining examina- 
tion ever made. An account of this work is given in the Transac- 
tions of the American Institute of Mining Engineers (vol. xvi : 
1888), in a paper entitled "Notes on the Topography and Geology 
of the Cerro de Pasco, Peru." In 1888, as chief of the Nueva 
Comision Minera, among other matters, he examined and reported 
on the Nueva California Placer Claim, Peru, which, being over 41 
square miles in area, and 5,000 feet deep (from 10,500 to 15,500 
feet above sea level), is the largest hydraulic claim in the world. 
He returned from this remarkable work in May, 1889. Some years 
later he went again to South America as an expert engineer, to en- 
gage in similar duty, which was, we believe, the last important labor 
of that character in which he was employed. 

In the following years he gave much of his time to the compila- 
tion and publication of the third edition of the Hodges family gene- 
alogy, and to tracing various collateral lines of his ancestry. His 
principal literary work is contained in various mining reports, numer- 
ous articles on mining and metallurgy, which have chiefly appeared 
in the Mining and /Scientific Press of San Francisco, the Engi- 
neering and Mining Journal of New York, and the Transactions 
of the American Institute of Mining Kngineers. He was secretary 
of several professional societies of engineers, vice-president of the 
California Civil Service Association, and acting assistant adjutant 
general of the Department of California G. A. R. lie was also a 
member of the Military Order of the Loyal Legion, Massachusetts 
Commandery ; of the New England Historic Genealogical Society 



212 Descendants of Deacon John Dam [July 

since 1890, serving on its Council ; and of the Union Club of Bos- 
ton for the last twenty years. 

To those who were privileged to be numbered among the closer 
friends of Captain Hodges, it was a pleasure to listen to his remi- 
niscences of some of his exciting experiences during the Civil War, 
on the rare occasions when he could be persuaded to relate them. 
Decided in his convictions, his position on the questions of the day 
was never a doubtful one ; yet he was always considerate of the 
opinions of those with whom he might differ. Loyal in his friend- 
ships, eminent in his profession, a wise counsellor, his memory will 
always be cherished as that of a brave and gallant soldier, and a 
courteous gentleman. 

He died in Roxbury on Monday, November 7, 1910, the result of 
a stroke of apoplexy, and his funeral was attended from St. James's 
Church on the following Wednesday. 



SOME DESCENDANTS OF DEACON JOHN DAM 

OF DOVER, N. H., 1633 

Edited by John Scales, A.M., of Dover, N. H. 

John 1 Dam, the second deacon of the First Church in Dover, N. H., 
was born in England about 1610. He came to Dover with Capt. Thomas 
Wiggins's company in 1633, which company took possession of Edward 
Hilton's grant and commenced the settlement on Dover Neck, where the 
first meeting-house was built of logs that year, a few rods southwest of 
where the second meeting-house was built twenty years later. John Hall 
was the first deacon, and at his death in 1 675 John Dam was elected to 
succeed him. In a petition to the governor by the inhabitants of Dover in 
1689, John Dam and Nicholas Dam are among the signers. No further 
mention of Nicholas has been found. John Dam received valuable grants 
of land from, and held high official positions in the town. His will, dated 
19 May 1687, was proved 23 Mar. 1693-4. 

John Dam married, date not known, Elizabeth Pomfret, daughter 
of William, for many years town clerk of Dover. 

Children : 

2. i. John, 2 b. at Dover 8 Jan. 1636-7. 

ii. Elizabeth, b. 1 May 1649 ; m. Thomas Whitehouse. 

iii. Mary, b. 1651. 

3. iv. William, b. 14 Oct. 1653. 
v. Susannah, b. 14 Dec. 1661. 

vi. Judith, b. 15 Nov. 1666; d. 22 Oct. 1728; m. 6 July 1684, Thomas 
Tibbetts of Dover. Children: 1. John, b. 29 Aug. 1685. 2. 
Thomas, b. 2 Nov. 1687. 3. Ephraim, b. 4 Mar. 1690. 4. Eliza- 
beth, b. 8 Sept. 1692. 5. Samuel, b. 8 Oct. 1693. 6. Elizabeth, 
b. 25 July 1696. 7. Moses, b. 27 Jan. 1701. 8. Abigail, b. 2 Sept. 
1705. 

2. Sergt. John 2 Dam (John 1 ), born at Dover 8 Jan. 1636-7, died there 
8 Jan. 1706. He married twice: first Sarah Hall, who died in 



1911] Descendants of Deacon John Dam 213 

1663, daughter of Sergt. John of Dover; secondly, 9 Nov. 1664, 
Elizabeth Furber, daughter of Lieut. William of Dover. In 
the town and provincial records John Dam is called sergeant. He 
was an officer of the militia, and did service in the Indian wars. 
He resided in that part of Dover called Bloody Point, now New- 
ington, settling upon a grant of land his father had received on the 
east shore of Little Bay, now known as Dame's Point, where sev- 
eral generations of the Dam family were ' afterwards born. The 
records show that Sergt. John Dam held various official positions. 
Children, by second wife : 

i. John, 3 b. 11 Jan. 1666; d. in infancy. 

4. ii. John, b. 23 Feb. 1667-8. 
iii. Alice, b. 14 Dec. 1670. 

5. iv. Moses, b. 14 Oct. 1673. 
v. Bethiah, b. 5 May 1675. 

3. William 2 Dam (John 1 ), born at Dover 14 Oct. 1653, died there (at 

Back River) 20 Mar. 1718. He married at Dover, in 1680, Mar- 
tha ■. He resided on the east side of Back River on land 

that was granted to his father by the town. His burial ground can 
still be seen there on the bank of the river. 
Children : 

i. Pomfret, 3 b. 4 Mar. 1681; m. (1) Esther Twombly; m. (2) at 
Dover Elizabeth Tibbetts, dau. of Joseph and Elizabeth of Dover. 

After his death she m. (2) Downes, and m. (3) Richard 

Goodwin. 

ii. Martha, b. 29 Mar. 1683. 

6. iii. William, b. 14 Nov. 1686. 
iv. Samuel, b. 21 Mar. 1789. 

v. Sarah, b. 21 Apr. 1692 ; m. John Twombly. 
vi. Leah, b. 17 Mar. 1695; m. Samuel Hayes. 

4. John 3 Dam (John, 2 John 1 ), born at Dover (Dame's Point) 23 Feb. 

1667-8, married twice: first Jane Rovve, daughter of Richard, 
Esq., of Dover, date of her death not known ; and secondly Eliza- 
beth Hoyt. He resided at Dame's Point, was deacon of the 
church at Newington, also one of the proprietors of the town of 
Rochester. He died in 1730. 
Children, by first wife : 

7. i. Zebulon. 4 

8. ii. John, b. 1695. 

9. iii. Richard, b. 26 Aug. 1699. 

10. iv. Elnathan, b. 27 Apr. 1706. 
v. Alice, b. 1708. 

vi. Eliza, b. ; m. Samuel Rawlins. 

vii. Susannah. 

5. Moses 3 Dam (John, 2 John 1 ), born at Dover 14 Oct. 1673, and resided 

in that part which is now Newington. His wife's name was Abi- 
gail, surname unknown. 
Children : 

i. Abigail, 4 bapt. 22 Jan. 1716; m. Solomon Loud. 

ii. John, bapt. 4 May 1717. 

11. iii. Elipiialet, bapt. 22 Dec. 1719. 
iv. Solomon, bapt. 12 Aug. 1722. 
v. Thkophilus, bapt. 6 Dec. 1724. 
vi. George, bapt. 28 Jan. 1727. 
vii. William, bapt. 20 July 1729. 



214 Descendants of Deacon John Dam [July 

viii. Jabez, bapt. 4 July 1731. 
ix. Mary, bapt. 17 Feb. 1734. 

6. William 8 Dam ( William, 2 John 1 ), born 14 Nov. 1686, married, 29 

July 1708, Sarah Kimmins. He resided in Dover at Back River. 
Children : 

i. William, 4 b. 10 Feb. 1710. 

ii. Sarah, b. 26 Aug. 1714. 

iii. John, b. 12 June 1723 ; d. 11 Aug. 1724. 

iv. Abigail, b. 18 July 1725. 

7. Zebulon 4 Dam (John, 8 John, 2 John 1 ), born at Dover about 1693, 

married, 16 Aug. 1716, Abigail Bickford. He was one of the 

early settlers at Rochester. 

Children : 

i. Sarah, 5 bapt. 13 July 1718. 

12. ii. Abner (twin), bapt. 17 Aug. 1723. 

iii. Returah (twin), bapt. 17 Aug. 1723; m. in 1754, Paul Jenness of 

Rochester. 

iv. Joseph (twin), b. 19 Sept. 1739. 

v. Mary (twin), b. 19 Sept. 1739. 

vi. Zebulon, b. 1740 ; m. Mary . 

8. John 4 Dam (John, 3 John, 2 John 1 ), born 1695, died Jan. 1768-9. He 

married, 29 Feb. 1718, Elizabeth Bickford of Dover. He re- 
sided at Newington on the ancestral farm at Dame's Point. 
Children : 

Joseph, 5 b. 16 May 1719. 
Moses, b. 2 May 1721. 
Issacher, b. 1723. 

John, b. 1725 ; m. , and lived at Wiscasset, Me. 

Benjamin, b. 1727. 

Theodore, b. 1728. 

Jethro, b. 1730 ; d. in infancy. 

Elizabeth, b. 1731 ; m. 20 Mar. 1748, Joseph Trickey. 

Alice, b. 1733 ; m. 17 July 1757, Joseph Place. 

Esther, b. 1736; m. 18 Dec. 1755, James Nutter. 

Olive, b. 1738 ; m. 10 July 1758, Samuel Edgerly. 

9. Richard 4 Dam ( John, , 3 John, 2 John 1 ), born 26 Aug. 1699, died 13 
May 1776. He married, 24 Jan. 1724, Elizabeth Leighton, 
daughter of Thomas of Dover (Back River), and resided at New- 
ington. 

Children : 

i. Mary, 5 bapt. 28 Feb. 1725. 

17. ii. Jonathan, bapt. 14 Apr. 1726. 
iii. Martha, bapt. 18 Aug. 1728. 

18. iv. Benjamin, bapt. 2 Aug. 1730. 

19. v. Jabez, b. 14 Aug. 1732. 
vi. Samuel, bapt. 28 Apr. 1736. 
vii. Timothy, b. 30 Nov. 1736; d. 1803; m. 12 Mar. 1767, Elizabeth 

Pickering of Newington ; resided there, 
viii. John, b. 1738; d. 1814; m. 19 Nov. 1797, Elizabeth Furber; re- 
sided at Durham. Children : 1. Betsey 6 (Dame),b. 17 Feb. 1770 ; 

m. Woodman, and lived at Barrington. 2. Bichard, b. 21 

Sept. 1772. 3. Moses, b. 7 Mar. 1775; d. 5 Sept. 1782; m. Fidelia 
Furber, b. 2 May 1771, d. 18 Oct. 1851, dau. of Levi, an officer in 
the Revolutionary War; had three sons and three daus. 4. Han- 
nah, b. 12 Apr. 1776. 5. Timothy, b. 7 June 1778. 6. Anna, b. 15 
May 1783. 7. John, b. 25 Aug. 1785. 8. Katy (twin), b. 18 Nov. 
1790. 9. Sally (twin), b. 18 Nov. 1790. 



13. 


i. 


14. 


ii. 


15. 


iii. 




iv. 




v. 


16. 


vi. 




vii. 




viii 




ix. 




X. 




xi. 



1911] Descendants of Deacon John Dam 215 

10. Elnathan 4 Dam (John, 5 John, 2 John 1 ), born 27 Apr. 1706, resided 

at Dover. He married Mary . 

Children : 

i. Sarah, 5 bapt. 4 Nov. 1744. 

ii. Isaac, bapt. 4 Nov. 1744. 

iii. Deborah, bapt. 12 Aug. 1753. 

11. Eliphalet 4 Dam (Moses, 3 John, 2 John 1 ), born at Newington 22 Dec. 

1719, died in 1783. He married Abigail Nutter, daughter of 

Hatevil and granddaughter of Anthony of Newington, where he 

resided. 

Children : 

i. Maky Field, 5 bapt. 1747. 

ii. Temperance, bapt. 1751. 

iii. Sarah, bapt. 1753. 

iv. Bettie, bapt. 1756; m. 21 June 1779, John Nutter of Newington. 

v. Nancy Emerson, bapt. 1760. 

vi. Josefh Patterson. 

vii. Susannah. 

viii. Nabby. 

ix. Joanna. 

12. Abner 5 Dame a (Zebulon* John, 9 John, 2 John 1 ), bapt. 17 Aug. 1723, 

died in 1783, married Mary Dana, and resided at Rochester on 

land he inherited from his father. He was one of the leading 

citizens of the town. 

Children : 

i. Sarah, 6 bapt. July 1753 ; m. Hodgdon. 

ii. Elizabeth, bapt. 21 Apr. 1755. 

iii. Mary, b. 1759 ; m. 18 Mar. 1779, John Ham of Rochester. 

iv. Mercy, bapt. 9 Mar. 1768. 

v. Charity, bapt. 4 Sept. 1770 ; m. Joseph Hodgdon, and resided at 

Wakefield, 
vi. Paul (twin), b. 12 Feb. 1778. 
vii. Silas (twin), b. 12 Feb. 1778; m. Lucy Ricker. 

13. Joseph 6 Dame (John* John, 8 John, 2 John 1 ), born 16 May 1719, died 

in Apr. 1807. He married, 1739, Mehitable Hall of Dover, 
and there resided. 
Children : 

1. Mary, 6 b. 10 Nov. 1740. 

20. ii. Joseph, b. 24 Mar. 1743. 
Iii. Richard. 

iv. George, b. 26 June 1748. 

v. John, b. 20 Oct. 1750. 

vi. Esther, b. 28 June 1752. 

vii. Bethiah, b. 19 Feb. 1755; m. John Trickey of Rochester. 

21. viii. Samuel, b. 15 Aug. 1757. 

14. Moses 5 Dame (John, 4 John, 8 John 2 John 1 ), born 2 May 1721, at 

Dame's Point, Newington, died at Nottingham in 1787. He mar- 
ried, 1743, Anna Hu.vking, daughter of Capt. Mark and Sarah of 
Portsmouth. lie was a tanner, and soon after his marriage settled 
in Lee, at Little River falls near Lee Hill village. In 1778 he 
disposed of his tannery and farm to his son Hunking and removed 

a In the fifth generation the spelling of the name hecame changed from Dam to 
Dame, and has so remained to the present time. It is said that in the ancient parish 
records in England the spelling is frequently Damme. 



216 Descendants of Deacon John Dam [July 

to Nottingham, where he resided with his son Samuel. His wife 
died in 1774. 
Children : 

22. i. Hunking, 6 b. 1744. 

23. ii. Samuel, b. 18 Feb. 1746. 

iii. Moses, b. 1748; d. unm. ; resided at Newington; a captain of 

militia. 
iv. Joseph, b. 1750; d. unm.; resided at Durham, 
v. Elizabeth, b. 1753. 
vi. Mary, b. 1756; m. Robert Huckins of Madbury. 

vii. Susan, b. 1760; m. Edgerly of Lee. 

viii. Temperance, b. 1764 ; m. Daniel Emerson of Lee. 

ix. Ruth, b. 1768; m. Israel Huckins ; resided at Strafford. 

24. x. Hannah, b. 16 Feb. 1772. 

15. Isacher 8 Dame (John, 4 John* John, 1 John 1 ), born in 1723, married, 

12 May 1747, Sarah Hodskins, and lived at Newington. He died 
there 22 Nov. 1811. 
Children : 

1. Hannah 6 ; m. Bickford. 

ii. Sarah. 

iii. Elizabeth. 

iv. Thomas. 

16. Theodore 5 Dame (John, 4 John, 8 John 1 John 1 ), born at Newington 

in 1728 (bapt. 7 Oct. 1733), married Mary , surname of 

wife and date of marriage unknown. 
Children : 

i. Valentine, 6 bapt. 18 July 1756. 
ii. Rebecca, bapt. 23 Apr. 1758. 
iii. Benjamin, bapt. 31 Aug. 1760. 

17. Jonathan 5 Dame (Richard, 4 John, 8 John, 2 John 1 ), bapt. 14 Apr. 1726, 

died 3 Jan. 1802. He married, 20 Nov. 1750, Mercy Hanson 
Varney, born in 1730, died in 1810, daughter of Stephen and 
granddaughter of Tobias. He resided at Rochester, and was town 
clerk continuously from 1756 to 1771. 
Children : 

i. Jonathan, 6 b. 21 Nov. 1751; d. at Kittery, Me., 11 Feb. 1840; m. 

Hannah Plaisted; lived near the navy yard. Children: 1. 

Esther, 7 d. unm. 2. Sally, d. unm. 3. Jerusha, m. William Tib- 

betts of Portsmouth. 4. Hannah, b. 11 June 1787; d. 26 Aug. 

1869; m. Capt. John Guppey of Dover, N. H., b. 3 July 1768, d. 

3 Apr. 1865; three sons and three daus. 5. Joseph, m. Olive Fer- 

nald ; lived at Kittery. 6. 3fary, d. unm. 7. Elizabeth, m. Joseph 

Litchfield, 
ii. Mary, m. Amos Varney of Dover, and had 8 children. 

25. iii. Richard, b. 1756. 

18. Benjamin 5 Dame (Richard, 4 John, 8 John, 1 John 1 ), bapt. 2 Aug. 1730, 

died in 1810. He married Jane Simpson, and lived at Newington. 

Child : 
i. Richard. 6 

19. Jabez 5 Dame (Richard, 4 John, 8 John, 1 John 1 ), born at Newington 14 

Aug. 1732, died at Rochester 14 Nov. 1813. He married Meribah 
Emery of Kittery, and lived at Rochester. He was a soldier at the 
siege of Louisburg, and a representative in 1781. 



1911] Descendants of Deacon John Dam 217 

Children : 

26. i. Richard, 6 b. 1762. 
ii. Joshua, b. 1764. 

iii. Daniel, b. 1766; d. unm. 1842. 

27. iv. Simon, b. 28 Apr. 1767. 

28. v. Timothy, b. 21 Mar. 1770. 

29. vi. Caleb, b. Sept. 1772. 

30. vii. Charity, b. 1 Sept. 1775. 
viii. Tolly, b. 1778; d. 1796. 

31. ix. Jabkz, b. 1782. 

x. Meribah, b. 1785; d. 15 Nov. 1856; m. Rev. Harvey Morey, who 
d. 29 Oct. 1830, aged 41 years. 

20. Joseph* Dame (Joseph, 6 John, 4 John* John, 2 John 1 ), born 24 Mar. 

174o, died 25 Apr. 1773. He married Patience Chadbourne, 
daughter of James and Bridget (Knight) of York, Me., and lived at 
Barnstead. 
Children : 

32. i. James Chadbourne, 7 b. 25 Aug. 1770. 

33. ii. Joseph, b. 20 Nov. 1772. 

21. Samuel 6 Dame (Joseph, 5 John, 4 John, 8 John, 2 John 1 ), born 15 Aug. 

1757, died at Dover in 1798. He married, Oct. 1790, Hannah 
Hodgdon, and lived at Dover. 
Children : 

I. Mehitable, 7 b. 1792; d. unm. 1870. 

ii. Joseph, b. 1794; d. 1876; m. Mehitable Burroughs, and lived at 
Dover. Children: 1. Hannah, 9 b. 1836 ; d. 1859. 2. John Samuel, 
b. 1840 ; m. Lydia H. Tuttle ; lives at Dover ; has sons Charles H. 9 
and John Edward. 

22. IIunkinc 6 Dame (Moses, 5 John, 4 John, 8 John, 2 John 1 ), born at Lee in 

1744, died there in 1827. He married, 1777, Abigail Huckins 
of Madbury. lie was a tanner, and lived at Lee, N. H. 
Children : 

i. Nancy, 7 b. 1780 ; m. (1) Moses Huckins of Madbury ; m. (2) Moses 
Davis of Lee ; had children by her first husband. 

II. Sarah, b. 1783; d at Lee in 1843; in. in 1806, William Bartlett, 

son of Josiah of Lee; lived on Lee Hill. Children: 1. Abigail 
Dame, b. 21 May 1808 ; d. at Dover 29 Nov. 1890 ; m. Charles Ham 
of Dover; children. 2. James William, b. 11 Mar. 1811; d. unm. 
30 July 1895. 3. Nancy Huckins, b. 19 Oct. 1813; d. at Lowell, 
Mass.. 19 Sept. 1893; m. William B. Franklin; lived at Lowell. 
4. Israel Charlton, b. 26 May 1815; d. unm. 5. Susan Emerson, 
b. 24 Mar. 1819 ; d. 26 Mar. 1905 ; m. Benjamin F. Nealley of Lee ; 

lived at Lowell, Mass. ; had a dau. Fannie, who m. Hill of 

Lowell. 6. Sarah Whittier, b. 31 May 1823; d. 3 Mar. 1887; m. 
A. I). Cranfleld, and lived at Arlington, Vt. 7. Charles Henry, 
b. May 1827 ; d. unm. in California, 1887. 

HiNKixo, b. 16 May 1786. 
ml, b. 26 Aug. 1788. 

Abigail, b. 1790; m. Charles Rundlett of Durham. 

Si SAN, l». 17!»:!: in. JONATHAN \V.vi><>\ EmEBSON. 

i iii n. b. 1796; d. unm. at Durham in 1878. 
Jonathan, b. I79.s ; d. 1807. 

23. Samuei/' Dame ( Afoses, r ' John, 4 John, 8 John, 2 John 1 ), born at Lee 18 

Feb. 1740, died at Nottingham 13 Sept, L810. He married, 1780, 
Olive Tuttle of Nottingham, born 12 Oct. 17 61, died 26 Aug. 
1831. He lived at Nottingham, and was a tanner, Farmer, and 
merchant. 



34. 


iii. 


35. 


iv. 




v. 




vi. 




vii. 




viii 



218 Descendants of Deacon John Dam [July 

Children : 

36. i. John, 7 b. 21 Apr. 1781; d. 11 Mar. 1856; m. Nancy Parsons 

Barber. 
ii. Nabby, b. 7 Nov. 1782; d. 7 May 1852; m. Nathan Knowlton of 

Northwood ; lived there and had children, 
iii. Lois, b. 27 Apr. 1786; d. 11 Feb. 1861 ; m. Asa Burnham of Not- 
tingham, 
iv. Samuel, b. 22 Jan. 1789 ; d. at Manchester 7 Dec. 1863, where he 

resided; m. (1) Hannah Knowlton; m. (2) Jane Shepard; no 

children. 
v. Betsey, b. 9 Mar. 1792; d. 24 Nov. 1855 ; m. Sherburn Knowlton 

of Northwood. 
vi. Polly, b. 21 Jan. 1798; d. 4 Aug. 1863; m. Joseph Colcord of 

Nottingham, 
vii. Permelia, b. 1800; d. 1802. 

24. Hannah 6 Dame (3foses, 5 John* John* John, 2 John 1 ), born 16 Feb. 

1772, died 30 July 1847. She married, 20 Apr. 1799, Samuel 

Scales of Nottingham, born 20 Apr. 1778, died 21 Sept. 1840, a 

farmer living at Nottingham. 13 

Children : 

i. Samuel Scales, b. 18 July 1800; d. 12 Jan. 1877; m. 28 Dec. 1828, 
Betsey True, dau. of Benjamin and Mary (Batchelder) of Deer- 
field, b. 11 Jan. 1805, d. 14 Oct. 1883 ; a farmer, captain of the 
militia, representative to the N. H. legislature in 1849 and 1850; 
lived at Nottingham. Children: 1. True, b. 20 Jan. 1830; d. 27 
July 1882. 2. John, b. 6 Oct. 1835 ; the editor of this article. 3. 
George, b. 20 Oct. 1840; d. at battle of Malvern Hill, Va., 2 July 
1862 ; one of the famous Berdan Sharpshooters. 

ii. Mary Scales, b. 22 Feb. 1802; d. 1878; m. 1827, Hugh Thompson 
of Lee, and resided there until 1850, then went to San Francisco 
with her family. Children: 1. Frank. 2. Samuel /Scales. 3. 
Henrietta. 4. Betsey Jane. 5. Warren. 

iii. Nancy Scales, b. 18 Aug. 1803 ; d. 1872 ; m. 1828, Daniel Tuttle 
of Nottingham, and resided there. Children: 1. Levi Woodbury, 
who became a physician, resided in Mississippi, and served in the 
Confederate army. 2. Annie E. 3. Leonora. 4. Jay, a physician 
in Astoria, Oreg. 

iv. Levi Scales, b. 13 Feb. 1811; d. 4 July 1847; m. 1835, Martha 
Cilley Bartlett, and lived at Nottingham. Children : 1. Horace. 
2. Elizabeth Ann. 3. Mary True. 4. Bradbury Bartlett. 



25. 



Richard 6 Dame (Jonathan? Richard* John* John, 2 John 1 ), born at 
Rochester in 1756, died 19 Sept. 1828. He married, 5 Oct. 1780, 
Abigail Reed of Smithfield, who died 10 Jan. 1832. He resided 
at Rochester, was Judge of the Court of Common Pleas, represen- 
tative, senator, and councillor. 
Children : 

i. Hannah, 7 b. 13 Feb. 1782; m. 4 June 1807, Charles Varney of 
Rochester. 

ii. Moses, b. 11 May 1784; m. , and resided in Nantucket, where 

he and his wife d. leaving two children who were taken to Ro- 
chester and brought up by their grandfather, Judge Dame. 
37. iii. Jonathan, b. 20 Apr. 1786. 

iv. Mercy, b. 30 Apr. 1788; d. 7 Aug. 1794. 

v. Anna, b. 13 Dec. 1790; d. 24 Apr. 1802. 

vi. Rhoda, b. 18 July 1793; d. 7 Aug. 1794. 

vii. John Reed, b. 14 June 1795 ; d. 19 Dec. 1812. 

b For the Scales ancestry see Stearns, Genealogical and Family History of New 
Hampshire, vol. 1, p. 59. 



1911] Descendants of Deacon John Dam 219 

viii. Caroline, b. 19 July 1797; d. 17 Nov. 1844; m. Stephen Beede, 

son of the distinguished Quaker preacher, 
ix. THEormLUS, b. 12 Apr. 1800; m. 28 Oct. 1824, Mary Baker, "osm. 

of Moses and Sarah of Gorham, Me., b. 15 Aug. 1804. 

26. Richard 6 Dame {Jabez? Richard, 4 John? John? John 1 ), born in 1762, 

died 11 July 1832, married 15 Nov. 1786, Hannah McDuffek, 
born 5 Jan. 17(>4, died Dec. 1855, daughter of John of Rochester. 
He lived at Rochester. 
Children : 

i. Daniel, 7 b. 16 Mar. 1788; d. 1847; m.21 Mar. 1813, Relief Hodg- 

don. 
ii. Olive, b. 27 May 1790 ; d. unm. 1847. 
iii. Richard, b. 4 May 1793; d. 28 May 1879; m. 1817, Abigail Page. 

Child: Daniel JI.,b. 8 Feb. 1820; m. Mary A. Roberts; lived in 

Illinois, 
iv. William, b. 1 Apr. 1795 ; m. Annie Fogg. Children: 1. William. 

2. Sarah A. 3. Eliza S. 4. Hannah. 5. Hattie. 6. Nathan F. 
v. Hannah, b. G Aug. 1797; d. Aug. 1831; m. Elijah Meader; lived 

at Rochester, 
vi. Jabez, b. 5 June 1800; d. unm. 1832. 
vii. Betsey, b. 31 July 1832 ; m. Luke Furber. 
viii. Lavinta, b. 2G Mar. 1805; m. John B. Downing. 

27. Simon 6 Dame (Jabez? Richard? John? John? John 1 ), born 28 Apr. 

1767, died 2 June 1847. He married, 11) Dec. 1790, Margaret 
Hayes, and lived at Farmington. 
Children : 

i. Jeremiah, 7 b. 2G July 1791 ; d. 8 Sept. 1855 ; m. Susan Horne ; lived 

at Farmington ; was representative and senator in the legislature, 
ii. Betsey, b. 10 Feb. 1793; d. 18 Oct. 1877; m. Moses Hand; lived at 

Farmington. 
iii. Jabez, b. 8 Mar. 1798 ; d. 19 Mar. 1851 ; m. Sarah Nottage. 
iv. Polly, b. 20 Feb. 1801; d. 1802. 
v. Tamsin, b. 24 Get. 1805; d. unm. 7 Mar. 1840. 
vi. Janvrin, b. 9 May 1808; lived in Illinois; d. unm. 
vii. Emery J., b. 27 Aug. 1810; d. 10 Jan. 1857; m. Lois Garland; lived 

at Koehester; representative. 
viii. Leonard, b. 15 Feb. 1813; m. Mehitable Rollins. 
ix. Mary, b. \o Sept. 1815; m. Albert Wheeler; lived at Lowell, 

Mass. 

28. Timothy 8 Dame (Jabez? Richard? John? John? John 1 ), born at Ro- 

chesti r 25 Mar. 1770, died at Farmington 10 Feb. 1856. lie 
married, 10 Feb. 171)5, Betsey Locke, born at Rochester 8 Auff. 
1774, and lived at Farmington. 

Children : 

i. Charlotte, 7 b. 2 June 1795; d. unm. 25 May 1808. 

ii. Edward, b. 2<; Apr. I7!;<s; m. Catherine Leathers. 

iii. Charity, b. 22 Aug. 1800; m Ham Garland. 

iv. Daniel, b. l Nov. 1801 ; in. Abigail Ham. 

38. v. Mary, b. 2 June L805. 

vi. Jabez, i>. 7 Apr. 1807; d. unm. 
vii. Eleanor, b 18 Sept. L809; m. Joseph George. 
viii. Betsey Locke, b. %\ Jan. 1812; m. Josiah Crosby. 
ix. Meribah, I). l<; Aug. 1815; d. 24 Mar. L819. 

39. x. \ Seeyer, I). 8 Feb. L818. 

xi. JOSEPH, b. 27 Nov. L820; d. num. 20 Jan. 1886. 

[To be concluded] 



220 First Ownership of Ohio Lands [July 



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1911] First Ownership of Ohio Lands 229 

Original Proprietors of Galliopolis, Ohio 

Following is a copy of a document accompanying the returns of a survey 
and partition of lands in Ohio found in the General Land Office, Drafting 
Division, Washington, D. C., while this writing was in preparation. The 
document is a ms. letter folded and stitched in a leather book of field notes 
bearing this inscription stamped on the cover : 

A Survey of the Tract of Land 
Granted by Act of Congress 
to the French Inhabitants 
at Gallipolis. 

List of Actual Settlers &c. 
Rufus Putnam's Letter, dated 
12th May 1796." 

Superscription on the letter : Oliver Wolcott, Esquire, Secretary of the 
Treasury of the United States. 
Sir Marietta May 12th 1796 

By the papers herewith enclosed you will perceive that the Lands pro- 
posed by the Act of Congress of the Third of March 1795 to be granted 
to the French inhabitants of Gallioppolis, are surveyed and assigned to the 
several persons entitled thereto (as I trust) agreeably to the intention of 
the afore-mentioned act, and your instructions of the Twenty-ninth of 
September 1795. 

Mr Martin 100 arrived at Galliopolis the Second of November and within 
a few days after commenced his survey ; which which he completed as 
soon as could be expected, but from an ill state of health, as he informs 
me, he was not able to make the returns before the 25th ult. On re- 
civeing them I proceeded to Galliopolis, as soon as I could with conven- 
ience, and the several lots were assigned to individuals on the Third in- 
stant in maner certified in the list of Drafts, and I beleave the whole 
business has been conducted to the satisfaction of all concerned. 

Mr Martin states the distence run in executing this survey to be 125 
miles 72 chains & 98 links, and the time necesarily employed in mak- 
ing duplicate plans & certificates 34 days. My agreement with Mr Mar- 
tin was to execute the survey at " the rate of three Dollars permile for 
every mile actually run including the pay of assistents and all expense 
of the survey And for the makeing Duplicate Plans with Certificate of the 
Courses Distances and boundaries ; two dollars per day for the necessary 
time. I have furnished Mr Martin with a certificate of the compensation 
contracted for, also that he has executed the surveys agreeably to the Act 
of Congress and returned Duplicate Plans Certificates &c, to me : but 
have referred him to the Treasury Department for auditing his accounts 
which I presume was your expectation 

I am with great respect & esteam 
Sir Your obedient servant 

Rufus Putnam 

Oliver Wolcott, Esq r 

M Cf. Land Laws of the U. S., p. 223. 

100 Capt. Absalom Martin, Surveyor, who represented New Jersey in the original sur- 
vey of the Seven Ranges of Townships, 1785-88. 



230 



First Ownership of Ohio Lands 



[July 



A List of the French inhabitants and Actual Settlers of the Town of 
Gallipolis ; being males above eighteen years of age or widows, who were, 
in pursuance of instructions from Oliver Wolcott Esq r , Secretary of the 
Treasury of the United States, to Rufus Putnam : by him assertained to be 
within the said Town of Gallipolis on the First (Jay of November 1795 
agreeably to the second section of an Act of Congress passed the Third Day 
of March 1795, entitled: An Act to Authorize a Grant of Lands to the 
French inhabitants of Gallipolis, and for other purposes therein men- 
tioned, Together with the number of the Lot assigned (by lot) to each 
settler prefixed to his or her name, in a Tract of Twenty Thousand acres 
of Land being part of Twenty-four Thousand acres surveyed agreeably to 
the Third Section of said Act and is subdivided into Lots, &c agreeably to 
the Fourth Section of the same Act. 



*± ot Names Drawn against ^ ot 

1 Matthew Berthelot Sen r101 35 

2 Nicholas Thevenin 36 

3 John Baudot 37 

4 Peter Matthew Chandivert 38 

5 Francis Valodin 39 

6 William Duduit 40 

7 Nicholas Hurteaux 41 

8 Peter Lewis Leclerc J r 42 

9 Peter Marret Sen r 43 

10 Michael Mazure 44 

11 Lewis Ambrose Lacour 45 

12 Lewis Berthe 46 

13 John Baptist Ginat 47 

14 Lewis Anthony Francis Cei. 48 

15 Andrew Lecrouix 49 

16 John Baptist Berthond 50 

17 Francis Davous 51 

18 Anthoney Bartholomew Due 52 

19 Philip Agustus Pithoud 53 

20 Stephen Bastide 54 

21 John Parmantier 55 

22 Martinus Vandenbernden 66 

23 Nicholas Prioux 57 

24 Francis Alexander Larquilhon 58 

25 Nicholas Questel 59 

26 Christopher Etienne 60 

27 Francis Duverger 61 

28 Claudius Chartier Duflique 62 

29 Nicholas Petit 63 

30 John Baptist Letailleur 64 

31 Claudius Berthelot 65 

32 Francis Charles Duteil 66 

33 John Peter Romain Bureau 67 

34 James Francis Laurent 68 



Names drawn against 

John Francis Gobeau 

John Julius Lemoyne 

Peter Duteil 

Lewis Joiteau 

Agustus Chereau 

Peter John Desnoyers 

Marin Dupert 

Agustin Leclercq Sen r 

Nicholas Lambert 

John Brouin 

Agustin Leclercq J r 

Anthony Philipeau 

Anthony Henry Mingun 

Lewis Peter Leclere Sen r 

Mary Magdalen Brunier, widow 

Remy Thierry Quiff e 

Peter Magnier 

Matthew Ibert 

J no Baptist Nicholas Tillaye 

Anthony Claudius Vincent 

John Gilbert Petit 

Lewis Augustin Lemoyne 

Basil Joseph Marret 

Joseph Michau 

Joseph Dazet 

Michael Craufaz 

Francis D'hebecourt 

John Francis Perrey 

Claudius Romaine Menager 

Peter Richon 

Peter Matry 

Peter Serre 

Francis Marion 

Peter Marret, J r 



101 The numbered lots are shown on the map accompanying the document. 



1911] 



First Ownership of Ohio Lands 



231 



Lot 
No. 

69 
70 
71 

72 
73 
74 
75 

76 
77 
78 
79 
80 



Names drawn against 

Francis "VVinar Joseph Devacht 
Nicholas Charles Visinier 
Agustus Waldemard Mentelle 
Stephen Chandivert 
Peter Robert Maquet 
Stephen Willermi 
John Baptist Ferard 
Francis Alexander Dubois 
John Lewis Maldan 
Francis Mennessiers 
Peter Serrot 
Anthony Francis Saugrain 



Lot 
No. 

81 
82 
83 
84 
85 
86 
87 
88 
89 
90 
91 
92 



Names drawn against 

Joachin Pignolet 

Anthony Vibert 

John Lewis Violet 

Peter Laffillard 

Peter Chabot 

Peter Thomas Thomas 

Michael Chanterel 

Francis Carteron 

Claudius Cadot 

Lewis Victor Vonschriltz 

Peter Francis Agustin Leclercq 

Peter Ferard 



I hereby certify that the foregoing numbers of Lots were severally drawn 
against the Names before which they respectively stand ; at Galliopolis on 
the Third Day of May 1796, by a committee of the inhabitants acting 
under my imediate superintendence, and that I have inscribed each pro- 
prietors Name on his Lot Drawn as aforesaid in two Plats of the survey 
made by Absalom Martin. Rufus Putnam. 

In another book marked " A." is a plat of the subdivision with each lot 
bearing the proprietor's name, and inscribed : 

A Map of the Tract of Land granted by the Hon ble the Congress of the 
United States to the French Inhabitants of Galliopolis, divided agreeably 
to the Act and according to the Instructions from General Rufus Putnam 
into. 

1 Tract of 4,000 Mr Gervais 102 

92 lots of 217 T % Acres 20,000 

Surveyed by 

Absalom Martin Acres 24,000 

April 9 1796. 



By an act of Congress passed June 25, 1798 (Land Laws of U. S., 1810, 
p. 225), Stephen Monot, Lewis Anthony Carpentier, Lewis Vimont, Fran- 
cis Valton, Lewis Philip A. Fichow, Anthony Maquet, Margaret G. C. 
Champaigne wife of Peter A. Laforge, and Maria I. Dalliez wife of 
Peter Luc, inhabitants of Galliopolis, who were prevented from obtaining 
their proportion of the land granted by the act of March 3, 1795, received 
each an eighth equal part of a tract of 2200 acres on the Ohio River 
" beginning at the lower corner " of the Galliopolis tract. 



102 John Gabriel Gervais. 



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1911] 



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252 James Bourne Ayer [July 



JAMES BOURNE AYER, M.D. 

By Mary A. Rousmaniere of Roxbury, Mass. 

James Bourne Ayer was born in Boston January 6, 1849. 
His father, Dr. James Ayer, a graduate of Bowdoin College in the 
class of 1834, had lived for many years in the vicinity of Newfield, 
Maine, where he had followed in his father's footsteps in the prac- 
tise of medicine. As the field, however, proved but limited, Dr. 
Ayer had removed to a more remunerative district on Cape Cod, 
where he had first settled at Monument, and later at Sandwich. 
This proved a happy move, and resulted before long in the build- 
ing up of a thriving practise. 

Among his patients at Monument was Martha, daughter of Ben- 
jamin Bourne, who subsequently became his wife. Through her 
his grandchildren are able to trace their descent from Richard 
Bourne, the missionary who labored for many years among the 
Mashpee Indians. 

Dr. Ayer had an elder brother, J. Cullen Ayer, who was prac- 
tising medicine at the time in Boston. His sudden death in 1846, 
just at the opening of what appeared to be a brilliant future, was an 
inducement for his brother to remove from Sandwich and take up 
his practise. It was not long before we find the young couple set- 
tled on Hanover Street at the old North End, where in 1849 a son, 
James Bourne Ayer, the subject of this memoir, was born to them. 
The following year another son, Frederick Bourne Ayer, was born, 
but died when only a little over two years old. 

A few years later the husband was forced to sustain an even 
greater loss in the death of his young wife at the early age of 
thirty-four. Although Mrs. Storms, a sister of his first wife, whom 
Dr. Ayer subsequently married, came to preside over his household, 
the little boy never entirely forgot his own mother, whom in later 
years he was wont to refer to in words of reverence and affection. As 
no children were born of this second marriage, the boy's bringing 
up was practically that of an only child. He led a quiet life, and 
was much thrown upon the companionship of his father, for whom 
he had the greatest reverence. 

From 1856 to 1861 he attended the Eliot School, which he left 
for the Boston Latin School. All the records seen of him show that 
he was a good boy and stood well in his classes. At one time he 
receive^ a Franklin medal, an award for good conduct. At the 
age of sixteen he entered Harvard College in the class of 1869, and 
the year following his graduation began his work at the Harvard 
Medical School. 

In further pursuit of medical knowledge the young physician 
went abroad for several years, where he also learned the German Ian- 



1911] James Bourne Ayer 253 

guage, which proved of value to him throughout his life. It was 
during these foreign wanderings that he first made the acquaintance 
of Mary E. Farwell, daughter of Nathaniel Whittemore Farwell of 
Lewiston, Maine. On his return to Boston in 1875 the renewal 
of this acquaintance resulted in their marriage on April 4, 1877. 

Dr. Ayer, Senior, who at this time was living at 6 Hancock 
Street, vacated in favor of his son, and removed to Boylston Street, 
then nearer the medical centre of the city. Here on Beacon Hill 
the young couple settled, and Dr. Ayer first entered upon the prac- 
tise of medicine. A few years later he removed to 53 Mt. Vernon 
Street, where he lived until his removal in 1894 to 518 Beacon 
Street. 

Dr. Ayer led a busy, active life, broken only by occasional 
trips to Europe, the only form of vacation that ever held any charm 
for him. For many years he was busy with private practise, but 
later other phases of the profession absorbed more of his time. Be- 
sides the contribution of articles to medical journals, he acted as 
councillor of the Massachusetts Medical Society for many years, 
and for five years was one of the censors. When it was proposed 
to erect the new Medical Library in the Fenway he was appointed 
treasurer. In 1906 he also acted as treasurer of the committee 
chosen to entertain the American Medical Association. 

The position he held on the State Board of Insanity from 1902 
to 1907 took up much of his time, and during the last few years of 
his life the research work he caused to have carried on in relation 
to arterio-sclerosis proved of great interest to him. 

He had other interests aside from the profession. For many 
years he was a constant attendant at Mt. Vernon Church, and he 
numbered one of the former pastors, Rev. Samuel E. Herrick, as 
his father had before him, among his most intimate friends. 

His chief diversion of late years was his increasing interest in 
early Boston history, in connection with which hobby he gradually 
accumulated a collection of early maps and views of the city. He 
collected a mass of material relating to the treatment of the sick and 
insane in colonial days, which he hoped some day to put in book 
form. The constant changes in the Fenway also greatly interested 
him, and during the last year of his life he was endeavoring to col- 
lect views showing the development in this particular part of the 
city. He was fond of tracing the history and expansion of the 
church in the colonies, and in his library of Americana are to be 
found many sermons preached in olden days by Cotton Mather and 
other New England divin< 

Dr. Ayer was a member of the Boston ian Society, the Society of 
Colonial Wars, the Colonial Society of Massachusetts, and the New 
England Historic Genealogical Society, on the Council of which he 
served in 1908 and L909. He often said that this love of early 



254 Revolutionary Soldiers of York County, Me. [July- 

New England history was to be the absorbing interest of his old age, 
but fate decreed otherwise. 

For a year or two before his death he had been far from well, 
although able to be out almost daily. On the fourteenth of May, 
1910, he died peacefully, at the age of sixty-one, and was buried 
in the family lot at Mt. Auburn, near the father he loved so well. 
Dr. Ayer is survived by his widow, two daughters, Mrs. John E. 
Rousmaniere (Mary Farwell Ayer), and Elizabeth Ayer, and two 
sons, Nathaniel F. and James B. Ayer. 



REVOLUTIONARY SOLDIERS OF YORK COUNTY, 

MAINE 

Communicated by George Walter Chamberlain, M.S., of Maiden, Mass. 

[Continued from page 115] 

Elias Lord, 46 aged 60, of Lyman, July 4, 1820. Private in Capt. Wil- 
liams's Co., Col. Joseph Vose's Regt., Mass. line. Original declaration 
made Apr. 7. 1818. Pension No. 5,723. Reversed. Family: Elizabeth, 
wife, aged 58; Ruth, daughter, aged 34; Benjamin, son, aged 26. (38: 
396.) 

Ichabod Lord, aged 64, of Shapleigh, July 18, 1820. Private in Capt. 
Jonathan Nowell's Co., Col. Prescott's Regt., Mass. line. Original dec- 
laration made June 3, 1818. Pension No. 8,587. Reversed. Family: 
Lois, wife, aged 63 ; Lois, daughter, aged 16. (397) 

Joseph Lord, aged 57, of Lebanon, July 19, 1820. Private in Capt. 
Moses Dusten's Co., Col. George Reed's Regt., Newhampshire line. 
Original declaration made Apr. 7, 1818. Pension No. 11,579. Reversed. 
Family : Olive, wife, aged 50 ; children, Hannah, aged 22 ; Olive, aged 
15; Joseph, aged 12 ; Micajah, aged 10; Susan, aged 10. (398) 

Nathan Lord, 47 aged 62, of Lebanon, July 18, 1820. Private in Capt. 
Daniel Pilsbury's Co., Col. Wigglesworth's Regt., Mass. line. Original 
declaration made Apr. 7, 1818. Pension No. 7,688. Reversed. Family: 
Sarah, wife, aged 58 ; Hannah, daughter, aged 34 ; Dolly Downs, aged 
44. (399) 

Richard Lord, 48 aged 65, of South Berwick, July 5, 1820. Private in 
Capt. Pilsbury's Co., Col. Wigglesworth's Regt., Mass* line. Original 
declaration made Apr. 15, 1818. Pension No. 7,690. Reversed. Family: 
Mary, wife, aged 60 ; Sophia, daughter, aged 19 ; Mary, daughter, aged 
16 ; Caroline, daughter, aged 14. (400) 

Wentworth Lord, aged 64, of Parsonsfield, July 18, 1820. Private in 
Capt. Eben r Sullivan's Co., Col. Patterson's Regt., Mass. line. Original 
declaration made May 7, 1818. Pension No. 7,467. Family: Patience, 

4 8 Elias Lord enlisted from Berwick, and d. at Lyman Feb. 22, 1833. His widow 
Elizabeth was living there in 1835. 

47 Nathan Lord enlisted from Berwick, and d. at Lebanon Nov. 26, 1833. His widow 
Sarali was living there in 1835. 

48 Richard Lord enlisted from Berwick, and d. at South Berwick before 1836. His 
widow Mary survived him. 



1911] Revolutionary Soldiers of York County, Me. 255 

wife, aged 63 ; Jemima, daughter, aged 18 ; James, grandson, aged 10. 
(401)' 

Bezalkd Low, aged 6G, of Shapleigh, July 19, 1820. Private in Capt. 
Wadkins' Co., Col. Phinney's Regt., Mass. line. Original declaration 
made Apr. 8, 1818. Pension No. 5,837. Affirmed. Family: Judah, 
wife, aged G3 ; Sarah, daughter, aged 20. (402) 

Phineiias Low, aged 63, of Newfield, July 18, 1820. Private in Capt. 
Merrill's Co., Col. Brewer's Regt., Mass. line. Original declaration 
made June 29, 1818. Pension No. 8,588. Affirmed. Family: Han- 
nah, wife, aged Go ; Polly, daughter, aged 30 ; Judah, daughter, aged 
22 ; Phinehas, son, aged 17 ; Betsy, daughter, aged 24; Clarissa, grand- 
child, aged 3. (403) 

Daniel Lunt, aged 70, of York, July 4, 1820. Private in Capt. Samuel 
Derby's Co., Col. Scamman's Regt., Mass. line. Original declaration 
made Apr. 13, 1818. Pension No. 10,245. Family: Hannah, wife, 
aged 64. (404) 

Henry Maddox, aged 64, of Parsonsfield, July 24, 1820. Private in 
Capt. Olney's Co., Col. Hitchcock's Regt., R. I. line. Original declara- 
tion made July 2, 1820. Pension No. 10,335. Affirmed. No familv. 
(405) 

Jamks Mark, aged 67, of Limington, July 18, 1820. Corporal in Capt. 
Vanhorn's Co., Col. Henry Jackson's Regt., Mass. line. Original decla- 
tion made June 23, 1818. Pension No. 5,503. Affirmed. Family: 
Lydia, wife, aged 57 ; Salome Marr, aged 29 ; Rufus Marr, aged 25 ; 
Joshua Marr, aged 22 ; Lydia Marr, aged 18 ; Benjamin Marr, aged 14 ; 
Betsy Marr, aged 7. (406) 

David Martin, aged 59, of Limington, July 18, 1820. Private in Capt. 
Marshall's Co., Col. Joseph Vose's Regt., Mass. line. Original declara- 
tion made Apr. 28, \S\H. Pension No. 14,356. Affirmed. Family: 
Sally, wife, aged 57 ; Eliza Martin, aged 15 ; Jotham Martin, aged 12 ; 
Thomas Martin, aged 10 ; Polly Goodale, aged 5 ; Aaron Butland, aged 3. 
(407) 

John Meldram, aged 66, of Shapleigh, July 18, 1820. Private in Capt. 
Samuel Sayer's Co., Cols. J as. Scamman's & John Patterson's Regt., 
Mass. line. Original declaration made Apr. 8, 1818. Pension No. 
10,311. Affirmed. Family: Thomas Meldram, aged 32, who has a 
wile and seven small children [names not given]. (408) 

William Mendum, aged 66, of Kittery, July 4, 1820. Seaman on board 
the U. S. ship Raleigh of 32 guns, commanded by Capt. George Jerry 
Osborne, Newhampshire line. Original declaration made Apr. 13, 1818. 
Pension No. 8,589. Affirmed. Family: Anna, wife, aged 65; Anna, 
daughter [age not given]. (409) 

Mosks Mighel, 48 aged 60, of Parsonsfield, July 18, 1820. Private in 
Capt. Bell's Co., Col. Half's Regt., Newhampshire line. Original decla- 
tion made Apr. 9, 1818. Pension No. 5,693. Affirmed. Family: Eliz- 
abeth, wife, aged 55 ; Abigail, daughter, aged 22. (410) 

John Miller, aged 67, of Limington, July L8, 1*20. Private in Capt. 
Richard Mayberry's Co., Col. Benjamin Tupper's Regt., Mass. line. 
Original declaration made Apr. 29, 1818. Pension No. 10,292. Af- 

^Mones Michel enlisted from Exeter, X. IF., and d. at Parsonsfield July 23, 1833. 
His widow Elizabeth was living there in 18;]."}. 

VOL. XLV. 18 



256 Revolutionary Soldiers of York County, Me. [July 

firmed. Family: Wife Mary, aged 53; Susanna Miller, aged 18; 
Anna Miller, aged 15 ; Cyrus' Miller, 9. (411) 

Lemuel Miller, 50 aged 70, of Arundel, July 18, 1820. Lieutenant in 
Capt. Daniel Merrill's Co., Col. Samuel Brewer's Regt., Mass. line. 
Original declaration made Apr. 8, 1818. Pension No. 5,904. Reversed. 
Family. Anna, wife, aged 66. (412) 

George Moody, 61 aged 59, of Limington, July 18, 1820. Private in 
Capts. Derby's & Lord's Co., Cols. Bailey's & Sprout's Regt., Mass. line. 
Original declaration made Apr. 27, 1818. Pension No. 10,426. Family: 
Rebecca Moody, aged 54 ; Sally Mulloy, widowed daughter, aged 32 ; 
three children of said widow, aged 7, 5 & 1 ; George Moody, Jr., 24; 
Elizabeth Moody, aged 13. (413) 

Edward Moore, aged 60, of Kittery, July 4, 1820. Private in Capt. 
Jonathan Nowell's Co., Col. Prescott's Regt., Mass. line. Original decla- 
ration made Apr. 13, 1818. Pension No. 8,590. Affirmed. No family. 
(414) 

William Morris, aged 62, of South Berwick, July 4, 1820. Lieutenant 
in the Navy of the U. S. Original declaration made March 30, 1818. 
Pension No. 8,381. No family. (415) 

Simeon Modlton, 5 * 2 aged 59, of Newfield, July 19, 1820. Private in 
Capt. James Carr's Co., Col. George Read's Regt., Newhampshire line. 
Original declaration made Apr. 21, 1818. Pension No. 5,721. Reversed. 
Family : Sally, wife, aged 48 ; children, Samuel, aged 1 9 ; Simeon, aged 
21 ; Sally, aged 15 ; Syrena, aged 13 ; Charles, aged 11 ; Frances, aged 
9 ; Joseph, aged 7 ; Lydia, grandchild, aged 4. 

Edward Nason, aged 65, of Arundel, July 18, 1820. Private in Capt. 
Bacon's Co., Col. Benedict Arnold's Regt., Mass. line. Original decla- 
ration made Apr. 8, 1818. Pension No. 2,337. Reversed. Family: 
Wife, Sarah, aged 61 ; Hannah Ross, daughter, aged 41 ; Sarah, daugh- 
ter, aged 24 ; grandchildren, Lydia Ross, aged 7, Esther Ross, aged 5 ; 
Moses Nason, son, aged 20. (417) 

Jonathan Nayson, aged 82, of Eliot, July 4, 1820. Private in Capt. 
Derby's Co., Col. Prescott's Regt., Mass. line. Original declaration 
made Apr. 1, 1818. Pension No. 8,389. Affirmed. Family: Mary 
Nayson, aged 83. (418) 

Jonathan Nocks, 53 aged 62, of Berwick, July 4, 1820. Private in Capt. 
Amos Emerson's Co., Col. J. Cilley's Regt., Newhampshire line. Origi- 
nal declaration made Apr. 15, 1818. Pension No. 11,576. Reversed. 
Family : Betsy, wife, aged 59 ; Olive, daughter, aged 23 ; Eunice, aged 
21; Dosia, aged 18. (419) 

Silvanus Nocks, aged $2, of Lyman, July 18, 1820. Private in Capt. 
Wentworth's Co., Col. Poor's Regt., Newhampshire line. Original decla- 
ration made Apr. 13, 1818. Pension No. 14,361. Affirmed. Family : 
Hannah, wife, aged 57 ; Hannah, daughter, aged 27 ; Silvanus, son, aged 
15 ; Mary, daughter, aged 13. (420) 

Jonathan Nowell, aged 73, of Berwick, July 18, 1820. Capt. in Col. 
William Prescott's Regt., Mass. line. Original declaration made Mar. 

50 Lieut. Lemuel Miller enlisted from Arundel, and was living in Kennebunkport in 
1835. 

51 George Moody enlisted from Saco, and was living in Limington in 1835. 
6 2 Simeon Moulton enlisted from Exeter, N. II., and d. at Newfield, Me., Apr. 10, 

1834. His widow Sally was living there in 1835. 
53 Jonathan Knox enlisted from Berwick, and was living there in 1836. 



1911] JR evolutionary Soldiers of York County, Me. 257 

26, 1818. Pension No. 7,731. Affirmed. Family: Elizabeth, wife, 
aged 72. (421) 
Mark Nowell, aged 58, of Berwick, July 4, 1820. Private in Capt. 
Huntriss' Co., Col. Henry Jackson's liegt., Mass. line. Original decla- 
ration made Apr. 15, 1818. Pension No. 11,575. Reversed. Family. 
Betsy, wife, aged 57 ; Lavina, daughter, aged 28 ; Sally, aged 26, daugh- 
ter ; Lydia, daughter, aged 19; Eliza, daughter, aged 10. (422) 
John O'Brian, 54 aged 59, of Cornish, July 18, 1820. Private in Capt. 
John Burnham's Co., Col. Michael Jackson's Regt., Mass. line. Origi- 
nal declaration made June 17, 1818. Pension No. 12, #61. Reversed. 
Family : Abigail, wife, aged 49 ; John O'Brian, Jr., aged 18 ; William 
O'Brian, aged 16^; Abigail O'Brian, aged 15; Oliver O'Brian, aged 
13; Margery O'Brian, aged 11; Daniel O'Brian, aged 9 J ; Anna 
O'Brian, aged 8; Martha O'Brian, aged 5. (423) 
Samuel Odiorne, aged 62, of Kittery, July 4, 1820. Seaman on board 
U. S. sloop of war Ranger, commanded by Col. John Paul Jones, New- 
hampshire line. Original declaration made Apr. 13, 1818. Pension 
No. 8,591. Affirmed. Family. Sanpeire, wife, aged 52. (424) 

James Osborne, 55 aged 61, of Wells, July 5, 1820. Fifer in Capt. Elijah 
Danforth's Co., Col. Thomas Nixon's Regt., Mass. line. Original decla- 
ration made Apr. 9, 181- [1818?]. Pension No. 5,931. Reversed. 
Family : Nancy, wife, aged 5 ( J ; Mary, daughter, aged 34. (425) 

John Patch, aged 77, of Eliot, July 4, 1820. Private in Capt. Silas 
Burbank's Co., Col. Samuel Brewer's Regt., Mass. line. Original decla- 
ration made Apr. 13, 1818. Pension No. 8,593. Affirmed. No family ; 
" wife left him 25 or 30 years ago." (426) 

Allen Peare, aged 73, of Parsonsfield, July 18, 1820. Private in 
Capt. Daniel Merrill's Co., Col. Samuel Brewer's Regt., Mass. line. 

Original declaration made Apr. 27, 1818. Pension No Not 

granted. Family: Mary, wife, aged 71; Lovey, daughter, aged 47; 
Betsy, daughter [age not given]. (427) 

Samuel Pease, aged GG, of Parsonsfield, July 19, 1820. Drum major 
in Capt. Joshua Abbot's Co., Col. John Stark's Regt., Newhampshire 
line. Original declaration made May 14, 1818. Pension No. 12,650. 
Affirmed. Family: Comfort Pease, aged 63. (428) 

William Perkins, aged 61, of WelJs, July 18, 1820. Private in Capt. 
Samuel Sayer's Co., Col. Patterson's Regt., Mass. line. Original decla- 
ration made May 1, 1818. Pension No. 12,649. Reversed. Family: 
Lucy, wife, aged 63 ; Nancy, daughter, aged 24 ; Lovey, daughter, aged 
21 ; John McGeoch, boy, aged 11. (429) 

Norton Phillips, aged 69, of York, July 4, 1820. Private in Capt. 
Samuel Derby's Co., Col. William Prescott's Regt., Mass. line. Origi- 
nal declaration made Apr. 23, 1 8 1 <S . Pension No. 12,083. Reversed. 
Family: Mercy Phillips, daughter, aged 25 ; George Phillips, aged 
23 ; Mary Phillips, wife, aged 63. (430) 

Amos Place, aged 64, of Wells, July 4, 1820. Private in Capt. John 
Brewster's Co., Col. Peirce Long's Regt., Newhampshire line. Original 
declaration made Mar. 30, L818. Pension No. 8,5y5. Family. Polly, 
wife, aged 48 ; Hannah, daughter, aged 15 ; Silas, son, aged 13 ; Simeon, 
son. aged 10; Enos, son, aged 6. (431) 

b * John O'Brien enlisted from Kittery, and was living at Cornish in 1835. 

M James Osborn enlisted from Woburn, Mu.ss., and whs living at Kennebunk in 18.'',."). 



258 Revolutionary /Soldiers of York County, Me, [July 

Samuel Pray, aged 65, of Berwick, July 18, 1820. Private in Capt. 
Eben r Sullivan's Co , Col. Patterson's Regt., Mass. line. Original decla- 
ration made Apr. 18, 1818. Pension No. 7,687. Reversed. Family: 
Sally, wife, aged 56; Betsy, daughter, aged 21 ; Thomas, son, aged 11. 
(432) 

Michael Rand, aged 60, of Buxton, July 19, 1820. In Capt. Tyler's 
Co., Col. Phinney's Regt., Mass. line. Original declaration made Apr. 
13, 1818. Pension No. 7,477. Affirmed. Family: Sarah, wife, aged 
48; Robert Rand, aged 17; Dorcas Rand, aged 16; Joseph Rand, aged 
12; Isaac Rand, aged 9. (433) 

Andrew Rankins, aged 62, of Limington, July 18, 1820. Private in 
Capt. Samuel Derby's Co., Col. Prescott's Regt., Mass. line. Original 
declaration made Apr. 13, 1818. Pension No. 14,360. Affirmed. Family: 
Martha, wife, aged 60; Lucretia Rankins, aged 34; Agnes Rankins, 
aged 32 ; Martha Rankins, aged 27 ; Rhoda Rankins, aged 16 ; Andrew 
Rankins, aged 9 months. (434) 

Ebenezer Redlon, aged Q5, of Buxton, July 30, 1820. Private in Capt. 
Moses Whiting's Co., Col. Groton's Regt., Mass. line. Original decla- 
ration made Apr. 13, 1818. Pension No. 11,773. Reversed. Family: 
Sarah, wife, aged 56; children, Mary, aged 35; Sarah, aged 2S ; Re- 
becca, aged 23 ; Electa, aged 18. (435) 

Jacob Rhoads, 56 aged (5(], of Lyman, July 4, 1820. Private in Capt. 
Maynard's Co., Col. Brooks' Regt., Mass. line. Original declaration 
made Apr. 7, 1818. Pension No. 14,266. Affirmed. Family : Sus- 
sanna, wife, aged 46 ; Jacob, son, aged 15 ; Nancy, daughter, aged 10 ; 
Susanna, daughter, aged 6. (436) 

Moses Rhoads, 57 aged 54, of Waterborough, July 18, 1820. Private in 
Capt. Felt's Co., Col. John Brook's Regt., Mass. line, " and in other 
regiments and companies " (not given). Original declaration made Apr. 
13, 1818. Pension No. 14,267. Affirmed. Family: Wife, aged 54; 
children, Sarah, aged 19 ; Betsy, aged 17 ; Lucy, aged 15 ; Lydia, aged 
13; Aaron, aged 11. (437) 

George Ricker, aged 67, of Lyman, July 18, 1820. Private in Capt. 
Sullivan's Co., Col. Patterson's Regt., Mass. line. Original declaration 
made Apr. 20, 1818. Pension No. 7,415. Reversed. Family: Rebec- 
ca, wife, aged 64 ; Lydia, daughter, aged 39 ; James Dennet, aged 14. 
(438) 

Maturin Ricker, aged 62, of Lebanon, July 18, 1820. Private in Capt. 
David Place's Co., Col. James Reed's Regt., Newhampshire line. Origi- 
nal declaration made Apr. 15, 1818. Pension No. 8,390. Reversed. 
Family: Alra, daughter, aged 38; John, son, aged 16; Ebenezer, son, 
aged 10 ; Olive, daughter, aged 8. (439) 

Noah Ricker, aged 59, of Waterborough, July 19, 1820. Mariner in 
the navy ship Ranger, commanded by Capt. Thomas Simpson, Mass. 
line. Original declaration made Apr. 8, 1818. Pension No. 11,395. 
Reversed. Family : Mary Ricker, aged 54 ; Mary Ricker, aged 22 ; 
Susan Ricker, aged 18 ; Gideon Ricker, aged 16. (440) 

Reuben Ricker, aged 61, of Berwick, July 18, 1820. Seaman in the 
ship " Ranger," commanded by John P. Jones. Original declaration 
made May, 1818. Pension No. 8,391. Reversed. Family: Hannah, 
wife, aged 60 ; Isaiah, son, aged 17. (441) 

66 Jacob Rhodes enlisted from Arundel, and was living at Lyman in 1835. 

57 Moses Rhodes enlisted from Arundel, and was living at Waterborough in 1835. 



1911] Revolutionary Soldiers of York County, Me. 259 

Stephen Picker, aged 64, of Wells, July 18, 1820. Private in Capt. 
Samuel Saver's Co., Col. Patterson's Regt., Mass. line. Original decla- 
tion made Apr. 9, 1818. Pension No. 10,331. Affirmed. Family: 
Wife, aged 62 ; William, orphan grandchild, aged 12. (442) 

Abraham Rideout, 58 aged 62, of Arundel, July 18, 1820. Private in 
Capt. Daniel Merrill's Co., Col. Brewer's Regt., Mass. line. Original 
declaration made Apr. 9, 1818. Pension No. 10,332. Affirmed. Family: 
Mary Rideout, aged 63; Prudence Rideout, aged 22. (443) 

Samuel Rines, aged 62, of Wells, July 4, 1820. Private in Capt. Nich 
Blaisdell's Co., Col. Wigglesworth's Regt., Mass. line. Original decla- 
ration made Apr. 9, 1818. Pension No. 5,908. Affirmed. No family ; 
"live with one of my children." (444) 

Love Roberts, aged 64, of Shapleigh, July 4, 1820. Private in Capt. 
Eben r Sullivan's Co., Col. James Scamman's Regt., Mass. line. Original 
declaration made Apr. 7, 1818. Pension No. 12,651. Reversed. Family : 
Anna, wife, aged 58 ; Clarissa, daughter, aged 18. (445) 

Theodore Rounds, aged 66, of Shapleigh, July 18, 1820. Private in 
Capt. Hart Williams's Co., Col. Edmund Phinney's Regt., Mass. line. 
Original declaration made April 8, 1818. Pension No. 10,333. Family : 
Mary Rounds, wife, aged 59 ; Nancy Rounds, daughter, aged 23 ; Su- 
sanna Rounds, daughter, aged 20 ; Irena Rounds, granddaughter, aged 
14 months. (446) 

Charles Sargent, 59 aged 65, of York, July 4, 1820. In Capt. Silas 
Wild's Co., Col. Edmund Phinney's Regt., Mass. line. Original declar- 
ation made Apr. 13, 1818. Pension No. 8,596. Reversed. Family: 
Mary Sargent, wife, aged 54 ; Rosanna Sargent, aged 20 ; Charity Sar- 
gent, aged 15 ; Phebe Sargent, aged 21 ; John Sargent, aged 14. (447) 

Daniel Sargent, aged 60, of York, July 4, 1820. Private in Capt. To- 
bias Fernald's Co., Col. Phinney's Regt., Mass. line. Original declara- 
tion made Apr. 13, 1818. Pension No. 8,598. Affirmed. No family. 
(448) 

Ebenezer Sawyer, aged 62, of Limington, July 18, 1820. Private in 
Capt. Mayberry's Co., Col. Tupper's Regt., Mass. line. Original declar- 
ation made July 29, 1818. Pension No. 13,654. Family: Harriot 
Sawyer, aged 23; Stephen Sawyer, aged 16. (449) 

Nathaniel Sayer, aged 60, of Wells, July 4, 1820. Private in Capt. 
Samuel Saver's Co., Col. Patterson's Regt., Mass. line. Original dec- 
laration made [date wanting]. Reversed. Family : Mary, wife, aged 
57 ; Sarah, daughter, aged 25 ; Frances, daughter, aged 22 ; Hannah, 
daughter, aged 17. (450) 

Jonx Scaths, aged 71, of Berwick, July 4, 1820. Private in Capt. Sul- 
livan's Co., Col. Patterson's Regt., Mass. line. Original declaration 
made Apr. 15, 1819. Pension No. 7,735. Affirmed. Family: Sally, 
wife, aged 61. (451) 

Eliakim Sevey, 60 aged 57, of York, July 4, 1820. Private in Capt. 
Whipple's Co., Col. Rufus Putnam's Regt., Mass. line. Original declar- 
ation made Apr. 20, 1818. Pension No. 1,005. Reversed. Family: 
Lucy Sevey, wife, aged 59 ; Louisa Sevey, daughter, aged 2L ; John 
Sevey, son, aged 19 ; Stephen Sevey, aged 4. (452) 

69 Abraham Rideout enlisted from Brunswick, and was living at Kennebunkport in 
1835. 
69 Charles Sargent enlisted from York, and was living at South Berwick in 1835. 
80 Eliakim Seavey enlisted from York, and was living there in 1835. 



260 Revolutionary Soldiers of York County, Me. [July 

Joseph Shackley, 61 aged 57, of Lyman, July 18, 1820. Private in Capt. 
Cogswell's Co., Col. Michael Jackson's Regt., Mass. line. Original 
declaration made Apr. 8, 1818. Pension No. 5,923. Reversed. Fam- 
ily. Juda, wife, aged 50 ; Ebenezer, aged 15; Hannah, aged 1 3 ; Reu- 
ben, aged 9. (453) 

Abraham Shaw, 6 ' 2 aged 57, of York, July 4, 1820. Private in Capt. 
Smith's Co., Col. Putnam's Regt., Mass. line. Original declaration 
made August 2, 1818. Pension No. 14,585. Reversed. Family: 
Mary, wife, aged 57 ; Mercy, aged 18 ; Joanna, aged 16 ; Joseph, aged 
10 ; Sumner, aged 20. (454) 

Thomas Skriggens, 63 aged 57, of Eliot, July 4, 1820. Private in Capt. 
Taylor's Co., Col. Tupper's Regt., Mass. line, Original declaration 
made Apr. 1, 1818. Pension No. 10,247. Affirmed. Family: Lucy 
Skriggens, aged 51 ; Lucy Skriggens, aged 25 ; Nancy Skriggens, aged 
23 ; Benj a . Skriggens, aged 1 4 ; Eliza Ann Skriggens, aged 1 2 ; Lucy 
Ann Skriggens, aged 1. (455) 

Daniel Small, 64 aged 61, of Limington, July 19, 1820. Private in Capt. 
Samuel Thomas's Co., Col. Benjamin Tupper's Regt. in 1777, 1778 and 
1779, Mass. line. Original declaration made Apr. 24, 1818. Pension 
No. 5,487. Reversed. Family : Anna Small, aged 58 ; Polly Coffin, 
widowed daughter, aged 31; Abiel Coffin, her son, aged 12; Nancy 
Small, aged 22 ; Sally Small, aged 16 ; Mary Haskins, his mother, aged 
90. (456) 

Henry Small, 65 aged 63, of Limington, July 20, 1820. Private in Capt. 
William North's Co., Col. Henry Jackson's Regt., Mass. line. Original 
declaration made July 8, 1818. Pension No. 13,768. Reversed. Fam- 
ily : Elizabeth, wife, aged 61 ; Henry Small, Jun r# , aged 21 ; Theodosia 
Small, aged 18 ; Joseph Small, aged 13 ; Mary Haskins, aged 90. 
(457) 

William Smith, aged 66, of Eliot, July 4, 1820. Private in Capt. Silas 
Burbank's Co., Col. Samuel Brewer's Regt., Mass. line. Original dec- 
laration made Apr. 1, 1818. Pension No. 17,495. Affirmed. Family: 
Eunice Smith, aged 46 ; Augustus Smith, aged 4. (458) 

Thomas Spenser, 66 (also Spencer), aged 55, of Limington, July 18, 1820. 
Private in Capt. Rufus Lincoln's Co., Col. John Brooks's Regt., Mass. 
line. Original declaration made Apr. 13, 1818. Pension No. 15,818. 
Affirmed. Family: Rebecca, wife, aged 48; Joshua Spenser, a^ed 19. 
(459) 

William Stacey, aged 65, of York, July 4, 1820. Mariner in the ship 
Ranger, commanded by Capt. John Paul Jones, in the U. S. Navy. 
Original declaration made Apr. 17, 1819. Pension No. 12,403. Re- 
versed. Family : Hannah Stacey, wife, aged 62. (460) 

James Stanley, aged 71, of South Berwick, July 18, 1820. Private in 
Capt. Silas Wild's Co., Col. Phinney's Regt., Mass. line. Original 
declaration made May 11, 1818. Pension No. 8,597. Reversed. Fam- 
ily: Sally, wife, aged 60; Lydia Hamilton, aged 20; Paulina Lord, 
aged 16. (461) 

61 Joseph Shackley enlisted from Wells, and was living at Lyman in 1835. 

62 Abraham Shaw enlisted from York, and was living there in 1835. 

63 Thomas Skriggins enlisted from Kittery, and was living in Eliot in 1835. 

64 Daniel Small enlisted from Scarborough, and was living at Limington in 1835. 

65 Henry Small enlisted from Scarborough, and d. at Limington Nov. 9, 1826. His 
widow Elizabeth was living there in 1835. 

66 Thomas Spencer enlisted from Berwick, and was living at Limington in 1835. 



1911] Revolutionary Soldiers of York County, Me. 261 

Pelatiah Stevens, aged 63, of York, July 4, 1820. Private in Capt. 
Jonathan Nowell's Co., Col. George Prescott's Regt., Mass. line. Origi- 
nal declaration made Apr. 4, 1818. Pension No. 7,740. Affirmed. 
Family: wife, aged 59. (462) 

John Stone, aged 62, of South Berwick, July 4, 1820. Mariner in the 
Navy of the Revolution. Original declaration made Mar. 31, 1818. 
Pension No. 12,671. Affirmed. Family: Abigail, wife, aged 60. 
(463) 

Isaac Storer, aged 60, of Wells, July 4, 1820. Private in Capt. Samuel 
Sayer's Co., Col. Patterson's Regt., Mass. line. Original declaration 
made July 16, 1819. Pension No. 15,555. Reversed. Family: Ab- 
igail, wife, aged 61 ; Lydia, daughter, aged 22; Japhet, son, aged 19; 
Loisa Junkins, aged 11. (464) 

William Stmmes, aged 64, of Newfield, July 19, 1820. Private in Capt. 
John Low's Co., Col. Hutchinson's Regt., Mass. line. Original declara- 
tion made May 6, 1818, Pension No. 11,770. Reversed. "Received 
wound in arm in Revolution." Family: Mehetabel, wife, aged 57 ; An- 
stice Symmes, aged 26, daughter; James Symmes, son, aged 20. (465) 

Daniel Stuart, aged 64, of Wells, July 4, 1820. Private in Capt. 
Samuel Sawyer's Co., Col. Patterson's Regt., Mass. line. Original 
declaration made Apr. 8, 1818. Family: Dorothy, wife, aged 64; Re- 
becca, daughter, aged 27. (467) 

Nathaniel Thing, aged 73, of Shapleigh, July 18, 1820. Serjeant in 
Capt. Isaac Sherman's Co., Col. Loammi Baldwin's Regt., Mass. line. 
Original declaration made Apr. 17, 1820. Pension No. 4,170. Re- 
versed. Family : Nathaniel Thing, Jun r# , son ; " no family, dependent 
wholly on my son." (468) * 

David Thompson, aged 63, of Wells, July 18, 1820. Private in Capt. 
Daniel Merrill's Co., Cols. Brewer's & Tupper's Regt., Mass. line. 
Original declaration made Apr. 8, 1818. Pension No. 5,906. Affirmed. 
Family: Juda, wife, aged 65. (470) 

Ephraim Thompson, 67 aged 58, of Lyman, July 18, 1820. Private in 
Capt. Benj a Haywood's Co., Col. Smith's Regt., Mass. line. Original 
declaration made Apr. 9, 1818. Pension No. 5,881. Affirmed. Family: 
Wife, aged 51 ; children, Richard, aged 15 ; Hannah, aged 5. (471) 

James Thompson, 68 aged 59, of Arundel, July 19, 1820. Private in 
Capt. Samuel Brewer's Co., Col. Samuel Brewer's [sic~\ Regt., Mass. 
line. Original declaration made Apr. 8, 1818. Pension No. 5,922. 
Family: Anna, wife, aged 61; Ellira, daughter, aged 29; Ezra, son, 
aged 17. (472) 

Jonathan Thompson, aged 70, of Waterborough, July 18, 1820. Pri- 
vate in Capt. Jonathan Nowell's Co., Col. Scamman's & Col. Prescott's 
Regt., Mass. line. Original declaration made May 18, 1818. Pension 
No. 8,387. Affirmed. Family: Lucy, wife, aged 74 ; Mercy, daughter, 
aged 40. (473) 

John Thompson, aged 66, of South Berwick, July 4, 1820. Private in 
Capt. Pilsbury's Co., Col. Wigglesworth's Regt., Mass. line. Original 
declaration made Mar. 31, 1818. Pension No. 8,386. Affirmed. Family: 
Mary, aged 72 ; Betsy, daughter, aged 38. (474) 

Joseph Thompson, 69 aged 54, of York, July 4, 1820. Private in Capt. 

« 7 Ephraim Thompson enlisted from Arundel, and was living at Lyman in 1835. 

68 James Thompson enlisted from Arundel, and was living at Kennebunkport in 1835. 

69 Joseph Thompson enlisted from York, and was living there in 1835. 



262 Revolutionary Soldiers of York County, Me. [July 

Maynard's Co., Col. John Brooks's Regt., Mass. line. Original declara- 
tion made Aug. 2, 1819. Pension No. 14,586. Reversed. Family: 
Olive, wife, aged 53 ; Eunice, daughter, aged 28 ; Josiah, son, aged 25; 
Joseph, son, aged 17 ; Sally, daughter, aged 20. (475) 

Richard Thompson, 2 d , aged 65, of Wells, July 18, 1820. In Capt. 
Wilde's Co., Col. Phinney's Regt., Mass. line. Original declaration 
made Apr. 8, 1818. Pension No. 12,716. Affirmed. Family: Mary, 
wife, aged 52 ; Joseph, son, aged 15. (476) 

Joseph Tinan, aged 67, of Shapleigh, July 18, 1820. Private in Capt. 
W'illiam Wyman's Co., Col. John Patterson's Regt., Mass. line. Origi- 
nal declaration made Apr. 8, 1818. Pension No. 10,344. Affirmed. 
Family : Sarah Tinan, wife, aged 68 ; no children ; Ivory Hall, boy 
brought up by them. (469) 

John Todd, aged 60, of Kittery, July 4, 1820. Seaman in the Dean 
Frigate of 32 guns, commanded by Capt. Nicholson, Mass. line. Origi- 
nal declaration made Apr. 13, 1818. Pension No. 8,388. Affirmed. 
Family : Sally, wife, aged 60 ; Jerusha, daughter, aged 20 ; John, son, 
aged 47. (477) 

Joseph Towne, 70 aged 58, of Wells, July 18, 1820. Private in Capt. 
John Burnham's Co., Col. Michael Jackson's Regt., Mass. line. Origi- 
nal declaration made Apr. 8, 1818. Pension No. 5,921. Affirmed. 
Family: Wife, Betsy, aged 56. (478) 

Joshua Trafton, aged 74, of Shapleigh, July 20, 1820. In Col. Henry 
Jackson's Regt., Mass. line. Original declaration made Apr. 24, 1818. 
Pension No. 5,712. Affirmed. No family. (479) 

Robert Tripe, 71 aged 56, of Sanford, July 4, 1820. Private in Capt. 
Hasty's Co., Col. Henry Jackson's Regt., Mass. line. Original declara- 
tion made Apr. 8, 1818. Pension No. 8,554. Affirmed. Family: Olive, 
daughter, aged 19; Robert, son, aged 17; Ebenezer, son, aged 12; 
Nancy, daughter, aged 6 ; George, son, aged 3 ; Caroline, daughter, aged 
10 months ; " wife not living." (480) 

Francis Varney, aged 74, of Wells, July 18, 1820. Private in Capt. 
Jonathan Nowell's Co., Col. Prescott's Regt., Mass. line. Original decla- 
ration made Apr. 8, 1818. Pension No. 10,343. Affirmed. Family. 
Hannah Varney, aged 75. (481) 

Moses Wadley, aged 85, of South Berwick, July 4, 1820. Private in 
Capt. Gray's Co., Col. Jackson's Regt., Mass. line. Original declaration 
made Mar. 31, 1818. Pension No. 14,202. Affirmed. Family: Pa- 
tience, aged 79. (482) 

Edward Walker, aged 59, of Waterborough, July 18, 1820. Private 
in Capt. Joseph Pettingill's Co., Col. Baldwin's Regt., Mass. line. Origi- 
nal declaration made Apr. 8, 1818. Pension No. 11,378. Affirmed. 
Family: Susanna, wife, aged 39; Sally Walker, aged 16; Lovina 
Walker, aged 1 1 ; Edward Walker, aged 1 ; Mehetabel Walker, aged 
8 ; Daniel Walker, aged 5 ; Andrew Walker, aged 3 ; Susanna Walker, 
aged 1. (483) 

Thomas Warden, 72 aged 59, of Wells, July 4, 1820. Drummer in Capt. 
William Mills's Co., Col. John Brooks's Regt., Mass. line. Original dec- 
laration made Apr. 7, 1818. Pension No. 7,713. Affirmed. Family: 

70 Joseph Town enlisted from Bowdoin, and was living at Kennebmik in 1835. 

71 Robert Tripp enlisted from Sanford, and was living there in 1835. 

72 Thomas Warden enlisted from Marblehead, Mass., and d. at Wells Feb. 15, 1827. 
His widow " Ednar " was living there in 1835. 



1911] Revolutionary Soldiers of York County, Me. 263 

" Edner" Warden, aged 53; Sally Warden, aged 15; Ebenezer War- 
den, aged 11. (484) 

Aaron Warren, aged 60, of Shapleigh, July 19, 1820. Private in Capt. 
Silas Burbank's Co., Col. Samuel Brewer's Regt., Mass. line. Original 
declaration made Sept. 14, 1818. Pension No. 10,433. Reversed. 
Daughter's husband killed "in the late war." Family: Kezia Warren, 
wife, aged 60; Eunice Russel, daughter, aged 26; Rosamond Russel, 
granddaughter, aged 7 ; Benjamin Russel, grandson, aged 5. (485) 

Daniel Warren 73 aged 55, of Limerick, July 18, 1820. Private in 
Capt. William Webb's Co., Col. Shepard's Regt., Mass. line. Original 
declaration made Apr. 30, 1818. Pension No. 7,484. Reversed. 
Family : Sally Warren, wife, aged 44 ; children, Sally Warren, aged 
21 ; Jon a * Warren, aged 20; Mary Warren, aged 16; Smith Warren, 
aged 12 ; Eliza Warren, aged 9 ; James Madison Warren, aged 6 ; Pe- 
ter Warren, aged 3 ; Phebe Warren, aged 3. (486) 

Moses Waymouth, aged 78, of Berwick, July 18, 1820. Serjeant in 
Capt. Jonathan Nowell's Co., Col. William Prescott's Regt., Mass. line. 
Original declaration made Mar. 26, 1818. Pension No. 8,602. Af- 
firmed. Family : Patience, wife, aged 74. (487) 

Jeremiah Weare, Jun 1 -, aged. 63, of York, July 4, 1820. Private in 
Capt. Crow's Co., Col. Prescott's Regt., Mass. line. Original declara- 
tion made June 3, 1818. Pension No. 8,600. Reversed. Family: 
Lucy Weare, wife, aged 66 ; Lucy Weare, 2 (L , daughter, aged 40 ; Ru- 
fus Weare, son, aged 36; Betsy Weare, daughter, aged 32; Eben r * Lit- 
tlefield, grandson, aged 16. (488) 

Stephen Webber, aged 64, of Shapleigh, July 18, 1820. Private in 
Capt. Jonathan Nowell's Co., Col. Prescott's Regt., Mass. line. Origi- 
nal declaration made May 4, 1818. Pension No. 11,387. Reversed. 
Family: Sally, wife, aged 40 ; James Davis, aged 14. (489 

Jonathan Webber, 74 aged 63, of Wells, July 18, 1820. Private in Capt. 
Dan 1 - Wheelwright's Co., Col. Francis's and Col. Tupper's Regt., 
Mass. line. Original declaration made Apr. 8, 1818. Pension No. 
5,929. Affirmed. Family: wife, aged 56; children, James, aged 20 ; 
Oliver, aged 18 ; Eliza, aged 12. (490) 

Paul Welch, 78 aged 59, of York, July 4, 1820. Private in Capt. Sto- 
rey's Co., Col. Maxwell's Regt., Mass. line. Original declaration made 
April 13, 1818. Pension No. 12,674. Affirmed. Family: Mary 
Welch, wife, aged 57 ; George Welch, son, aged 18 ; Wm. Welch, 
son, aged 12 ; Olive Welch, daughter, aged 19 ; Oliver Welch, grand- 
son, aged 8. (491) 

Samuel Wheelwright, aged 60, of Wells, July 4, 1820. In Capt. 
Dan 1, Wheelwright's Co., Col. Tupper's Regt., Mass. line. Original 
declaration made Apr. 7, 1818. Pension No. 5,937. Affirmed. Fam- 
ily: Sarah, daughter, aged 30. (492) 

Ebenezer W bite iio use, aged 63, of South Berwick, July 4, 1820. 
Private in Capt. Cherry's Co., Col. Reed's Regt., Newhampshire line. 
Original declaration made Mar. 30, 1818. Pension No. 7,736. Affirmed. 
Family. Dorcas, wife, aged 55; Mary, daughter, aged 8; George, son, 
aged 5 ; Edwin, grandchild, aged 3. (493) 

73 Daniel Warren enlisted from Hollis, and was living at Limerick in 1835. 

74 Jonathan Webber enlisted from Wells, a ;d was living at Kennebnnk in 1835. 

75 Paul Welch enlisted from York, and d. there before 1835. His widow Mary sur- 
vived him. 



264 Revolutionary Soldiers of York County, Me. [July 

Samuel Whitehouse, aged 67, of South Berwick, July 4, 1820. Private 
in Capt. Jonathan Nowell's Co., Col. Prescott's Regt., Mass. line. 
Original declaration made Apr. 15, 1818. Pension No. 5,941. Affirmed. 
Family : Esther, wife, a^ed 70 : Olive Whitehouse, daughter, aged 28. 
(494) ° 

Samuel Whitehouse, 2 d % aged 74, of Wells, July 4, 1820. Private in 
Capt. Mills's Co., Col. Vose's Regt., Mass. line. Original declaration 
made Apr. 8, 1818. Pension No. 7,721. Affirmed. Family: Abigail, 
daughter, aged 45 ; Mary, daughter, aged 35 ; Sarah Spencer, grandchild, 
aged 13. (495) 

Richard Whitten, aged 57, of Cornish, July 5, 1820. Private in Capt. 
Williams's Co., Col. Sprout's Regt., Mass. line. Original declaration 
made Apr. 13, 1818. Pension No. 7,468. Affirmed. Family: Mercy, 
wife, aged 55 ; Richard, son, aged 16; Samuel, son, aged 14; Mary, 
daughter, aged 12. (496) 

Stephen Whood, aged 70, of Shapleigh, July 19, 1820. Private in 
Capt. Moses Whiting's Co., Col. John Groton's Regt., Mass. line. Orig- 
inal declaration made Apr. 13, 1818. Pension No. 14,349. Affirmed. 
Family : Sarah Whood, aged 64 ; Esther Whood, aged 20 ; Hannah 
Whood, aged 18 ; Susanna Whood, aged 5. (497) 

Joseph Wilson, aged 71, of Cornish, July 18, 1820. Private in Capt. 
Daniels's Co., Col. Long's Regt., Newhampshire line. Original declara- 
tion made Mav 16, 1818. Pension No. 14,203. Affirmed. Family: 
Sally Wilson, aged 71. (498) 

Andrew Witham, aged 66, of Newfield, formerly of Berwick, July 18, 
1820. Seaman in the Alliance Frigate, 36 guns, commanded by Capt. 
Peter Landres, Mass. line. Affirmed. Family : Lydia, wife, aged 59 ; 
Abra m * Witham, son, aged 14 ; Anna Withan, daughter, aged 27. (500) 

Bartholomew" Witham, aged 64, of York, July 4, 1820. Private in 
Capt. Samuel Darby's Co., Col. Prescott's Regt., Mass. line. Original 
declaration made May 13, 1818. Pension No. 12,675. Affirmed. 
Family: Betsy Witham, wife, aged 62. (501) 

James Witham, 76 aged 63, of Kittery, July 4, 1820. Private in Capt. 
George Smith's Co., Col, Joseph Vose's Regt., Mass. line. Original 
declaration made Apr. 13, '1818. Pension No. 14,302. Affirmed. 
Family: Olive, wife, aged 56; Joseph, son, aged 16; Olive, daughter, 
aged 12. (502) 

John Spencer Witham, aged 58, of York, July 4, 1820. Private in 
Capt. Burbank's Co., Col. Joseph Vose's Regt., Mass. line. Original 
declaration made Apr. 13, 1818. Pension No. 11,583. Affirmed. 
Family: Lucy Witham, wife, aged 57 ; Martha Sargent, aged 89 ; -Han- 
nah Witham, aged 17 ; Jotham Sargent, aged 13. (504) 

Nathan Witham, aged 67, of Sanford, July 18, 1820. Private in Capt. 
Silas Wild's Co., Col. Edmund Phinney's Regt., Mass. line. Original 
declaration made Apr. 1, 1818. Pension No. 12,676. Affirmed. No 
family. (506) 

78 James Witham enlisted from Kittery, and d. there Dee. 2, 1833. His widow Olive 
was living there in 1835. 

[To be concluded] 



1911] Origin and Development of Conveyancing 265 



A SHORT HISTORY OF THE ORIGIN AND DEVELOP- 
MENT OF CONVEYANCING* 

By Hon. William T. A. Fitzgerald, Register of Deeds for Suffolk County, 

Massachusetts 

In the beginning of the world the Creator gave to man " dominion over 
all the earth, and over the fish of the sea, and over the fowl of the air, and 
lover every living thing that moveth upon the earth." The earth, there- 
j fore, and all things in it became the general property of mankind, and 
I while the earth continued practically bare of inhabitants each person took 
I what land he required for his immediate use, and while he occupied it he 
acquired a sort of transient property therein, but he had no permanent in- 
I terest in it, and when he ceased to occupy it, his neighbor was free to use 
it. In other words, his right of possession expired when his actual occu- 
pancy ceased. 

There was no need of conveyancers in those days. The earth was owned 
in common by all the people. 

But when the increase and multiplication of the race began in earnest, 
it became necessary to establish a more permanent dominion in property, 
both real and personal, in order to insure the peace and comfort of society ; 
because no man would exert himself to build a house and furnish it, or cul- 
tivate a farm or raise live stock, if, when he walked out, any stranger might 
come in and occupy his house or take his crops or kill his stock. It there- 
fore became the custom that a man who occupied land, tilled the soil, and 
built a house, was given a right of property therein. In the primitive 
days men lived in tents, and when one wanted to move he simply folded up 
his tent and moved away, and pitched it again where his fancy suited him ; 
but when a right of property was given in lands and buildings, tents and 
huts gave way to permanent abodes, and villages and towns came into ex- 
istence. 

It was found that a house or farm which no longer suited the tastes or 
purposes of its owner might be desired by his neighbor, who was willing to 
exchange some valuable equivalent therefor, and a traffic in land grew up. 
This transfer or conveyance could be considered either as a continuance of 
the original possession or right of property, or as an abandonment by the 
owner and an immediately succeeding occupancy by the new proprietor. 

But no owner had any right to make a transfer beyond the term of his own 
life. After the death of the occupant the next immediate occupant could 
acquire a title in the property of the deceased, but inasmuch as the adop- 
tion of such a system would be likely to cause a grand rush to seize a man's 
property immediately upon his death, the presumption arose that a man's 
children or his nearest relatives were with him at his death and construc- 
tively became the next immediate occupants, and this presumption or cus- 
tom gradually ripened into law. If the occupant of the land had no children 
or relatives, his servants born in the house were deemed the next immediate 
occupants and became his heirs. 

The right to transfer real property by will was not established until 
many years after inheritances were recognized, but at length it was found 
that the strict rule of inheritance made heirs obstinate and independent and 

♦Read before the Society, January 14, 1911. 



266 Origin and Development of Conveyancing [July 

listless, and also resulted in defrauding creditors of their debts. Conse- 
quently statutes were adopted giving land owners the right to dispose of 
their property by will. The English Statute of Wills, enacted in 1540, 
allowed freeholders to devise all lands held in free and common socage, and 
two-thirds of their lands held bv knight service tenure. One who held 
land by knight service was under the obligation to render military service 
to the king, while those who held under the tenure of free and common 
socage were expected to yield a part of the profits of the land to the supe- 
rior lord. The grants that were made by the king to the American colo- 
nists provided that the lands should be held in free and common socage. A 
statute passed in the reign of Charles II abolished the tenure of knight 
service, and thereupon all freehold estates could be conveyed by will. 

The earliest well-defined system of conveying or transferring real prop- 
erty in England was introduced by William the Conqueror after his invasion 
of England in the year 1066. The conveyance was called a feoffment. It 
was a very solemn and public ceremony, supposed to be easily remembered 
and proved. Every feoffment to be effective was accompanied by what is 
known as " livery of seisin." The livery of seisin, or delivery of posses- 
sion, was conducted as follows : the feoffor, that is the grantor, together 
with the feoffee, entered upon the land or house to be transferred, and 
there in the presence of witnesses declared the conditions of the transfer. 
The feoffor then took a handful of earth, or a twig or bough from the land, 
and delivered it to the feoffee with appropriate words expressing his inten- 
tion to convey the premises, or sometimes, if the subject of the sale was 
simply a house, the knocker or latch of the front door was given by the 
feoffor to the feoffee, who entered the house alone, shut the door, then 
opened it and let in the witnesses and others. If there were several par- 
cels of land in one county to be sold, livery of seisin of one parcel would 
answer for the whole ; but if there were several parcels located in different 
counties, there would have to be as many ceremonies of livery of seisin as 
there were counties. This form of livery of seisin was called livery of 
seisin in deed or in fact. There was also a livery of seisin in law which 
was not made on the land to be conveyed, but near to it or in sight of it. 
If the feoffor was afraid to enter on the land because, perhaps, he feared 
bodily harm from a hostile occupant, he would approach as near the land 
as he dared, and pointing it out to the feoffee would say, " I give you yon- 
der land, enter and take possession ; " then if the feoffee entered upon the 
land during the lifetime of the feoffor it was a good livery of seisin, other- 
wise not, unless the feoffee by reason of fear did not dare to enter, in which 
event he was required to go as near the land as he dared, yearly, and make 
his claim. 

Title under livery of seisin was said to pass by " transmutation of pos- 
session." Under the feudal system all lands were held under the favor of 
the king, who made grants to his vassals, who in turn gave a certain part 
of their holdings to their vassals, and so on. Under this system the occu- 
pant of land could not transfer it without the consent of his immediate 
lord. Gradually it became apparent that the interest of the country would 
be better served if the transfer of real property was free and unrestrained, 
but it took time to bring about this result. 

In the reign of King Henry I a man was allowed to dispose of land 
which he himself had purchased, but he was not allowed to sell so much of 
it that he might disinherit his children. A statute passed in the year 1290 
(Quia Emptores) allowed all persons to sell their lands at their discretion, 



1911] Origin and Development of Conveyancing 267 

excepting those lords who held their lands immediately from the king, and 
even these tenants were relieved of this restriction in the reign of Edward 
III upon the payment of a fine to the king. These fines were abolished in 
the reign of King Charles II. 

Conveyances were not recorded in England until after the Statute of 
Uses, passed in the 27th year of the reign of Henry VIII, 1536. The 
Statute of Enrollments was passed by the same Parliament, and required 
all contracts of bargain and sale of lands to be in writing and enrolled 
within six months after their delivery, but people still desired to avoid pub- 
licity in the purchase and sale of lands, and contracts in writing for the 
sale of land were not generally adopted until the Statute of Frauds was 
passed in 1670, which provided that no contract for the sale of lands, tene- 
ments, or hereditaments should be valid unless the same, or some note or 
memorandum thereof, was in writing signed by the party to be charged 
therewith, or by some person thereunto duly authorized. Even then, im- 
pelled by this desire to prevent publicity, Sir Francis Moore resorted to 
the strategy of making a bargain and sale or lease for a year, which it was 
not necessary to record, and then executing a release to the bargainee, 
which consummated the seisin in the latter. This form of transfer came to 
be known as a lease and release,- and was adopted as the most common 
method of conveyancing in England until very recent times. 

Wlien it became common in England to transfer land by a deed in 
writing, it was the custom to make as many copies as there were parties 
thereto, and each copy was cut or indented, first like the teeth of a saw, 
and afterwards in a waving line, so that each copy would fit into the other 
when it was desired to make a comparison to test the genuineness of any 
of them. This form of deed w r as called an indenture. It was probably 
copied from the system of indented paper checks that were used as receipts 
for payments into the exchequer, and which superseded the ancient system 
of " tallies in exchequer," which were made by means of wooden sticks 
marked on the edge with notches to indicate the amount paid, while on the 
two sides were written the amount, the name of the payer, and the date of 
the transaction, the stick being then divided longitudinally so that it could 
be fitted together again and read, one-half being reserved in the exchequer, 
and the other half being given to the person paying the money. This 
rude form continued in existence until 17&2, when the office of "tally cut- 
ter" was abolished. Most of the accumulated tallies were burned up. 
If the tally cutting system of recording deeds were in vogue in Suffolk 
County to-day, the Registry of Deeds would probably resemble a lumber 
yard. The tally cutting system and the indentures were founded on the 
lame basis as the Chinaman's laundry check, which is torn irregularly, one- 
half being given to the customer, and the other half being retained so that 
the two nuiy be fitted together when the laundry is claimed. 

The origin and history of the system of conveyancing in America is not 
definitely settled. The systems of the various English colonies were not 
uniform. The earliest English colony established was that of Virginia. 
The first known legislation on the point iti this colony was a vote in L626 
requiring all sales to be brought to Jamestown and enrolled within a year 
of their date. In 1 640 an act was passed providing that a deed or mort- 
gage of land without delivery of possession should be adjudged fraudulent 
unless entered in some court. The next colony established was Plymouth. 
The earliest transfer recorded in that colony was a deed in H>27, which, 
instead of being copied in the record book, was written in the book itself 



268 Origin and Development of Conveyancing [July 

and signed by the parties. In 1636 a commission was appointed to alter 
and revise the laws. The revision was adopted, and provided that all con- 
veyances of land should be acknowledged before the governor and recorded 
upon the payment of the fees. This was the origin of the requirement in 
America that deeds should be acknowledged before recording. 

In the Virginia and Plymouth colonies no force or value was given to 
the prior recorded deed, which is one of the chief features of the Massa-, 
chusetts system. 

The Massachusetts system of recording transfers of land was formally 
established by an act or ordinance, as it w T as called, of the General Court, 
October 7, 1640, which provided: "For avoyding all fraudulent convey-; 
ances, & that every man may know what estate or interest other men may 
have in any houses, lands, or other hereditaments they are to deale in, 
it is therefore ordered, that after the end of this month no mor£a<je, bar- 

' OS? 

gaine, sale, or graunt hereafter to bee made of any houses, lands, rents, or 
other hereditaments shalbee of force against any other person except the 
graunter & his heires, unlesse the same bee recorded, as is hereinafter ex- 
posed." Provision was made for acknowledging the deeds, and they 
were to be recorded within the districts into which the Colony had already 
been divided for holding courts. The ordinance further provided that ' 4 it 
is not intended that the whole bargaine, sale, &c, shalbee entered, but 
onely the names of the graunter & grauntee, the thing & the estate 
graunted, & the date ; and all such entryes shalbee certified to the recorder 
at Boston." Magistrates were also appointed to take acknowledgments. 

Of course there had been sundry transfers of land in the Massachusetts 
Colony before the date oi this ordinance, and certain rules and restrictions 
had been made by the various towns concerning transfers. Cambridge, for 
instance, became a very exclusive section in 1632, and the town ordered 
that any one desiring to sell his land should oifer it first to the town, and 
that no stranger should be permitted to buy land without the consent of 
the town. Cambridge, however, was not peculiar in this respect, for Dor- 
chester in 1634, and Boston in 1635, passed similar orders. 

On April 1, 1634, the General Court ordered that the constable and 
four or more of the chief inhabitants of every town, to be chosen by the 
freemen with the advice of some one or more of the next assistants, should 
make a survey of houses and lands and enter the same in a book with the 
several bounds and quantities by the nearest estimation ; " & shall deliuer 
a transcript thereof into the Court, within sixe monethes nowe nexte ensue- 
ing, & the same soe entered and recorded shalbe a sufficient assurance to 
eu'y such Free inhabitant, his & theire heires and assignes, of such estate 
of inheritance, or as they shall haue in any such howses, lauds, or Franke- 
tenemV This order of the General Court was undoubtedly the author- 
ity for the " Book of Possessions " in Boston and the various towns, upon 
which practically all the titles to land within the limits of the old towns 
have since rested. 

Some of the towns were apparently governed by law-abiding men, and 
prepared their books of possession as required by the General Court, but 
others were negligent, and on December 3, 1639, the towns of Concord, 
Lynn, Weymouth, and Dorchester were fined live shillings each for failure 
to comply with the law. Possibly the people of these towns did not take 
the law seriously in view of the fact that it was passed April 1st. 

The work of preparing the Book of Possessions did not progress to the 
satisfaction of the General Court, which, in 1640, passed the ordinance to 



1911] Origin and Development of Conveyancing 269 

which I have already referred. This ordinance has passed through twelve 
revisions and has been slightly amended, but it has remained unchanged in 
substance with the exception that the provision making it unnecessary to 
record deeds in full has been omitted in the subsequent revisions. " Second 
thoughts," they say, "are best," but it has been said that "it is not true 
that second thoughts are best, but first, and third, which are a riper first." 

I had the honor of serving as a member of the committee on the part of 
the Senate to revise the laws in 1902, and if at that time I had had as 
much knowledge, experience, and responsibility in connection with the 
transcribing and storing of records as I have now, I think I mi<dit have 
been tempted to make available the riper first thought of the legislators of 
1640, by restoring the provision that instruments need not be recorded in 
their entirety, but only as to the essential parts, and thereby obviate the 
perpetuation of much of the unnecessary verbiage that is encumbering the 
records from day to day. 

The requirement that a deed must be acknowledged to entitle it to record 
was probably taken from the laws of the Plymouth Colony as they existed 
in 1636, and the Plymouth colonists in turn probably copied the customs 
of London and the English boroughs, which required an acknowledgment 
before the lord mayor or the recorder and one alderman. With the excep- 
tion of this provision for acknowledgment, the system of recording deeds 
adopted by the Massachusetts General Court in 1G40 seems to have been 
original, and forms the basis of the present system of recording deeds 
throughout this country. 

The aforesaid act of 1640 authorized three recording districts, one at 
Salem, one at Ipswich, and one at Boston. The first recorder of Deeds 
for Suffolk County was Stephen Winthrop, whose commission was u to 
record things." 

Here are some of the "things " recorded : On the first page of Volume 1, 
two letters in cipher, or shorthand, which purport to be copies of answers 
to certain inquiries regarding one Hansard Knolles, then minister at Pis- 
cataqua, now Dover, New Hampshire, and a copy of a letter written by 
said Knolles to retract certain accusations that he had marie against the 
Massachusetts authorities, among which were that the government "was 
wor.se than the high commission . . . and that here was nothing but op- 
pression . . . and not so much as a face of religion." 

On page o4 

An agreement made in the behalfe of in r Winthrope, m r Dudley m r Nowell, & 
m r Allen about theire farmes lyeing vppon Concord River in manner as follow eth 
between*; Synion Willard in ti.e belialfe of those gentlemen aforesaid, & 
Nattahatawants Saeliirn of the same ground. The said Simon cloth purchase of 
the said Xattahattawants all the ground w ch the Court granted to the forenamed 
gentlemen lyeing vppon both sides of Concord River, that is m r Winthrope o r 
present Govenour one thousand two hundred & sixty Acres, m r Dudley one 
thousand fyve hundred Acres on the South East side of the River, m r Nov 
fyve hundred Acres, and m r Allen fyve hundred Acres on the North East side of 
the River, & in Consideration hereof , the said Symon giueth to the said Natta- 
hattawants Bixe fadom of waompampege & one wastcoate, & one bree and 

the said Xattahattawants doth covenant & hind hiinselfe. that bee nor a 
other Indians shall set traps w tt in this ground so as any Cattle might receiue 
hurt thereby, and what Cattle shall receiue any hurt by this meanes he shalbe 
lyable to make it good. 

Then follow the peculiar mart resenting the Indian signatures. 
On another pa 2) appears the followin 
Left Joshua Fisher of dedham by a note vnde r his hand Cer[ti]fled me this 9 th 



270 Origin and Development of Conveyancing [July 

of January 1654 that on the 3 d of december las[t] he had tooke vp two stray oxen 
a Red one w th a white face & a bel[l] about his necke & a black one w th y e top 
of his home broken of they were p r ized at twelve pounds by John morse & 
nathaniell Fisher the oxen being in his Custody : this I Affirnie Edw Rawson 
Record [er]. 

There was considerable barter and exchange in the early days as indi- 
cated by the following entry : 

Samuel Bullein of Dedham for & in consideration of two cowes sould him 
granted vuto Thomas Dudley Esq deput Governo' his dwelling house in Dedham 
& foure Acres of land w th in the fence neere adjoyneing to the said house vppon 
condition that the sd Bullein shall pay vnto the sd Thomas Dudley twelve 
pounds starling at the house of the sd Thomas Dudley in Roxbury in manner 
following to wit thirty shillings in good cleane dry wheate the 18 (1) next 
comeing & 20 s in good butter & 10 s in good cheese the 8(7) 1647. & so the like 
sume vppon every eightenth day of march & the like sume of butter & cheese 
vppon every eight day of 7 ber for the three yeares next following provideing 
at his owne cost a Tubb for the butter & the wheate butt r & cheese to be valued 
by indifferent men : & if the Cows be not w th Calfe then ten shillings to be 
abated in the first paym e . This was by mortgage dat 7 (7) 1616. acknowledged 
before John Winthrop Gov: the same day. 

A reminder of the slave traffic is found on page 290 of Volume 1, as 
follows : 

Kuowe all men by theis pn'ts that I Beniamine Gillam of Boston in Newe 
England Ship Carpenter for & in Consideracon of the some of Twenty & Five 
pounds sterl by me in hand Reed of Thomas Sauidge, do sell & sett ouer vnto 
the aforesaid Thomas Sauidge my Neager made whose name is (Hope) w th all 
my right & interest in Mr vnto him & his heires executo rs & assignes warrent- 
ing her the aboue said Hope to be free & Cleare from all Claime or title of any 
other pson for the terme of hir life witnes my hand this 26 th of 12 mo 1652 
Beniamine Gillam. 

These are only a few of the hundreds of interesting and peculiar 
" things " recorded in the early Suffolk records. A member of the Bar 
has recently called my attention to an instrument recorded with the early 
Middlesex deeds, containing this language in the description : " southerly 
to a stake and stones where Daniel Harrington licked William Smith." 

On May 3, 1 643, the Massachusetts Colony was divided into four coun- 
ties, namely Essex, Suffolk, .Middlesex, and Norfolk. Suffolk County in- 
cluded Boston, " Koxbeny," Dorchester, Dedham, Braintree, Weymouth, 
Hingham, and " Nantaskot." Plymouth Colony was consolidated with 
Massachusetts in 1692. 

In the early days the records did not accumulate very rapidly, and nine- 
teen volumes were sufficient to record the instruments left for record 
prior to January 1, 1700, in the Suffolk Registry of Deeds. On Janu- 
ary 1, 1800, the number had reached only 193. On January 1, 1850, 
the total was 606, but during the last half of the nineteenth century 
there was a wonderful increase in the number of transfers of real estate, 
and on January 1, 1900, there were 2(n)(j volumes on the shelves. Dur- 
ing the past few years there has been a steady growth, and to-day the 
copyists are finishing volume 3506 of Suffolk Deeds, so that the growth 
for the last eleven years is 2-14 volumes in excess of that from 1640 to 
1850. This tremendous increase in the volume of land records illustrates 
what a serious problem will confront posterity in the mere matter of the 
storage of the records in the course of a few generations. 

The modern Massachusetts method of conveyancing constitutes one of 
the most technical, responsible, and at the same time most tedious branches 
of the law. It is also one of the least remunerative lines of practice. Con- 



1911] Origin and Development of Conveyancing 271 

veyancing requires peculiar skill and very close application to detail. The 
very title and the entire value of the land in question is involved in the 
work, and vet the amount of work and detail that would warrant a fee of 
perli.i})- ^oOO in the trial of a comparatively small action of tort, rarely 
brings more than $50 when applied to the examination of a title. 

When a person buys a piece of real estate he usually feels that he has 
paid all it is worth and perhaps a little more, and he is therefore anxious 
to spend as little as possible for the examination of a title, which he con- 
siders in the nature of a somewhat unnecessary extra frill, when in point 
of fact it is the most important part of the whole transaction, and should 
be paid for accordingly. The grantor sometimes tells the grantee that it 
is unnecessary to examine the title because the property has been in his 
own family lor a great many years, or that he has recently purchased the 
propertv and that he had the title examined then by his lawyer, and he 
knows it is all right ; but no person should purchase real estate unless the 
title is thoroughly examined bjha competent conveyancer, or unlass he sat- 
isfies himself conclusively thai it has been recently examined by such a 
convevancer, and then has it run down to date. 

Very few lawyers are good conveyancers. They have not had the neces- 
sary experience, perhaps, because they have devoted their time to other 
lines where- the returns are greater, but if one employs a good lawyer, of 
course he can be depended upon to obtain the services of a competent con- 
veyancer to assist him in the work if he does not feel qualified or has not 
the time to attend to it himself ; and one's lawyer can then attend to the 
final detail- of passing the papers and dividing the fee. 

1 have known a case where the purchaser of a lot of land gave the ex- 
amination of the title to a legal friend who agreed to do it for a small 
sum, and a few years after he had built his house it was found that he had 
built it on the wrong lot, and was put to considerable expense to remove 
it to the proper location. 

I have had personal experience w r ith a lot where I was counsel for the 
purchaser, and the grantor was an old member of the bar, whose son was 
considered a good conveyancer and had examined the title a few years 
befoi Upon examination I found that tin? land bad been sold for non- 
payment of taxes, and that an attachment mini'' against a prior owner had 

,er been dissolved. 

J have often wished that I could speak to some intending purchaser who 
was investing his entire savings in a house and lot, to advise him to <*et a 
conveyancer to a ome inexperienced member of the bar whom he had 

employed to examine the title, because I felt certain that he was not likely 
to do justice to the examination. 

Ridiculous mi-takes art; caused by carelessness on the part of inexpe- 
rienced conveyancers who Beem to dislike the work and are anxious to 
rush it through as soon a possible. Recently a member of the bar drew 
a deed and took the acknowledgment as justice of the peace, and of com 

ned his own mime, but in the mortgage which accompanied the (\i-a\ he 

ned the acknowledgment with his own first name and the Burname of 
the grantor. 

Jt i- not an infrequent occurrence for the grantee, if a justice of the 
. to take the acknowledgment of the grantor, which of course U I 

pr and would meet with objection from future title examine]-.. I 

believe there have been i where the grantor assumed to lake his o 
acknowledgment. 

VOL. LXV. 19 



272 Origin and Development of Conveyancing [July 

If these irregularities are noticed when the paper is presented for record 
they are called to the attention of the grantee and corrected on the spot, 
but in the rush of business if the instrument is apparently in proper form, 
and is sealed and acknowledged, it is received, and irregularities may not be 
discovered until the document is spread upon the records. Many of the 
irregularites are not fatal to the title, but they all cause annoyance and 
sometimes considerable expense to the purchaser in order to clear the 
title when he attempts to sell his property. 

On a recent trip I met a clergyman who asked me to look up a deed to 
his property, which had been left for record a year ago. I took the instru- 
ment from the files to mail it, and found that the property had been con- 
veyed to him through a third party who conveyed simply one undivided 
third part, so that the grantee, according to the record, owned only one- 
third of the house and lot instead of the whole. If the grantee succeeds 
in finding the third party he may yet obtain that which properly belongs to 
him. 

The necessity for a proper examination oi e a title before the purchase of 
property was admirably illustrated by the late Uriel H. Crocker in a very 
interesting article written for the American Law Review in October 1875, 
and since published in pamphlet form, entitled " The History of a Title ; 
A Conveyancer's Romance." After reading this article one will readily 
realize how full of pitfalls is the ground which a conveyancer is accus- 
tomed to travel, and how extensive should be his knowledge and how great 
the care to be exercised in the examination of a title. 

Of course the old custom of livery of seisin has long fallen into disuse, 
and to-day in Massachusetts the delivery of a deed in writing under seal, 
and properly acknowledged, is sufficient without any other act or ceremony 
to convey real estate. The deed must be delivered to the grantee in the 
lifetime of the grantor or it is of no effect. For instance, where a grantor, 
had drawn a deed and kept it in an old chest, and the chest with all its 
contents was given to the grantee by will, it was held to be no delivery and 
the deed was void. 

Leases for more than seven years must be recorded in order to be effec- 
tive against third parties. There are on record in the Registry of Deeds 
for Suffolk County many interesting leases in the neighborhood of the 
Cornhill district, some of them being for 1000 years, and for most peculiar 
rents. For instance, the building at the corner of Court Street and Corn- 
hill is leased under a thousand year lease for the rental of ten tons of Rus- 
sia old sables iron, delivered quarterly on the premises. During the early 
life of the lease the rental was paid as called for by the terms of the lease, 
but after a while when Russia old sables iron was not commonly used in 
this country, the custom grew up to pay the rental in gold. The heirs of 
the original lessors some years ago desired to break the lease and demanded 
payment in iron as called for by the terms of the lease, knowing that the 
tenants could not pay it ; and upon failure to pay, declared the lease termi- 
nated. It was held by the Supreme Court, however, that the lessors were 
entitled to the iron if they wanted it, but by reason of change in customs 
the tenants must be given a reasonable time in which to procure the iron. 

In examining the records in the Suffolk Registry it is important to re- 
member that prior to the year 1752 the Julian calendar was in force, and 
March was the first month of the year, the year beginning on the 25th day 
of March ; so that in the old records where the first month is referred to, 
it means the month of March and not the month of January. 



1911] Origin and Development of Conveyancing 273 

Two volumes of the Suffolk records, numbers 112 and 114, have been 
missing from the registry since the days of the Revolution. The tradition 
i6 that when the British occupied Boston, Dedham was made the shire town 
oi Suffolk County, and in moving the records to and from Dedham the 
books were lost and have never been found. There is another tradition 
that these books were taken to Halifax by the Loyalists. 

"When I assumed the office of Register of Deeds nearly all of the Reg- 
iser's time was consumed in writing his name upon records and upon the 
recorded instruments to be returned to the grantees. It seemed to me un- 
wise to spend so much time writing my long name to attest records that I 
knew nothing of personally, because of course I could not find the time to 
examine them. I was therefore glad to co-operate with the Register of 
Probate and the Recorder of the Land Court in obtaining the passage of 
an act which authorized the Register to attest the deeds by the volume 
after they are bound, and which authorizes the Register or Assistant Reg- 
ister to affix a fac-simile stamp of the Register's signature on the original 
instrument. The passage of this act afforded the Register much more 
time to meet the conveyancers, members of the bar, and public in general, 
to hear complaints, listen to suggestions, and supervise the general conduct 
of the office. 

1 believed that there was much danger of fraudulent dissolutions of at- 
tachments under the old law and the old system in use throughout the 
Commonwealth, and I petitioned the Legislature for the passage of an act 
requiring that every dissolution of an attachment on the margin of the 
docket should be witnessed by the Register or one of his assistants thereto 
duly authorized. The bill was passed, and the act became operative May 
°'« "1907. 

On July 1st, 1907, I substituted the use of the typewriter for pen and 
ink in writing the records, and 1 think the change has given general satis- 
faction. 

The early recorders received everything for which a fee was paid, but 
on of the most important duties of the present Register is to prevent the 
re< ording of matters that are not entitled to record. For instance, a party 
who has a tract of land in one of the suburbs makes a contract with the 
promoter or broker who is to sell the land at auction and get a certain 
coin minion for selling it, but he is somewhat uncertain as to whether the 
lau<( owner will carry out his agreement. He therefore tries to record 
tht j H rsonal contract, which would have the effect of using the Register's 
offi t- for a collection agency, because no one who examined the title would 
r * c uumend it to a purchaser if there was any such cloud upon it. Such 
paj i rs are rejected by the Register after a wordy warfare. 

Again, another man brings in a receipt dated forty years ago, reciting 
tha; John Smith has received a deed of land from Thomas Jones, which he 
is to n convey if the said Jones pays the said Smith for legal services. 
Th instrument is unsealed and not acknowledged. It is simply a receipt 
f° r <1. It is not entitled to record, but the attorney who brings it 

in i ii.ikt-.-5 a btrenuous contest to have it placed on record, and admits that 
Ike ason he doe.-, it is that it will cost less to record such a paper than 
to jjmrsue his reme ly in court. 

II kinds of personal requests and favors are asked of the Register to 
1 Mint a lame case, but in the interest of real property rights the Register 
mu i have the courage to say "no" to any unreasonable or improper re- 
quest of this kind. 



in 



274 Origin and Development of Conveyancing [Jul 

There were one or two imperfections in the law that were forcibly calle 
to my attention during my first year in office. For instance, it was poss 
bie under the law for a mortgagor to go to a record book and write a di 
charge on the margin of his mortgage, forging the mortgagee's name, 
not discovered, this would deceive a title examiner and lead him to belies 
that the mortirao-e had been discharged. There was nothing in the la 1 
requiring a marginal discharge of a mortgage to be witnessed. I intr 
duced a bill, which was enacted, to have a proper safeguard thrown aboi 
such discharges similar to the law regarding the dissolutions of attacl 
ments. 

The typewriting system of recording will reduce the space occupied \ 
the records about one-third, but some system will have to be adopted eve] 
tually that will not require as much space as is now necessary for recor< 
ing or registering titles. It is possible that standard forms of deeds ail a 
mortgages may be devised, and that in recording an instrument referencj 
may simply be made to the grantor and grantee, date, consideration, ai) 1f 
any peculiar conditions of the instrument, and then have it noted that ifl 
was a certain standard mortgage or deed of the form prescribed by statute. 
Such forms are now in use in some of the western states. 

Under the laws of Maryland every Register of Deeds is required to 
make an abstract of all the essential details of instruments that are recorded, 
and they are sent to the capitol at Annapolis and kept there to preserve 
the record of titles in case any registry of deeds should be destroyed by 
fire or otherwise. • This is a wise provision, which I think should he 
adopted in all the states. 

The Massachusetts act authorizing the registration of titles to land wept 
into effect on October 1, 1898, and the Land Court was opened for bus* 
ness on the fourteenth of the same month. This law was established for 
the purpose of simplifying the transfer of land and making it unnecessary 
to have an extensive search of the title when it was desired to make a 
transfer. 

Under this system a person desiring to have his land registered first files 
a petition in the Land Court, which is immediately referred to an examiner 
to report on the state of the title. After the examiner's report is received, 
notice is sent to the petitioner, and if the title is passed by the examiner, a 
notice to all interested parties is issued. The petitioner is required to file 
a notice of his petition in the registry of deeds for the district in which the 
land lies. The register of deeds in each county is the assistant recorder 
of the Land Court for his district 

If the court is satisfied that the petitioner is legally entitled to the lard, 
a decree for the confirmation and registration of the title is entered in tie 
name of the petitioner, and a copy of the decree is sent to the assistant 
recorder for the district within which the land included in the decree is 
situated, together with a copy of a plan of the land as finally established 
by the court. • 

The assistant recorder transcribes the decree in a book called the regis- 
tration book, and this entry is the " original certificate," which is accom- 
panied by the plan. An exact copy of the original certificate is then made 
by the assistant recorder, and is labelled ''owner's duplicate certificate 
On the back of the certitieate is entered a memorandum of any encum- 
brances stated in the decree. 

When it is desired to transfer registered land, the grantor makes a de-ed 
in common form setting forth the fact that the land is registered and i 



e- 



1911] Bells of Harvard College 275 

ferring to the certificate number, and surrenders his owner's duplicate cer- 
tificate to the purchaser, who brings both instruments to the office of the 
issistant recorder for the district. The instrument of conveyance is prop- 
erly stamped and filed, the old certificate of registration is cancelled, and a 
new original certificate is prepared and filed ; then a new owner's duplicate 
is given to the new owner, any outsanding encumbrances being noted on 
the back of each new certificate. 

During the year 1910 there were 48,518 transactions at the Suffolk 
Registry of Deeds, and 3906 transactions through the Suffolk Registry 
District of the Land Court. 



BELLS OF HARVARD COLLEGE* 

By Arthur H. Nichols, M.D., of Boston 
Member of the Ancient Society of College Youths, London 

In the college buildings, to each of which the term " College " was in- 
variably applied from 1642 to 1720, there have been installed at various 
times no less than eight bells, as verified by information, authentic if often 
very meagre, that has come down to us. The recent discovery, incident 
to the excavation for the Cambridge Subway, of ancient foundation walls 
has been thought to strengthen the theory that the original College stood 
near the site of Gray's Hall, though Goffe's College, of which little is 
known, must have been situated in that vicinity. 

While no picture of the first College exists, detailed descriptions of the 
floor-plans make it possible to reproduce an approximate design of the ex- 
terior, the front of which we know was broken by a turret surrounded by 
a "lanthorn." This turret shows the intent to provide a bell, an instru- 
ment at that date of prime necessity in every community, clocks and watches 
not having come into general use. The following extractf from the " Rules 
and Precepts that are observed in the Colledge," contained in a book en- 
titled "New England's First Fruits," published in London in 1643, in- 
dicate that a bell was already in use : 

FIRST BELL 

7. Every schollar shall be present in his Tutor's Chambers at the 7th houre 
in the morning immediately after the sound of the bell at his opening the Scrip- 
ture^ and prayer. BO also at the 5th houre at night, and their give an account of 
bis own prival ding, as aforesaid, in particular the third, and constantly 

attend lectures at the houres appointed. But if any without necessary impedi- 
ment shall absent himself from prayer or lectures, he shall be lyable to admoni- 
tion, if he offend above once a week. 

A '<] reference to this bell is found in "Certain Orders by the 

Scholars and Officers of tin- Colledge to bee observed, written, 28 March, 
1650:" t 

The Butler upon even 7 Sixt Day of the week at noon Is to give an account to 
every Schollar demanding his weeks slzings In the Buttery & Is doI hound to 

stay above half an hour at Bevers in Buttery after the Tolling of the bell, Nor 

♦Expanded from a paper read before The Colonial Society of Massachusetts. April 
28,1916. ' 

t Peirce'a Hi-:, of Barr. Coll., Appendix, p. 4. 
£ College Book I, p. 50. 



276 Bells of Harvard College [July- 

above a quarter of an hour after Thanksgiving in the Hall at Meals, The Cook 
on the Sixt ])a} r at Noon shall give in the weeks expenses of the whole society. 
w ch the Butler shall enter into his Book, according to Custome & shal keep the 
Bills from Quarter to Quarter and shew them to the Stewart at his demand for 
his satisfaction. 

A shade of doubt may, indeed, be cast upon the identity of this bell by 
the suggestion that the College may have had the use of the bell of the 
First Parish, with which close relations had been established from its founda- 
tion. In fact one of the reasons for selecting Cambridge as the site of the 
College was the proximity of this church, then under the ministry of 
Thomas Shepard,* a clergyman of marked ability and piety, and the first 
Commencement was held in this meeting house. 

To remove all uncertainty on this point it becomes necessary to show 
that the College possessed the only bell in Cambridge at the time when 
these " Rules and Precepts " were framed. Now it is known that the first 
mention of any bell in use in Massachusetts occurs in the History of Cam- 
bridge by Prince, who says that in 1632 " the first house for public worship 
at Newtown [Cambridge] with a bell upon it " was built ; and Holmes states 
that the town records confirm this statement, and that the town meetings 
were called by the ringing of the bell. Gossf adds that for some reasons 
not known a drum was afterwards substituted, as mentioned by Edward 
Johnson in " Wonder Working Providence " when on approaching the 
town a drum was heard calling the people to meeting. Furthermore, in 
1646, the records contain an order for the payment of fifty shillings to a 
man for his services to the town in beating the drum. 

The explanation of this temporary substitution of a drum is found in the 
history of the Society organized under Thomas Hooker. Of two hundred 
Puritans who came over in one company, many had settled in Newtown 
and built the first meeting house, which stood on the west side of Water, 
now Dunster Street, a little south of Spring, now Mt. Auburn Street. In 
the summer of 1636 Mr. Hooker with his entire congregation, one hundred 
in number, emigrated to the place in Connecticut called Hartford ; and it 
is recorded that they carried with them their bell. Here it is said to have 
been in use upon the First Church till it was broken in 1825. It was re- 
placed by another, cast in 1827.$ 

The meeting house in Cambridge thus left vacant was at once bought by 
the Society, which had been organized February 1, 1636, under Mr. Shepard, 
known thereafter as the First Church in Cambridge ; but for at least ten 
years thereafter the church seems to have been without a bell. That on 
the College therefore was the only one in use during this interval. 

A vote of the Parish in 1648 indicates that the first bell had then been 
replaced by another, for it was ordered : 

That there shall be an eight peny ordnary provided by the Townsmen [Select- 
men] every second munday of the month upon there meeteing day ; and that 
whoesoever of the Townsmen fail to be present within half an houre of the 
ringing of the bell, (which shall be halfe an houre after eleven of the clock) he 
shall both lose his dinner and, pay a pint of sacke, or the value thereof, to the 
present Townsmen. 

Tracing further the history of this second church bell, it was removed 
to the second meeting house, erected in 1650, upon Watch House Hill, 

♦Johnson, Wonder Working Providenco, Poole's Reprint, p. 161. 

t Register, vol. 28, p. 27'.). 

J Hist, of First Church in Hartford, Walker, pp. 222-3. 



1911] Bells of Harvard College 211 

within the present College Yard and near the site of Dane Hall. Replaced 
by a larger bell given in 1700 by Capt. Andrew Belcher, it was then voted 
by the Town to give " the little meeting house bell " to the Cambridge 
Farms, now Lexington. 

SECOND BELL 

In College Book Til is the following entry in the handwriting of the 
Treasurer, Danforth. It is uncertain whether the date of this entry is 
1658, 1659, or possibly a year or two later, but the reference is unques- 
tionably to a second bell. 

Mr. John Willet gave to the Colledge the Bell now hanging in the Turrett. 

Subsequent allusions to this bell are found in the College Records, for 
example : 

At a meeting of the Overseers, in 1660, it was ordered: 

4. Whereas (through long experience) former Laws have not been effectuall 
for the p r venting of unnecessary dammages to the Colledge, by the violence or 
carelessness of those for whose Accommodation great cost & charges have from 
time to time been expended. The Overseers do therefore order, that henceforth 
all due care be taken for the p r venting thereof ; And that where any dammage 
shall be found done to any Study or Chamber inhabited, The p r son or p r sons 
resident therein shall make good the same, and where any dammage is done to 
y e Edifice of the Colledge (excepting by the inevitable providence of God) to 
any vacant Chamber, or Study, the Colledge fences about the yard, pump, Bell 
or clock &c. : the same shall be made good again by all the Students resident in 
the Colledge at the time when such dammages shall be done or discovered to be 
done & shall be duly payd in their Quarter Bills to the Steward of the Col- 
ledge, who shall repay the same to the Treasurer or oth r such officers of the 
Colledge as shall be appoynted to disburse the same. (Coll. Bk. Ill, p. 24.) 

At a meeting of the Overseers at the President's house, March, 1667: 

The Orders following were confirmed untill the Overseers shall see cause to 
take them into further consideration. (Coll. Lawes. Eadem. Lib. I, p. 37.) 

4. The Steward is from time to time to pay the Colledge officers, viz. The 
Tuto r s, Cook, Butler & Bellringer, their respective dues, sallarycs, also to allow 
the monito r s Account. (Coll. Bk. Ill, p. 34.) 

18. The Buttlar upon ev r y (3th day at noon shall give an Account to ev r y 
Schollar demanding his week- sizings in the Buttery; & he is not bound to stay 
above halfe an hour at breakfast in the buttery, after the Tolling of y c bell ; nor 
above a quarter of an hour after thanksgiving in the Hall, at meales. 

(Coll. Bk. Ill, p. 30.) 

23. The Bell-Ringers office is to ring the Bell (except for meales) to keep 
the clock & call the president to prayrs. for which he shall receive from the 
Steward five pound per annum. (Coll. Bk. IH, p. 30.) 

An abbreviate of the College Accounts conteyning both receits and disburse- 
ments from October, 1664, until Decemb. L663. Extracted oat of the Colledge 
Books, made and given in by Thomas Danforth, Trear. 

Harvard College is Debto r : 

Imp's. To m n Dnnster in foil of her demands ------- 0200000 

To Table Linnen and UtensiUs for y« Battery 006 

Toezpeno l r Turners - - - - 007 08 06 

To Ballaryes and Allowances pavd to the Fellows & other Colledge 

Officers for 9 years past ----- 445 18 06 

To repair- of the Edifices Presidents Lodge and fences &c. for 9 

years past ___.._... 837 n 01 

To loss in ; red at 8 a penny 056 06 11 

To freight of a chest of Books 001 00 00 

To M' Carter - - 005 

To a stags head send to England to a Benefacto* 000 10 00 



278 Bells of Harvard College [July 

To moneys payd for exchange of a Bell --------- 006 02 06 

To a parcell of laud on w ch the Coll. now stands 020 10 00 

(Coll. Bk. Ill, p. 46.) 

The amount allowed as above in exchange of a bell, doubtless the ori- 
ginal bell, indicates that its weight was about 150 pounds. Of the early 
bells of the colonists none are known to have exceeded three hundred 
pounds in weight. 

The steward shall deliver in, to y e Butler, his Bread at 5 s y e bushell, allowing 
to every Bushell 70 Loaves, ye weight of every Loafe being proportionable to 
y e Current price of wheate, as in y e Country statute, for white bread ; & shall 
deliver in his Beer at 2 lb the Barrell, each Barrell consisting of 16 Beer Gallons : 
allowing thereunto a Peck of Mault. — The steward is from time to tyme, to pay 
ye Colledge officers, viz ye Tuto 1 ^, Cook, Butler, & Belleringer, y r respective 
Dues and Sallaries ; & allso, to allow ye Monito r s Account. — The steward shall 
be accountable, & pay unto y e Treasurer Quarterly, w* shall be given in, in ye 
q r t r Bill, in y e Ace" of Study-Rents & glass-mending. He shall be allowed in his 
Acc tts , 5 Ib qurt r ly, for his salary. 

June 1, 1675. Ordered, That Will : Bordman, Colledge Smith, be payd by the 
Treasurer 20 shill : for mending the Clock : & that he be allowed 12 shill : per 
annu for that Service for the future. (Coll. Bk. Ill, p. 68.) 

At a meeting of the Corporation, August 22, 1676 : 

2. That the Butler ring y e bell at five of y e clock in y e morning, winter & 
summer, and at nine of y e clock at night throughout y e yeare, beside his ringing 
at y e other stated times for prayers & Meales. (Coll. Bk. I, p. 81.) 

7. If any Scholar shall be Absent from publick worship in the meeting house 
on either part of the Lord's day, without giving sufficient reason, he shall be 
fined three Shillings. And if bodyly Infirmity or any other Necessary occasion 
prevents his Attendance on said Worship, he shall Notifie his Tutor, and iu his 
Absence y e President, or some other Tutor, at the ringing of the first Bell, 
otherwise his Absence shall be esteemed Groundless. 

(Coll. Bk. I, pp 184-5, chap. 2.) 

8. Inasmuch as complaints have been made of disorders in y e meeting house, 
by Scholars going theither before the ringing of the Second Bell ; it is therefore 
ordered, y* no undergraduates Sha[ll] go to y e meeting House on the Lords day, 
before y e ringing of the Second Bell. And whoever shall transgress this Law, 
Shall be punished by the President or one of the Tutors, not exceeding Tw[o] 
Shillings. (Coll. Bk. I, pp. 184-5, chap. 2.) 

3. The waiters when the Bell tolls at meal tim[e] shall receive the Plates 
and Victualls at the Kitchen Hatch, & carry the same to the severall tables for 
which they are designed. And none shall receive their commons, ou[t] of the 
Hall, Except in case of Sickness, or som[e] weighty Occasion. And the Senior 
Tutor, or Other Senior Scholar in the Hall Shall crave a blessing & return 
thanks. And al[l] the Scholars while at their meals, Shall sit in their Places, 
& behave themselves, decent[ly] & orderly ; and whosoever shall be rude or 
Clamourous at such time, or shall go out o[f ] the Hall before thanks be returned, 
Shall be punished by one of the Tutors, not exceeding five shillings. 

(Coll. Bk. I, p. 195, chap. 5.) 

9. The Butler shall wait upon the President at the Hours for prayer in the 
Hall, for his Orders to ring the Bell ; and also upon the Professors for their 
Lectures, as usual ; he shall likewise ring the bell for commons according to 
custom, and at five a clock in y e morning, & at nine at night. And the said 
Buttler for these and Other Services (to which no particular reward is assign'd) 
shall be Allow'd Sixteen pounds per annum, to be paid by the Undergraduates, 
and charged in their quarter bills. (Coll. Bk. I, p. 200, chap 7.) 

Feb. 2. 1679 Ordered, that the Treasurer pay Aaron Bordman 20 shill p annum 
for keeping y e clock in repayr. (Coll. Bk. Ill, p. 72.) 

1686. Rules & Orders respecting the Steward Cook & Butler of Harvard Col- 
lege. 

'). The Butler shall call y e Rector to Prayers Morning and Evening at the 
Set Times, and tole and ring y c Bell at five of the clock in y° Morning and at 
nine iu the Evening. (Coll. Bk. Ill, p. 88.) 




MASSACHUSETTS HALL, from a Sketch circa 1798 



1911] Bells of Harvard College 279 

It is to be observed that while the colonists brought from England an 
attachment for musical bells they were also accurate in the use of technical 
word- relating to them, many of which, such as "gudgeons," "baldrick," 
"rowel,"* "brasses," "fillet," "flight," " clapper-clamps," having since be- 
come virtually obsolete in this country. Hence their discrimination in the 
use of the words " ring " and " toll." For instance, the bell was " rung " to 
give preliminary warning of approaching service, recitation or meals ; that 
is, it was swung so as to describe a complete revolution, backward and for- 
ward, with each impact of the clapper, and the interval between the strokes 
was therefore long. 

But to give notice that service or recitation was about to begin, or that 
meals were about to be served, the bell was " tolled," or swung only over 
a small arc of the circle in such a way as to allow the clapper to fall upon 
but one side of the sound bow. For deaths and funerals, however, it was 
customary to mount the belfry and toll the bell once in fifteen seconds by 
means of a rope hitched to the flight, or lower extremity of the clapper. 
In many country towns this custom is still kept up.f 

The second Harvard College, built between 1672 and 1680, was a sub- 
stantial brick edifice from the middle of which arose a low but capacious 
belfry. Inasmuch as this building was designed to take the place of the 
original College, then ruinous and pulled down in 1680, it is probable that 
Willet's bell was transferred to the new belfry. Here it is believed to have 
done service for nearly a century ; and later was melted or, at least, badly 
damaged in the disastrous fire of 1764, which destroyed the library, philo- 
sophical apparatus, and personal effects of certain students who occupied 
rooms there. President Holyoke, writing to the General Court, declared 
the destruction to have been complete and that nothing was saved.t A 
passage from the Corporation Records of January 13, 1764, entered but 
a few days before this fire, furnishes final reference to this second bell: 

u The Governor came to town about one o'clock, soon after which all went 
into the Chapel [Holden] at the tolling of the bell, the President and Corpora- 
tion leading," 

THIRD BELL 

Massachusetts College, or Hall, was built 171 8-20. § On September 5, 
1722, it was " Voted, that M* Treasurer !)<• desired to enquire what may be 
the cost of a bell and clock proper for the College." On June 2, 1725, it 
was •• Voted, that the Steward be desired to Bee the bell for the clock to 
strike on, and give as account of the charges thereof: and that the care of 
the clock be committed to him for this year to keep it going, and that he 

•The word "rowel," a little wheel, apart from its use in heraldry, is now employed 
only in connection with a spur. 

t The tolling; of the passing hell was a notification of death, while the number of 
stroke-, called "tellers," indicated the sex. Three times three strokes (.3x3) was the 
ial number for a male adult: hence the expression "nine tellers make a man," 
which I n corruptly applied to the sartorial craft. 

(Mrs. sfascarene, (laughter of President Holyoke states in a letter written Janu- 
ary 30, 1764 to her husband John M ene, who was then in London: "The Col- 
lege Bell also is gone." College Fire in 1764," by Henry V. Waters, in 

rd RtrjiMter, iii, p. 297.) 
$ It i- here pertinent to note that coincident with the erection of this dormitory 
there came int., U se the word "Hull," employed indifferently with the word "Col- 
lege" until 17S0. With the demolition of Stou-hton College in that year the term 

i official designation of buildings became obsolel , I >r the use of the 
words "Coll ad " Hall/' in the United Stat< . exhaustive treatment of 

the - . Libert Matthews, Esq., in Dialect Vote* (American Dialed Society) for 

Dec. 1900, ii, 01-111, and Harvard Graduates Magazine for December, 1904, pp. 211-246. 



280 Bells of Harvard College [July 

have £4 for his services in keeping it in order." 

The " Prospect of the Colledges in Cambridge in New England," en- 
graved in 1726 by W. Burgis, represents this clock on the western gable 
of Massachusetts ; and as the dormitory was topped with neither belfry nor 
bellcote, the bell must have been hung behind the dial-panel still affixed to 
the brick wall, the rectangular opening on each side permitting to a limited 
extent the exit of sound waves. 

Dr. Alexander Hamilton, an English traveller, in his itinerarium of 1744 
notes his impressions as to the artistic merits of the three College buildings 
then standing, and incidentally transmits our last knowledge of this bell, 
the fate of which is not known, though it may have been returned to Eng- 
land in partial payment for another, as will appear later. 

u The building upon the left hand as you enter the court [Harvard] is the 
largest, handsomest, and most ancient, being about 100 years old ; but the mid- 
dle, or front, building [Old Stoughton] is indifferent and of no taste. That 
upon the right hand [Massachusetts] has a little clock upon it which has a very 
good bell." 

Dr. Hamilton's estimate as to the superior quality of this instrument can 
be accepted as presumably correct, as it was doubtless of English casting, 
no bells at that date having been made in the Colonies ; and small bells of 
that period of foreign importation were more musical, mellow, and pene- 
trating than the products of modern founders. Thus the sweet-toned tre- 
bles of Christ Church, Boston, have a carrying power equal to the heaviest 
bells of the ring, and under favorable conditions are distinctly audible with- 
in the precincts of the College Yard. A bell, such as was connected with 
the clock upon Massachusetts, was generally of light weight, suspended 
rigid by means of iron straps and bolts from a beam, to be struck by a 
hammer on its outer sound bow. Not being supplied with headstock or 
wheel it could not be swung. 

FOURTH BELL 

Harvard Hall was promptly rebuilt after the fire at the expense of the 
Province, which assumed responsibility for the loss because the Legislature 
had been occupying it for its sessions in consequence of the prevalence of 
small-pox in Boston. In a new set of " articles respecting the diet of the 
College," adopted by the Corporation, September 10, 1765, reference is 
made to a fourth bell, doubtless raised to the newly erected belfry : 

"4, The waiters when the bell rings [originally written 'tolls'] at meal 
times shall take the furniture of the tables and the victuals at the kitchen hatch, 
and carry the same to the several tables for which they are designed, immediate- 
ly upon which the bell shall toll," 

In prints and sketches of Harvard Hall taken in the latter part of the 
eighteenth century a clock dial is shown on the gable over the front en- 
trance. Peirce speaks of this clock as still attached to the building in 1831. 
It seems possible, therefore, that the clock may have been transferred thither 
from Massachusetts. 

FIFTH BELL 

The fate of the fourth bell is briefly indicated by an entry of January 15, 
1793: # "Voted, that the President and the Treasurer be a Committee to 
procure the recasting of the College Bell lately split, according to their best 
discretion. 

• Coll. Bk. VIII, p. 348. 



I 
> 

73 
< 
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73 
O 

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to 

O 

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CD 




1911] Bells of Harvard College 281 

This bell, like its predecessors was ordered from England, and was, 
doubtless, of heavier metal, weighing according to the following invoice 
2 cwt. 3 q. 10 lb., or 318 pounds. Inasmuch as its diameter at the brim 
would measure about 24 inches, the cask charged in the invoice would pro- 
vide a convenient and safe method of packing for the ocean voyage. 

As to the identity of the two bells returned to the founder in part pay- 
ment, one was plainly the bell recently broken upon Harvard Hall, whose 
weight was probably about 2 cwt. This would leave 1 cwt. 2 q. 141b. for 
the weight of a clock bell such as had about that time been removed from 
Massachusetts Hall. In view of the total destruction of Harvard Hall in 
1764, nothing but the bare walls being left standing, it is inconceivable that 
the Willct Bell should have alone escaped destruction and no record be 
made of it. 

Invoice of one Cask shipped by Peter TVainwright & C°. on board the Brig 
Diana Doane, Snow Master, for Boston on Account & Risque of Eben r . Storer 
Esq 1- Merchant there & to him Consigned. Liverpool Sept r . 10th, 1793. 

C. Q. lb. 

1 Bell Weighing 2-3-10 @ 14d. 18.11.0 

Cr. 

By 2 Old Bells \~< )kd lfi 1 5 2 9 7 

Allowing for Staples / ® J ^ 16. 1 6 J. ». 7 

Charges Viz 
To Cash p'd Freight of 2 Bells from \ fi q 

Boston to Liverpool Cartage &c j 

To Insurance on their Aiut. £15.12.6. 

2 Gu 8 p C*. - 6.6 

To Cask 6.6 

To Carriage to & from the Founders 18.0 

To Commission on £20.8. @ 2£ p C*. 10.2 

To Insurance on £20.8.0 @ 2 Gu B p C*. 8.6 2.16.6 

£5.6.1 
Errors Excepted, 

Peter Wainwright & Co. 

SIXTH BELL 

In the autumn of 1807 the fifth bell appears to have been damaged by 
vandalism on the part of the students, for on November 23 it was " Voted, 
that the President and others be a committee to examine the state of 
Harvard Hall, and to consider the most effectual method of securing it 
against erruption, make an estimate of the expense, and report to the 
Corporation." At this same date it was also voted, "that the President 
be requested to cause a new bell to be purchased for the College on as 
sonable terms as he can." On January 11, 1808, this Committee made 
it- report, when it was " Voted, that when a bell is procured for the College, 
the President be requested to cause good security to be provided against 
all improper access, and that a chain be nsed, instead of a rope, to ring the 
bell as Ear as [it] is exposed to common access, or below the floor aext the 
bell." It may be added that this grotesque suggestion of a chain attach- 
ment, while affording n<> protection against trespass, would have made the 
proper management of the bell impracticabli , 

This Bixth bell \\ t in 1^0* by Paul Revere at his foundry, which 

had I d removed in 1804 from the north end of Boston to Canton, this 

ite being still in the possession of his descendants. If weighed 434 

pound vded in his old stock book now in the possession of William 

li. Revere. 



282 Bells of Harvard College [July 

SEVENTH BELL ' 

Becoming cracked in 1836 this bell was replaced by another the same 
year weighing 450 pounds, cast by George Handel Hoi brook of East 
Medway, Mass. The Holbrook bell was faultily suspended, and became 
broken in 1899, after having been rung for forty-two years by the veteran 
janitor, Mr. Jones. It was preserved for a few years as a relic by Mr. 
Jones, but in 1904 it was given by him to the Harvard Memorial Society 
and was broken up, a part of the bronze being used for tablets placed on 
Hollis and Hoi worth v Halls. A model of the old bell was made from the 
same metal and presented to Mr. Jones. 

It is a current tradition in Harvard, Mass., that a condemned bell once 
used in Harvard Hall was sold to be placed later on the Baptist church in 
the parish of Still Biver. This story finds endorsement in the history of 
the town by Henry S. Nourse, while the name of the teamster who is said 
to have hauled the bell from Cambridge is cited by old residents, who are 
even able to describe the pranks by which it was injured. Inasmuch as 
legends of this character usually contain an element of truth, the writer, 
having traced all facts bearing on the matter, ventures to suggest the 
following as the most probable explanation of the error. The bell in 
question, which is indeed cracked, bears the inscription " George Holbrook, 
1807," this being the year when the fifth Harvard bell was wantonly 
damaged ; and, as a further coincidence, it was also the year in which the 
first bell of the town was placed upon the Congregational Church, paid for 
chiefly by private subscription. If it is assumed then that this damaged 
bell was sold for old metal to Holbrook and recast in the same year, it 
would not be unnatural that he should attempt to impart a sentimental 
value by designating it the bell of Harvard Hall. But how, then, are we 
to account for its appearance at Still River, whose church was not erected 
till 1832 ? On this point light is thrown by the inscription on the bell now 
in use on the Congregational Church, to wit : " G. H. Holbrook, Medway, 
1827," ordered, it would appear, to replace the original bell of 1807 which 
had become cracked. And if the damage to the latter had not been con- 
siderable, or enough to impair materially its tone, it would probably have 
been retained on the chance of disposing of it later for further use. And 
this opportunity was certainly presented five years later, when a bell, now 
said to have been slightly cracked at the time of purchase, was given in 1832 
to be hung upon the Baptist Church in Still Biver, completed in that year. 
If this theory is correct, then the fact that this cracked bell is composed in 
part at least of the metal of the Harvard bell may afford some consolation 
for the correction of this fiction. 

To most living alumni of Harvard the clear-toned, aggressive sound of 
Holbrook's bell will have been the most familiar, and it will be of interest 
to know that Major George Holbrook acquired the art of bell casting by 
serving as apprentice to Paul Revere at his original foundry at the northern 
extremity of Boston. He started to cast bells on his own account in 
Brookfield, and was establishing a lucrative business when, by the endorse- 
ment of notes, he became financially ruined. He was thus obliged to re- 
linquish his home and retire impoverished to his native town, Wrentham. 
While living there in retirement he managed to secure the contract for 
casting a bell for the new meeting-house in East Medway. The casting 
was done in an improvised structure and in the presence of a concourse of 
people in East Medway. His success in turning out a bell of excellent 
tone led to the offer of capital and the establishment of a foundry in the 




MASSACHUSETTS HALL, 1911 



1911] Bells of Harvard College 283 

place, conduct* -d by four successive generations until the year 1880. 
During this period these bells acquired a reputation equal to that of the 
best English and Belgian founders, the best known in Boston being those, 
in the Hollis Street and the West Church towers. No attempt was ever 
made at this foundry, nor by Revere, to cast a chime, or peal, a matter of 
much greater difficulty than making single bells. 

EIGHTH BELL 

The present hell in Harvard Hall, cast by Meneely & Co. of West Troy, 
N. Y.j weighs 550 pounds. It was first rung January 7, 1900. 

In 1894 an appeal was made through the Harvard Graduated Magazine 
for a complete ring of heavy bells to be hung in the tower of Memorial 
Hall, designed to facilitate the introduction of scientific change ringing, as 
practiced at Cambridge and Oxford Universities. In reponse to this appeal 
the entire amount necessary to defray the cost of such a peal was promptly 
offered, and from two different sources. The scheme, however, met with 
failure, for an inspection of the imposing tower by engineers disclosed the 
surprising fact that its walls were too unstable to withstand the thrust of 
even light hell- Bwung upon the principle of the pendulum, while all other 
requirements of a ringing guild, including a ringing chamber, had been 
omitted from the architect's designs. 

NINTH BELL 

Memorial Hall now contains a clock and fine-toned bell of 3000 pounds, 
cast by Van Duzen & Co. of Cincinnati, the gift of the class of 1872, 
installed and formally presented after Commencement, 1807. 

It has been suggested that the site of old Stoughton might be appropri- 
ately marked by the erection of a lofty campanile which would serve for a 
clock and peal of bells. Indeed, within a few years a very large sum has 
been i d to the College, more than adequate to provide for the con- 

Btruction of Buch a monument. This offer was, however, declined from the 
feeling that any benefit thus accruing to the College would be hardly com- 
mensurate with the amount expended. 

Shortly afterwards came another offer of a ring of twelve heavy bells as 
a in- tnorial of a graduate of the Class of 1847. This generous offer was 
likewise made in vain, one of the reasons assigned being that no tower 
wa ilable for its installation. 

Incidentally, it may be mentioned that change ringing on tower bells has 
been systematically taught for several years at Groton School. Ib-nce 
there can always he found at Cambridge graduates of this school sufficient 
in numb make up a guild of experienced ringers qualified to manage 

church bells of any weight. 

Tin- d >ove collated establish the fact, not before noted, that, of fif- 

u bells listed below, comprising all known to have been in use in Mas- 

6achn- up to 10*0, inclusive, three were hung within the precincts of the 

present College Yard, viz. the original College hell, that of Willet, and 

the bell of the First Parish Church (Shepard). 

Ko. Locality Y'ur 

1 Newtown (Cambridge; carried to Hartford in the Kiui- 1' 

Moil of 1 <VM)) 

2 mi 16 

3 Boston, First Church - 1641 

4 Original College Bull L643 



284 Genealogical Research in England [July 

5 Ipswich 1647 

6 Watertown 1(M8 

7 Cambridge, First Parish Church (Shepard) 1648 

8 Charlestown, First Church 1657 

9 Maiden 1658 

10 Harvard College, Willet's Bell circa 1659 

11 jUedfield 1661 

12 Dorchester 1662 

13 Portsmouth, N. H. 1664 

14 Hadley 1670 

15 Plymouth 1679 

For valuable assistance in searching the College Records the writer is 

indebted to the Librarian, William C. Lane, and to Albert Matthews, Esq. 



GENEALOGICAL EESEARCH IN ENGLAND 

Transcribed by Miss Elizabeth French, and communicated by the Committee on 

English Research 

[Continued from page 187] 

French 

For many years the descendants of William French of Cambridge, Mass. » 
who came to New England in 1635 in the Defence, have supposed that he 
was the William French who was baptized in Halstead, Essex, 15 March 
1603, son of Thomas French of Stanstead Hall, Essex. We know that 
the emigrant had a brother John of Cambridge, Mass., whose estate he 
administered in 1645-6. Thomas French of Stanstead Hall also had a 
son John. William French is said to have been seventy-seven years of 
age when he died in 1681. The names of some of his children aoree with 
the names of some of Thomas French's children, namely Francis, John, 
Elizabeth, and Mary. All these things made the connection seem most 
probable, especially as the Harlakendens and Rev. Thomas Shepherd, the 
leaders of the party that came in the Defence, came from Earl's Colne, but 
two miles from Halstead. 

Now, however, it appears that this supposed ancestry of William French 
is wrong, as the investigations of H. Hutchins French, Esq., of London, 
have disclosed. Mr. French has made an extended research into the 
French families of Suffolk and Essex, and has kindly showed all his 
papers and has allowed extracts to be made from them. It was he who 
first called attention to the fact that William, the son of Thomas French of 
Stanstead Hall, died in England. The evidence is as follows : 

1. Thomas French of Arkesden, Essex, held the manor of Pitley in 

Bardfield, Essex. Will proved 1551. Wife Elizabeth, whose 
will was proved in 1556. They had daughters Elizabeth, Joane, 
and Agnes, and one son 

2. Thomas French of Wethersfield, Essex, who married first Eliza- 

beth, and secondly Bridget. He inherited the manor of Pitley 
from his father. Will proved 15 C J9. He had daughters Mary and 
Elizabeth, and one son 

3. Thomas French, who married Anne or Agnes, daughter and co- 

heiress with her two sisters- of John Olmstead, gentleman, of 



1911] Genealogical Research in England 287 

Hinckley 

The Will of Robert Henkle of the parish of Lenham in the Diocese 
of Canterbury, 80 December 1522. My body to be buried in the churchyard 
of " our blessed ladie assuption" of Lenham. To the high altar there, 
for lights, etc. The residue of all my goods to Johane my wife, whom I 
make my executrix. I make William A chambre and John henkle, my 
brothers, overseers. Johane my wife to take the profits of my messuage 
that I now dwell in, a garden lying next the tenement of John Hores, and 
of a barn, for life, and after her decease to my daughter Isabell. Imme- 
diately after my death 1 will the messuage that I bought of m r John Brent, 
gentleman, to daughter Isabell. Witnesses: Thomas Partriche, Richard 
Kyple, Mighell Furmyngne, John Furmer, and others. Proved 4 Febru- 
ary 1522-3 by the oaths of Thomas gtriche and John Hynkle, and com- 
mission issued to the executrix named in the will. (Archdeaconry of 
Canterbury, vol. 15, fo. 9.) 

The Will of John Htncklete of Haryetishm in the County of Kent 
and Diocese of Canterbury, 5 May 1577. My body to be buried in the 
churchyard of Haryetysham. To the poor. To the reparation of the 
church of Haryetisham 3s. 4d. To Alyce Fekyns, wife of John Fekyns, 
12d. To godson Henrye Hynckleye 12d. To Katheryne Lytlehare, my 
daughter's daughter. To my wife Avysse two bushels of wheat lying 
among the wheat of my son Roberte Hyncklye. All my goods and cattle 
to my wife Avysse and daughter Annys, and to the latter certain pewter 
aii'l household goods (specified), and at the age of twenty-one £10, to be 
paid by my son Robert. For default of payment, daughter Annys to en- 
ter into my chief messuage at Haryetsham, wherein Robert my son now 
dwelleth, and lands thereto belonging, until the sum be paid. If Annys 
die before her said age, my wife to have £5, and Henry Hyncklye and 
John Hyncklye, sons of my son John Hyncklye, shall have 20s. each. 
To Thomas Hyncklye, son of Robert Hyncklye my son. The residue of 
all goods and cattle unbequeathed now in the occupation of Robert Hynck- 
lye. 1 give to him, and make him executor. Henrye Smoothynge and 
Robert Wyllmott to be my overseers. 

My last will regarding all my lands and tenements in Haryetsham or 

• where iii the County of Kent. My tenement at Steden strete, where- 
in I now dwell, with a barn and certain lands adjoining called Stylles 
feylds, containing six acres, and two other pieces of land called Newman 
and chawke lande in Haryetsham, to wife Avysse and her heirs for the 

m of thirteen years after mydea . Li Bhe live bo long, paying the 

lord's rent, and 26s. 8d. a year to. John Hyncklye my BOn, to whom 1 leave 

the said property after my wife's decease or at the end of the said thirteen 
. at hi- death to revert to his bod Henry Hyncklye and his heirs male, 
and for want of such to the heirs male of my bod John, and for want of 
inch to Robert my son and his heirs male and for want of Buch to the 
it heir- of my bod John. Son Robert to have use of ponds oil said laud 
Iraw water. T<» bod John 13s. 4d. out of my messua lids now 

in the occupation of son Robert for seven ■ and a half after my de- 

(witb penalty tor non-payment). Whereas I have reserved unto my- 
self one loft chamber in the house where my son Robert now dwelleth with 
free u and i 2 . Avysse my wife Bhall have the same for one year 

r my de< To son Roberte Hynkslye for life my messuage win 

vol. lxv. 20 



288 Genealogical Research in England [July- 

he now dwelleth with all houses and buildings thereto belonging and all 
the rest of my lands, tenements, and hereditaments in the parish of Haryet- 
sham or elsewhere in the County of Kent, and after his decease I will them 
to his sons Isaacke Hyncklye and Thomas Hyncklye and their heirs male, 
and for want of such to the next heirs male of son Robert, and for want of 
such to Annys my daughter and her lawful issue, and for want of such to 
the right heirs of son Robert. " Whereas by my suffycyent dede sealed 
with my seale " I have given to Avysse my wife an annuity of 6s. 8d., it 
shall be paid out of the lands given to son Robert. If any of my sons 
seek to break the entail of my property, or if any legatee contest my will, 
the legacy of such person to be void. Witnesses : Rychard Elmestone, 
Clerk, Rychard Tassel], Nicholas Wade, and John Baker. Proved [at 
Lenham] 11 October 1577 by the oaths of Rychard Elmestone, clerk, John 
Baker, clerk, and Nicholas Wade, witnesses, by the executor named in the 
will. (Archdeaconry of Canterbury, vol. 43, fo. 30.) 
Inventory £15 9s. 6d. (Act Book, 1575-81, fo. 75.) 

The Will of Robert Hynckley of Harritesham in the County of Kent, 
6 April 1G05. My body to be buried in the churchyard of Harriteshame. 
To the poor of the parish. To daughter Catherine. To daughter Eliza- 
beth and her daughter Cicelye. To daughter Mary. To son Stephen 
Hinckley and his heirs for ever a messuage with the appurtenances there- 
to belonging, a barn and thirty three acres of woodland lying together, 
in the parish of Harritesham, the messuage and part of the land now in the 
occupation of Christopher Murfeild, and the residue in the occupation of me 
the said Robert Hynckley. To son Samuell Hynckley £30 " to be payd 
vnto my sayd sonne Samuell within one yeare next after my decease by my 
sonne Stephen aforenamed in consideracon that I have given vnto him the 
land aforementioned." In case of non-payment of this legacy Samuell to 
enter into the said lands and hold them until the legacy is paid. To son 
John Hinckley £20 to be paid by son Stephen when he come to the age 
of twenty-two years (with similar penalty for non-payment). To son 
Stephen all my goods, chattels, and moveables, and I make him executor. 
[Signed] The m'ke of the said Robert Hinckley. Witnesses : Thomas 
Phillips, writer hereof, and Robert Redgway. Codicil, dated 2 October 
1605. Thomas Hinckley and Isaacke Hinckley two other of my sons 
shall have all the residue of my lands and tenements not before bequeathed. 
[Same witnesses.] Proved 8 May 1607 by Stephen Hinckley, the execu- 
tor named in the will. (Archdeaconry of Canterbury, vol. 53, fo. 358.) 

The Will of Stephen Hinckle of Milton als Middleton, in the 
County of Kent, yeoman, 1 January 1629-30. My body to be buried in 
the churchyard of Milton. To the poor of Milton, at the discretion of 
brother Hills. To son Robert Hinckle and his heirs forever all that mes- 
suage or tenement with the appurtenances wherein Nevell Kempe now 
dwells, provided that he pay £5 to Frances, daughter of Nevell Kempe, 
when she come to the age of twenty-one. To daughter Martha, wife of 
the said Nevell Kempe, 10s. To son Robert household goods, and the 
furnace and brewing vessels in the brew house, and to daughter Elizabeth 
a chest, and all the rest of my household stuff to be equally divided be- 
tween them. To my wife Elizabeth the leases of M'she and of the arrable 
land. To my wife livestock, wheat, etc. The residue of my goods to son 



1911] Genealogical Research in England 289 

Robert Hinckle, whom I make executor. I make Richard Backe and 
Joell Hills overseers, and to the latter for his pains, £5. [Signed] Stephen 
Hinckle. Witnesses : Ben: Dowle and John Dowle. Proved 27 January 
1629-30 by Richard Backe, guardian of Robert Hinckle, son of the de- 
ceased, and executor named in the will, to whom commission was issued to 
execute during the minority of the said Robert. (Archdeaconry of Canter- 
bury, vol. 67, fo. 306.) 

[Joel Helles of Milton, yeoman, and Nevell Kempe of Milton, currier, 
were bondsmen for Richard Backe for £250, and the inventory of the goods 
amounted to £129 14s. 5d. (Archdeaconry of Canterbury, Act Book, 
1627-32, fo. 176.) On 6 May 1633 Robert Hinckle proved his father's 
will himself. (Archdeaconry of Canterbury, Act Book, 1633-7, fo. 39.)] 

The Will of Thomas Hinckly of Vlcombe in the County of Kent, yeo- 
man, 3 December 1634. To wife Ann the reversion of my house in 
Harisham for life, and after her death I leave it to sons Robert and Ed- 
ward, to whom 1 give 10s. each. To daughter Ann and her three child- 
ren, Thomas, Edward, and Martha, 10s. each. To daughter Elizabeth 
Hinckley £5 10s. All the rest of my goods and chattels to wife Ann, 
whom 1 make executrix. Witnesses : Thomas Cadner, James Hope, John 
Hope. Proved 16 January 1634-5 by Anne Hinckley, the relict and ex- 
ecutrix named in the will. (Archdeaconry of Canterbury, vol. 69, fo. 302.) 

Administration on the estate of Isaac Hinckley, late of the parish of 
Vlcombe, was granted to Dorothe Hinckly, widow of the deceased, 28 Sep- 
tember 1636. Bondsmen: George Hinckley of Bromfield, husbandman, 
and James Hinckly of Linstead, husbandman, in £140. (Archdeaconry 
of Canterbury, Act Book, 1633-7, fo. 211.) 

The Will of George Hinkley of Sandwich in the County of Kent, 
husbandman, 26 January 1661-2. To sister Susan Adams 12d. I make 
my sister Richarden How my executor, and leave to her all the rest of my 
goods and chattels. Witnesses : Gregory Bassett and Ed : Taylor. Proved 
21 February 1661-2 by the executrix named in the will. (Archdeaconry 
of Canterbury, vol. 71, fo. 111.) 

The Will of James Hinckley of Doddington in the County of Kent, 
yeoman, 15 November 1678. After the decease of my wife Mary Hinck- 
ley, I give my lands in Lingstead in the County of Kent, now' in the occu- 
pation of Thomas Hart, to my son Benj amine Hinckley and his heirs, and 
for want of such heirs to my daughter Elizabeth Hinckley and the heirs of 
her body, and for want of such heirs to the right heirs of me the said James 
Hinckley. Son Benjamine not to have said lands until he come to the 
age of twenty-four years. To my son-in-law John Bradford Is., and to my 
daughter Jane, his wife, 5s. a year for life and £5 one month after she be- 
come ;i widow. To .James Bradford and Mary Bradford, children of the 
.said .John Bradford, 10s. apiece. To my brother Symon Hinckley, my 
sister Frances Crumpe, widow, and my cousin James Hinckley, son of my 
brother George Hinckley, Is. each. To Dorothy Peniale, now wife of 
John Peniale, and Amy Moone, now wife of Anthony Moone, 5s. each. 
To my daughter Elizabeth Hinckley £80, to be paid to her when she 
come to the age of twenty years. My wife Mary to have the use of my 
personal estate toward the education and bringing up of my two children. 



290 Genealogical Research in England [July 

My wife and my cousin John Garner of Milstead, yeoman, overseers, and 
son Benjamine, executor. [Signed] James Hinckley his marke. Wit- 
nesses : James Allen, William Skeere, and Finch Allen. Proved 27 No- 
vember 1681, execution being granted to Mary Hinckley, the relict of the 
deceased and guardian of Benjamin Hinckley, son and executor named, 
during his minority. (Archdeaconry of Canterbury, vol. 75, fo. 265.) 

[Owing to a pressure of other contributions the balance of the Hinckley 
material is, of necessity, postponed to the October Register, in which it is 
hoped to print the Sealis and Tilden data. — Editor.] 

Paine 

[In addition to the foregoing material received from Miss French, the 
Committee presents the following data in relation to the ancestry of Moses 
Paine.] 

Among the emigrants from co. Kent, England, who came to New Eng- 
land with the company in The Castle in 1638, was Moses Paine (with his 
children Elizabeth, Moses, and Stephen), whose forebears had long resided 
in Frittenden and vicinity, among them Stephen Payne of Frittenden, 
supervisor of the will of Thomas Igymden in 1497. (See above, p. 175.) 

The emigrant's first marriage appears in the Marriage Licenses of Canter- 
bury : Moses Paine of Frittenden and Mar. Benison of Tenterden, virgin. 
At Tenterden. Hope Tilden of Sandwich, " grosser," bondsman. Dated Oct. 
12, 1615. 

This Hope Tilden was the Hopestill Tilden, brother of Nathaniel Tilden 
the emigrant to New England, whose will is to appear in a future num- 
ber of the Register. A few years after his marriage Moses Paine ap- 
pears in Tenterden, where the registers give the following records of 
some of his children and his second wife : 

] 620 Elizabeth Paine ye daughter of Moses Paine was baptized ye 23 of 
Julye. 

1623 Moses Payne son of Moses Payne baptized November [day miss- 
ing-] 

1632 Elizabeth wife of Moses Payne was buried the 11th October. 

The following entries from the parish registers of Frittenden give data 
in regard to the parents and brothers and sisters of Moses Paine : 

Baptisms, 1659-1640 

1563 Margaret daughter of Robt: Payne 26 July. 

1565 Katarine the daughter of Nicho: Payne 1 Julv. 

1569 Jo: Payne 15 May. 

1571 Grace & Jane, daughters of Nic: Payne 9 January [1571-2]. 

1573 Thom a s, sonn of Nic: Payne 12 June. 

1574 Jane daughter of Nic: Payne, 26 September 1574. 
1576 Tho: son of Nic: Payne 24 March [1576-7]. 
1578 Wm: & Eliz: children of Nicho: Payne 22 June. 
1581 Moses & Tabitha, children of Nicho: Payne 23 April. 
1598 Robt. sonn of Peter Payne 25 February [1598-9]. 
1600 Margaret daughter of Peter Payne 25 May. 

1602 Mary, daughter of Peter Payne 26 December. 

1640 Rob: sonne of John Payne and Martha, his wife 12 July. 



1911] Genealogical Research in England 291 

Marriages, 1561-16 40 

1589 Alice Burclon to Peter Payne 15 September. 

1597 Marian Fowle to Peter Payne, 7 July. 

1611 Mary Bezbeech to Nycholas Payne 9 July. 
1623 Gervace Morelyne & Margaret Payne 5 May. 
1629 John Burcher & Elizabeth Paynye (?) 9 November. 
1638 John Payne & Martha Buckhurst 13 November. 

Burials, 1561-1640 

1571 Grace, daughter of Nicho: Payne 10 January [1571-2]. 
1571 Jhane, daughter of Nicho: Payne 12 January [1571-2]. 
1575 Tho: son of Nicho: Payne 15 March [1575-6]. 

1577 Tho: son of Nicho: Payne 25 March. 

1578 Eliz: daughter of Nicho: Payne 20 July. 

1590 a daughter of Peter Payne 21 June. 

1590 Jo: sonn of Nicho: Payne 8 October. 

1591 Ann, wife of Nic: Payne 24 August. 
1591 a stil borne son of Peter Payne 6 October. 

1598 Robert, son of Peter Payne 2 March [1598-9]. 
1606 buried Wm: Payne a singleman 22 August. 

1606 a stilborne childe ["Twynn"] of Peter Payne 19 February [1606- 

7]- 
1610 Joyce [Maryan erased] wife to Nycholas Payne 18 January [1610- 

11]. 

1612 bur: Margarett Payne, wed: 12 February [1612-13]. 

1617 bur: Nicholas Payne, h. [householder] 24 January [1617-18]. 

1637 bur: Marrian, wife of Peter Payne 14 July. 

1638 bur: Peter Payne, an auncient householder 5 August. 

Paine Items from the Parish Registers of Biddenden, 1538-1640 

1585 Catherin Payne, serv 1 to Geo. Ramsden buried 14 February [1585-6]. 

1594 Rychard Price & Anne Pyne married 21 April. 

1595 Thomas Younge & Jone Payne married 9 September. 
1602 John, son of John Pye [sic'] bapt. 5 September. 

1610 Elizabeth y e daughter of Lawrence Payne bapt. 14 October 1610 

1610 Elizabeth y e daughter of Lawrence Payne buried 6 November. 

1611 Edmund, y e sonne of Lawrence Payne bapt. 22 December. 

161 1 Edmund y e sonne of Lawrence Payne buried 9 February [1611-12]. 

1614 Marye y e daughter of Lawrence Payne bapt. 10 April. 

1636 James Lawsey & Elizabeth Payne married 16 January [1636-7]. 

[To be continued] 



292 Notes [July 



PROCEEDINGS OF THE NEW ENGLAND HISTORIC 

GENEALOGICAL SOCIETY 

By John Albree, Recording Secretary 

Boston, Massachusetts, 1 March, 1911. A stated meeting of the New Eng- 
land Historic Genealogical Society was held at Pilgrim Hall, 14 Beacon Street, 
at 2.30 p.m., President Baxter presiding. 

The records of the February meeting were read and approved. 

The reports of the Corresponding Secretary, Librarian, and Historian were 
accepted. 

Upon acceptance of a report of the Council, on motion of Charles F. Read, 
it was 

Voted, That the President of the Society be authorized to appoint a member 
of the Society as one of a Standing Committee, to be composed of delegates 
from historical, patriotic and allied societies, to represent these societies in the 
matter of the change of the names of historic sites, streets or buildings in 
Massachusetts. 

The President appointed John Albree. 

One honorary member and eleven resident members were elected by ballot. 

Robert Lincoln O'Brien, editor of the Boston Herald, delivered an address on» 
Southern Battlefields To-day, in which he told of recent visits to the famous 
places of the Civil War, from Harper's Ferry to Appomattox, using slides made 
under his direction for purposes of illustration. 

On motion of Colonel Francis Hesseltine a vote of thanks was given to the 
speaker. 

After remarks by Hon. Henry Nichols Blake, late Chief Justice of Montana, 
and by Archibald M. Howe, it was voted at 3.55 p.m. to dissolve, after which 
refreshments were served. 

5 April, 1911. A stated meeting of the New England Historic Genealogical 
Society was held at Pilgrim Hall, 14 Beacon Street, at 2.30 p.m., Vice-President 
Cunningham presiding. 

The records of the March meeting were read and approved. 

The reports of the Librarian, Corresponding Secretary, Historian, and Coun- 
cil were read and accepted. 

It was voted to accept the recommendation of the Council, that the election 
of members be by printed ballots. 

Henry Edwards Scott and Walter Kendall Watkins were appointed tellers, 
and reported the unanimous election of thirteen resident members. 

The paper of the afternoon was by Hon. John Adams Aiken, Chief Justice of 
the Superior Court of Massachusetts, on The Mohawk Trail in 31assachusetts, 
in which he told how he followed this old Indian trail from Williamstown to 
Deerfield and identified the landmarks. 

On motion of Charles S. Rackemann, the thanks of the Society were voted 
to the speaker. 

After a report by Vice-President Cunningham as to the progress of the fund 
for a new building and the need of general, interested work on its behalf by 
members of the Society, it was voted at 3.45 to dissolve the meeting. Refresh- 
ments were then served. 



NOTES 

It having come to the attention of this Society that certain 
genealogists and publishers have used the name of the Society 
in connection with their own enterprises, the Society again de- 
sires to state that it has NO genealogical representatives in this 
country or in England, nor is it in any way connected with any 
publications other than those that it issues over its own name 
at 18 Somerset Street, Boston. 



1911] 



Notes 293 



The Committee on Ersglish Research desires to state, however, 
that although the Society has no official representative in England 
the Committee is employing Miss French as a record searcher there 
along special lines for the benefit of the Register. 

Whitney, a Correction. — In the Register of 1871 (vol.25, pp. 188 and 189), 
"vi. Lt.-Col. Danid Whitney" and " vn. Maj. Daniel Whitney" the name should 
be, I am sure, Daniel Whiting. See u Mass. Soldiers and Sailors of the Revo- 
lutionary War," vol. 17, pp. 166-7. Oliver A. Roberts. 

Masonic Temple, Boston. 



Meade. — In the Register of Derry Cathedral, recently published by the Parish 
Record Society of Dublin, vol. 8, p. 214, is this entry: "Richard Meade, a 
stranger out of New England, buried 16 th [December 1672]." This is, probably, 
the Richard Meade, son of Richard of Roxbury, Mass., of whom Savage (vol. 3, 
p. 191) says : u a mariner, wh. d. bef. 15 Feb. 1079, when the f. took admin, on 
the est. but that s. was, I think, not b. at R." (Ex. inform. Charles K. Bolton.) 

The Editor. 



Scammon, Atkins. — The Scammon genealogy states that the first known of 
Humphrey Scammon was the birth of his son Humphrey at Kittery, 1677, dur- 
ing the Indian war; but before the war, 7 May 1674, Humphrey Scammon. no 
addition or residence given, bought land in Wells from Nathaniel Fryer of Great 
Island. The will of Mrs. Elizabeth Saffyn, widow of Mr. Peter Lidgett of Bos- 
ton, dated 14 Apr. 1682, gives her brother John Scammond £20; brother Rich- 
ard Scammond £20; sister Anne Waldron £20; cousin Elizabeth Attkins. my 
brother John Scammond's daughter, £40; cousin Jeane Scammond, daughter 
of my brother Richard Scammond, £60 ; cousin Hannah Gerrish £5. As brother 
John was first named he was presumably the eldest, and my theory is that Hum- 
phrey was his son, born 1640, his sister Elizabeth being remembered by her aunt 
in Boston as her namesake. This Elizabeth Atkins I surmise may have been 
the wife of Thomas Atkins at the mouth of the Kennebec, who left ten daugh- 
ters and no sons, among them Elizabeth, who married Davis ; Anne, who 

married Samuel Clark of Marblehead; Sarah, who married Samuel Gurney of 

Little Compton: Susannah, who married Green; Hester, who married 

George Pike of Mendon ; Rachel, who married James Berry of Boston ; Abigail, 
who married Thomas Washburn of Bridgewater ; and Ruth, who married John 
Haskins of Scituate. My conjecture is that John Scammon and his family may 
have lived in remote parts, and came out to the older settlements when they fore- 
saw trouble with the Indians. It seems hardly possible that so active a man 
as the first Humphrey Scammon could have lived about Portsmouth until 34 
years old before getting his name into any record. Can anything be added or 
detracted from the foreging? Charles Thornton Libby. 

Portland, Me. 



Robie. — The Register, vol. 60, p. 92, gives extracts from the journal of Dr. 
Ebenezer Robie during his visit to England in 1726, including a copy of the re- 
cords in a Robie family Bible which he found among the relatives in Yorkshire. 
Three of the familv were marked "went to N. E.," namelv : Henrv, born 12 
Feb. 1618; Samucl/born 12 Feb. 1628; and William, born 26 Apr. 1648. The 
first two were brothers, their father being Thomas, and their brother Thomas 
was the father of William who was the father of Dr. Ebenezer. Savage saw 
this journal, but conjectured that Samuel might have lost his life in the English 
wars before getting away for New England. On the contrary, Samuel Robie 
lived perhaps thirty years in the vicinity of his brother in New Hampshire (the 
one at Hampton, the other at New Castle), married a sister of the distinguished 
councilor and military man, Col. Shadrach Walton, and left probably three chil- 
dren. The reason why Savage missed him, doubtless, was that lie Lived in the 
city instead of in the country, on Great Island, the Boston of New Hampshire, 
afterwards New Castle, the city of shops and rented houses, politicians and high 
life, fort soldiers and taverns, but without the saving puritanism of Boston. 

The few mentions of Samuel Robie which Savage failed to observe arc as fol- 
lows : 



294 Notes [July 

1665, July, petition signed by Sam llobie; his name preceded by George Walton 

and followed by Edward West, who also married a daughter of Walton. 
1677. The minister's rates for Great Island show Sam Robie taxed at 6 shil- 
lings, followed seriatim by Ed Cater, Jno. Clark, Geo. Walton, Sen., " forthe 
town," George Walton. Jr. 
1G78, March 22, an apportionment of the inhabitants among the tythingmen 
named consecutively: George Walton, Sen., Jno. Menseene, Sam Robie, Wid. 
Joanes. 
1682, May 30. Mr. Roby concerned in a law suit between George Walton and 

Henry Crown. 
1682, Aug. In the trial of Goody Jones for stoning George Walton by witch- 
craft, among the witnesses were u John Shaw, servant of Samuel Roby," 
Thomas Roby who was working on George Walton's boat, Walton Roby, 
Samuel Walton and Elizabeth Treworthy. 
1686. In the will of George Walton, Sen., he gave forty acres of laud to Thomas 
Roby, Walton Roby, and Elizabeth Treworthy. 

Another grandchild, doubtless, was Mary Roby, who was married at Ports- 
mouth, 13 Aug. 1683, to William Tetherly ; administered on his estate, 1693; 
and was married again to John Lydston. She bore children : Mary, 8 May 1684 ; 
William. 3 Nov. 1685; Samuel, 26 Feb. 1686-7; Elizabeth, 20 July 1689; and 
others as late as about 1701, or possibly much later, as her younger Lydston 
children were not recorded. This is inconsistent with her being Samuel Roby's 
widow, but quite consistent with her being sister to Thomas Roby who was 
working on George Walton's boat in 1682. The fact that she was not mentioned 
in her grandfather's w 7 ill is without significance. There were no small bequests 
in his will ; he gave everything to his wife, except certain lands to his chosen 
heir, Shadrach, afterwards colonel, and to some unprotected grandchildren. 
This Mary Roby could not have been Henry Roby's daughter Mary, as she was 
married at Hampton, 22 Dec. 1663, to Samuel Folsoni ; and the nephew, William 
Roby, was not old enough to be her father. 

That this William Roby came first to New Castle, before settling in Boston, is 
shown by his deposition, 21 July, 1679, aged 30, to the effect that being desired 
by George Walton to take account and value the goods that were in the shop 
that his daughter Taprielle kept, etc. Also by his serving as an appraiser with 
his nncle Henry Roby on the estate of another of George Walton's daughters, 
Martha West. Still another Walton-Roby incident was the conveyance of a house 
and land by George Walton to Henry Roby, 1662. 

Incidentally speaking, it should have been noticed long since that Henry Roby's 
wife Ruth, who died at Hampton 5 May 1673, was the daughter of William 
Moore .of Exeter and Ipswich, mentioned in his will, 14 Aug. 1660, and sister of 
Capt. William Moore of Exeter. The father and son Moore are made one in 
Bell's History of Exeter. Charles Thornton Libby. 

Portland, Me. 



Ayer Family Bible Records. — From the family Bible of Richard G. Aver 
of Haverhill, Mass., now in the possession of his widow at No. 2 South Street, 
Haverhill, containing information not published in the Vital Records of Haver- 
hill. 

Births 

Richard Aver was Born July 12. 1789. 
Hitty Head was Born April 26, 1795. 

[Children] 

Harriet M. Ayer was Born May 16, 1816. 

Amos Head Aver " " March 17. 1818. 

Peter Eaton Ayer " " Oct. 30, 1819. 

Richard G. Ayer " " July 12, 1821. 

Abigail Eaton Aver " " July 24, 1823. 

Elizabeth B. Ayer " " June 3, 1825. 

Richard G. Ayer " " Oct. 21, 1828. 

Deaths 

Bitty Aver Died Feb. 9, 1871, JE To. 
Richard Ayer died Sept. — , 1832 M 43. 



1911] Notes 295 

Amos H. Ayer Died April 29, 1879. 

Elijah Hall Died June 3, 1855 IE 71. 

Hendrick Hall Did January 13, 1838 M 27. 

Harrison L. Hall Died Nov. 21, 1848, Aged 7 years 7 months. 

Thomas Hall Died April 9, 18G8. 

Births 

Richard G. Aver was Born Oct. 21, 1828. 
Catharine Hall » " April 23, 1835. 

[Children] 

Marantha L. Ayer was Born Oct. 24, 1852. 
Josie K. Ayer " " April 5, 1865. 

Richard G." Ayer " " Dec. 27, 1867. 

Hendrick Hall was Born Feb. 29 [sic] 1811. 
Thomas Hall " " March 25, 1819. 

Catharine Sancry ■« " Nov. 24, 1813. 

[Children] 

Catharine Hall was Born April 23, 1835. 

Hendrick Hall " " Nov. 19, 1837. 

Harrison L. Hall " " April 25, 1841. 

Jesse F. Hall " " March 7, 1843. 

Thomas J. Hall " . " May 13, 1845. 

Elizabeth A. Hall " " Jan. 22, 1848. 

Fannv L. Hall " " Oct. 6, 1851. 

Richard Aver Hall " " Aug. 25, 1854. 

Emma J. Hall " " Oct. 3, 1856. 

Marriages 

Hendrick Hall to Catharine Sancry, June 23, 1834. 
Thomas Hall to Catharine Hall, Feb. 19, 1840. 
Richard G. Ayer to Catharine Hall, Aug. 27, 1850. 

Deaths 

Hendrick Hall Died Jan. 13, 1838. 
Thomas Hall " April 9, 1868. 
Fanny L. Hall " Jan. 28, 1869. 
Catharine Hall ,l Feb. — , 1899. 
Hitty Ayer »■ Feb. 9, 1871. 

Lizzie B. Aver " Feb. 17, 1861. 
Abigail E. Batchelder Died Aug. 16, 1884. 
Richard G. Ayer Died Aug. 21, 1891. 
29 Hillside Avenue, Maiden, Mass. GEORGE Walter Chamberlain. 



Thkadway, Hayn'ks, Howe. — That Nathaniel Treadway's wife, Sufferana, 
was the daughter of Walter 1 Haynes of Sudbury, and not of Elder Kdward 
Howe of Watertown. as stated in 1860 by both Savage and Bond, is the inevi- 
table conclusion from a study of the case in its various aspect 

Mrs. Alice Haynes of Semley, Wilts, in her will dated 2 March 1620-1, men- 
tioned her son Walter Haynes, bis son Thomas and daughter Elizabeth, and 

feraine and Marie Haynes, her granddaughters (Register, vol. 89, pp. 268-4). 

Walter Haynes with his wife Elizabeth, sons Thomas, .John, and Josias 
fonder 16), and daughters Suflranc and Mary, came in the Confidence In l<>38 
(Drake's Pounders of New England, p. 57). 

Both Walter 1 Haynes and Nathaniel 1 Treadway had settled in Sudbury by 

1689, as they are found in the list of " 1688 or L689 " given by Hudson (History 
of Sudbury, p. 20). That they were, comparatively, near neighbors is seen by 
the map of the early settlement (Ibid, p. 76). 

The next definite fact regarding Sufferana 9 Haynes is found in the will of 
Walter 1 Haynes, dated 25 May 1659, "signed again by mee M I March 1668-4, 
and proved 4 April 1666, who mentions his wile Elizabeth, Ids four children 
now in New England, John Haynes, Josiah Haynes, Suffirany [or Suflrans] 
Treddoway, and Mary Noyes; also his Bon-in-law Thomas Noyes, son-in-law 
Roger Gourd and daughter Gourd in England, and "lands in Sudbury which 



296 Notes [July 

were sometime owned by mv son Thomas Haynes" (Middlesex Co. Probate, 
No. 10939). 

Thomas Noyes of Sudbury, by his will made 20 August 1664 and proved 2 April 
1667, left " twenty shillings apiece unto ye two eldest daughters of brother 
Tredaway." To each of his three sisters he left twenty shillings, and. except 
two other small legacies, all the rest of his estate, real and personal, to his wife 
Mary. Overseers : Mr. Joseph Noyes and Josiah Haynes. Witnesses : Joseph 
Noyes, Mary Treadway, Thomas Battelle, Ralph Day. (Middlesex Co. Probate, 
No. 16084.) 

Savage tells us that Sufferana 2 Haynes married Josiah Treadway of Sudbury. 
Hudson repeats this statement, changing the residence to Watertown and adding 
that in the will of Walter Haynes his daughter Sufferance is mentioned lt as 
being the wife of Josiah Treadway" (History of Sudbury, p. 33). This state- 
ment, however, is erroneous, for the given name of Sufferana's husband does 
not appear in connection with her father's will nor the probate of his estate; 
nor does Thomas Noyes mention it. Mary Noyes. widow of Thomas, married 
secondly Michael Bacon of Woburn, 28 November 1670 (Woburn Marriages, 
p. 14). He died 4 July 1683, and she died at Sudbury 1 March 1697-8. Her 
estate was not, apparently, settled by the probate court of the county, but she 
disposed of some, at least, of her real estate by deeds in 1669, 1670, 1696, and 
1697. Neither John 2 Haynes nor Josiah 2 Haynes left any legacy to their sister 
Sufferana or any of her family. 

A somewhat extended search, including probate, land, and court records of 
Middlesex and Suffolk counties, the printed records of the Colony, the lists of 
early emigrants, Pope's Pioneers, and the lists of early proprietors printed in 
the histories of Sudbury and Watertown, fails to reveal any evidence of a 
Josiah Treadway in the Colony until the birth in 1650 of Josiah 2 (Nathaniel 1 ). 

Nathaniel Treadway was married by 1639 or the early part of 1640. for his 
first child, Jonathan, was born at Sudbury 11 November 1640. Mary, daughter 
of Nathaniel and Suffranv Treadwav, was born at Sudbury 1 August 1642. 
Their daughter Elizabeth was born at Watertown 3d of the 2d mo. 1646, and 
Deborah, 2d of the 6th mo. 1657. The other children, James. Lydia. and Josiah, 
mentioned in their father's will, were not recorded. Nathaniel Treadway died 
at Watertown 20 July 1689, and Sufferana his wife died there 22 July 1682. 

A comparison of the Christian names of Nathaniel Treadway's children with 
those of the Haynes family is highly suggestive. Sufferana Haynes's mother 
was Elizabeth. She had sisters Elizabeth and Mary, and a brother Josiah. 
The latter named a daughter Deborah, and John 2 Haynes named a son James. 

Nathaniel Treadway of Watertown, with John Haynes, Josiah Haynes, and 
Thomas Noyes, all of Sudbury, purchased a tract of 3200 acres of land at 
w Quansicamug" Pond in 1664 and 1665 (Middlesex Co. Deeds, vols. 3. p. 69, and 
7, p. 194; Mass. Bay Records, vol. 4, pt. 2, p. 293; Hudson's Sudbury, p. 163). 

Erom the foregoing it is seen that Sufferana Haynes was of the right age ; 
that she married a man named Treadway ; that she had more than two daugh- 
ters by 1664 : that Nathaniel Treadway lived near her in Sudbury ; that he was 
married to a Sufferana not long after her arrival from England ; that his chil- 
dren's names are, with two exceptions, found also in the Haynes family ; that 
he had gained the confidence of her brothers and brother-in-law to a degree 
which led to their busiuess association twenty years after his removal from 
Sudbury ; and that there must have been visiting between the families, as his 
eldest daughter was a witness to Thomas Noyes's will. 

When it is also considered that not only can there be found no Josiah Tread- 
way, but no other in the Colony of the name except Nathaniel Treadway, until 
Nathaniel's sons were born, it seems almost superfluous to consider the Howe 
statement at all. 

Elder Edward Howe of Watertown made his will 13 June 1644. giving to 
Nathaniel Treadaway about thirteen acres of land, an equal interest with Mrs. 
Margaret Howe ye " Jinne Stonne ye wife of John Stonne of Sudbury " in the 
wiers and in money due from Mr. Thomas Mayhew, and, after his wife Marga- 
ret's death, whatever estate, real or personal, might be left, except that li Anne 
Stonne shall haue one third part of all the Cattle " (Suffolk Co. Probate, vol. 1, p. 
31; Register, vol. 3, p. 77). 

Widow Margaret How of Watertown made her will " The eight of the Second 
1647." It was proved 18 December 1660, before which time she had become 



1911] 



Notts 297 



Mrs. George Bunker. She gave one half of her whole estate to Nathaniel 
Treadaway, one third to John Stone, and one sixth to her sister Mary Rogers, 
widow, and her children John and Elizabeth Rogers in England, if living at 
time of her decease, otherwise this sixth to be divided by Treadway and Stone, 
three fifths to the former and two fifths to Stone. (Middlesex Co. Probate, 
No. 12074.) 

In neither of these wills is Nathaniel Treadway called son or son-in-law, 
while Snfferana is not even alluded to in either; nor is Ann Stone's relationship 
to either Howe expressed. Several deeds are recorded in which some of the 
land received by Nathaniel Treadway under Howe's will was disposed of. It 
is described as "land which Sometime was Elder Howe's," " land commonly 
Called by ye name of Hows field," and " land originally granted to Elder How 
of Watertown." On 4 July 1728, Josiah Treadway of Charlestown sold u all 
my right ... in Common or undivided lands in the Township of Watertown 
. . . that is to Say the right of M r Edward How formerly of said Town given 
by him (with his other Estate) in his last will ... to my father Nathaniel 
Treadway and by him conveyed to me" (Middlesex Co. Deeds, vol. 29, p. 102). 

Whether Nathaniel Treadway and Ann Stone were brother and sister and 
Edward Howe was their uncle, or the kinship was more remote, or they were 
his wards, may later be settled, but at present it is matter for speculation only. 

59 Oxford Street, Somerville, Mass. Miss Ella F. Elliot. 



Page. — Bond's History of Watertown, p. 383, states that Samuel 3 Page, son 
of Samuel 2 Page, w r ent to South Carolina. The following deeds and wills prove 
that it was Samuel 3 Page, son of John 2 and Faith (Dunster) Page, who went to 
South Carolina, that he married twice, had a large family and, returning to Gro- 
ton, finally settled at Lunenburg with most of his children. 

In vol. 16 of the Middlesex Co. Deeds are three deeds filed on the same date, 
8 June 1713. and following each other in the book. The first (p. 311) : " John 
Page of Groton, Middlesex Co. husbandman do give to my loving son Samuel 
Page of Groton ... a five acre right lying ... in Groton . . . first for his 
houselot fifteen acres bounding Southerly on the land of John Longley, Norther- 
ly upon my own land, easterly upon the Country Highway, Westerly upon the 
Town Comon. Nextly five acres lying upon ye River, bounded upon ye river 
Westerly, Southwardly by the land of Samuel Davis, Northwardly and East- 
wardly by my own land, and Thirdly Three acres of Intervale lying upon the 
West side of the river bounding by the land of Deacon Lawrences, Southward 
and Northward by my own land Westward by the Town Comon eastward by the 
river. . . [other pieces mentioned] . . . and I the said Samuel Page do receive 
this the above written as my full portion given me by my honored Father* and 
. . . bind myself . . . not to molest the abovesaid John Page . . . for any 
more of his estate without the s'd John Page my honored father sees just cause 
for to give it to me by Will or Deed," etc. Signed by John Page, Sr., and Sam- 
uel Page, 13 Jan. 1093. 

Second deed (p. 311) : Samuel Page of South Carolina, formerly of Groton, 
Mass., and Nathaniel Lawrence of Charlestown, sell to Stephen Holden of Groton 
land in Groton, 5 June 1713. 

Third deed (p. 312) : lt Samuel Page Senr of South Carolina . . . for and in 
consequence of £38 3s. paid by Joseph Sanderson of Groton" . . . sells to him 
u a five acre right lying and being in Groton as followetli, First the houselot 
of fifteen polo wide, the whole length of the Lott, bounded Southerly upon 
land of John Longley, Northerly on land of John Page, easterly on the country 
Highway, Westerly the town Comon . . . also live acres . . . bounded W . . 
upon the river. S . . by land of Samuel Davis. N . . and E . . by lands of John 
Page" [etc., for all other pieces mentioned in the first deed]. Signed by Samuel 
Page 30 Apr. 1713. 

This Samnel Page married first a daughter of Nathaniel Lawrence, probably 
Sarah Lawrence who deceased before her father, as in his will in 1718 he leaves 
a bequest to son Samnel Page (Lawrence Genealogy, vol. 17. p. is). By the word- 
big of the will of Samuel Page l should judge i he following children belonged to 
her : Samuel, horn 1692, John, Joseph, Jonathan, William, Nathaniel, and David, 
and perhaps the daughter Sarah. On hi- return from South Carolina lie settled 
at Lunenburg, but entered the births of two children on the Groton records, viz. 
Elizabeth and Daniel. On the Lunenburg records be entered these children with 



298 Notes [July 

the rest of his family, and at this time he had a wife Martha. Children on rec- 
ord : Elizabeth, born 23 Mar. 1719; Zachariah, born 10 Apr. 1721, died 1721; 
Daniel, bom 10 Aug. 1722 ; Martha, born 31 May 1725, died 1728 ; Benjamin, born 
12 Oct. 1727 ; Thomas, born 6 Sept. 1730. In 1740 the death of John Page, son 
of Mr. Samuel Page, at Jamaica is recorded " Being there on ye Spanish expe- 
dition." His wife Martha died in 1746, and he married thirdly, 9 July 1747, Sarah 
Parce of Leominster. He died on 7 Sept. 1747. His will (Worcester Co. Pro- 
bate, vol. 2, p. 655), proved 3 Nov. 1747, is peculiar in the order of the naming 
of the children. It would seem that the children by the first wife had already 
received property from him, because he starts with specific bequests to the sons 
of Martha, mentioning first " son Daniel, son Thomas," his daughters " Heirs 
of dau. Sarah Earnsworth dec'd," " dau. Elizabeth Parker," then u goldheaded 
cane to son Samuel Page," and " all the residue to be divided between my sons 
Samuel Page, Joseph Page, William Page, Nathaniel Page, and David Page," 
with reservations for wife Sarah. Sons Jonathan and Nathaniel Page, executors. 

All the sons, with the exception of Samuel Jr., settled with the father at Lu- 
nenburg. Samuel Page, Jr., returned to Charlestown, and married, 20 May 1719, 
Susanna Page. He lived there for some years, but settled finally at Medford. 
He died in 1749, and his age at death makes him born in 1692, so that he must 
have been the eldest son. In his will he mentions, besides his family, his prop- 
erty at Medford, Charlestown, and Lunenburg. It would seem probable from 
this data that Samuel Page, Sr.,'s first wife, Sarah Lawrence, died in South Car- 
olina, and that he married his second wife there. 

Dorchester, Mass. Mary L. Holman. 



Notes from English Records.— Hodges v. Brand. 10 Oct. 8 Car. I [1632]. 
Subject, John Hodges of Limehouse, Mariner. Whereas the 20th of July 1630 
Benjamin Brand of Edwardstone, co. Suffolk, gent, then being in New England, 
did stand indebted to your subject 184 lbs. of beaver to be paid to your Subject 
at his next recourse into New England. Whereas your Subject in December 1631 
repaired to Edwardstone to get satisfaction of his debt. Benjamin Brand did 
agree to pay £15, which he appointed Joseph Brande of London, Merchant, his 
brother, to pay at Edwardstone. Your Subject repaired to London, but Joseph 
Brande refused to pay the £15-0-0. Writ is asked for against Benjamin Brand. 

The answer of Benjamin Brand. That it only ought to be paid in New Eng- 
land. Mr. Samuel Marvericke, then & yet in New England, doeth owe unto this 
deft 15 lbs of beaver & Mr. Graves 10 lbs, and Mr. Gibbons 7 lbs. That he had 
told the compt that he could have all the beaver in the above hands for payment 
if he went agayne to New England. Sworne 19 Nov. 8 Car. I [1632]. (Court of 
Requests, 59 : 3.) 

11 March 12 Car. I [1637]. Subjects Henry Beale and Peter Lenarth of Lon- 
don, Merchant. Peter Lenarth dec. uncle to said Peter. Adventure of a fishing 
boat in New England. Edward Beale brother to your Subject. The ship was 
unladen & layd up by John Angell & Edward Beale. One John White, John 
Watts, & Richard Bushrode now deed & others did joyn together & become a 
company & did make a plantacon near Cape Anne called Dorchester & employed 
John Watts of Dorchester as their agent. To obtain payment for salte, boats 
etc. 

Defts Wm Whiteway senr, Joseph Underwood, John Cooke, Wm Loder, 
Patricolus Cook, Josiah Terry, Edmund Dashwood, John Hills, [ ] Loder, Denys 
Bond, George Way, James Gould, Wm Derby, Tho Devenish, Robert Coker, 
Benjamin Devenish, Barnard Troupe, Richard Savage, John Blackford, Richard 
[ ], Wm Spering, Richard Watts, Mathew Bonger, Sir Richard Strode, Sir Wal- 
ter Erie Knt, John Browne esq, & Margaret Allen widdow. (Court of Requests, 
48, pt. 2.) 

Pearson v. Kirbye. May 1667. Orator Henry Pearson of Southampton in 
Longe Island, an Ancient. Whereas about May 1659, before your Orator went 
out of this Realme, your Orator lent to John Brimley of Olney, Bucks, £21 on 
security of three acres of land in Olney. Brimley neglected to repay the prin- 
cipal & interest & died in the Orators debt. Your Orator before his departure 
by letter of attorney appointed Edward Fuller of Olney, William Geynes of 
Olney, Mercer, Thomas Consteble of the same, all now deceased, to recover his 
debts. Daniel Howes, in right of his wife Jane, has sold the lands to Jo Kirby 
of Olney, Haberdasher. Object of this suit is to obtain principal & interest. 



1911] 



Notes 299 



The answer of John Kirby is that he purchased the lands about eight or nine 
years ago free from mortgage. Sworn at Olney 7 Nov. 1664. (Chancery Pro- 
ceedings before 1714. C 22 : 113.) 

Neale v. Gibbes. 12 June 14 Charles I [1638]. Subject & servant Walter 
Neale of London, esq. Whereas about seven or eight years ago your Subject 
was imployed in New England as commander of a Collonie there. One John 
Gibbs, master of a ship, came to the said Plantacon and intreated your subject 
to receive some small p'cell of goods & brought the Surgeon of the Plantacon to 
testefle the want of such commodities, your Subject replyed that if he would 
leave his goods there he might, but your Subject would not become his Pay- 
master for that the said Gibbs must expect his money in England from the Com- 
pany in London. About a year ago Gibbs came & said he had not received the 
money for the goods left in New England. Gibbs has commenced a suit against 
your Subject contrary to all equity, pretending your Subject promised him pay- 
ment. A writ is asked for against John Gibbs, Sir Eerdinando Georges knt, 
John Mason esq, John Cotton, George Griffiths, Win Cotton, Richard Pulford, 
Thomas Wanuerton, Henry Gardiner, & Thomas Eyre. (Court of Bequests, 
47, pt. 1.) Gerald Eothergill. 

11 Brussels Road, New Wandsworth, London, Eng. 



Historical Intelligence 

Grazebrook-Sewall. — An interesting feature shown in Mr. George Graze- 
brook's Pedigree of the Eamily of Grazebrook, omitted from the book notices 
(p. 194), is the male descent of the ancestors of Margaret Grazebrook, the 
mother of the Henry Sewall, born in April 1576, emigrated to New England and 
died in 1657, three of whose descendants became chief justices of Massachusetts. 



Anne Hutchinson Memorial. — A bronze tablet to the memory of Mrs. Anne 
Hutchinson has been erected at Split Rock by the Colonial Dames of the State of 
New York. Money will be needed for grading, sodding, shrubbery, paths, 
railing, etc.. and subscriptions for these purposes may be sent to J. Edward 
Weld,' 55 East 59th Street, New York City. 



Lee Family in England. — Eugene F. McPike, 1 Park Row, Chicago, re- 
ports that considerable information concerning the early history of the Lee 
family in England has already been collected by Ralph J. Beevor, M.A., 
(Trinity Collge, Cambridge), of "Langley," Lemsford Road, St. Albans, Eng- 
land. Mr. Beevor is also interested in the genealogy of other families, including 
Hare, Ilalley, Hawley, Parry, Pike, Pyke, Stuart, etc., and might, perhaps, be 
willing to open communication with serious investigators, who should enclose 
response-coupon. 



Eugenics and Genealogy.— The attention of all genealogists is called to the 
recent establishment of the Eugenics Record Office at Cold Spring Harbor, Long 
Island. X. Y., by the Eugenics Section of the American Breeders' Association. 
This office *has for its object the study of the inheritance of mental and physical 
traits in the human family, and while the data required is largely of a biological 
nature it is believed that there is a close connection between its work and that 
of the genealogies, and co-operation is sincerely offered and earnestly solicited. 
It is hoped that it may be possible to establish a reference library of current 
genealogies which will be of great value in connecting links and in verifying 
and extending pedigrees, and any contributions to such a library will be grate- 
fully received. The office also solicits correspondence and collaboration, and 
cordially invites any who are interested to pay a personal visit to it and learn 
further of the work. Address C. B. Davenport, Secretary. 



Vermont Vital Records Act.— The following act was introduced by Sena- 
tor Darling at the last session of the Vermont legislature, and took effect upon 
its passage : 



300 Notes [July 

Au Act Requiring Town Clerks to Transmit Birth, Marriage and Death Records, 
Not Previously Returned, to Secretary of State. 

It is hereby enacted by the General Assembly of the State of Vermont: 

Section 1. As soon as practicable after the passage of this act the secretary 
of state shall ascertain from what towns and for what years returns of births, 
marriages and deaths have not been made to the state, or are not to be found 
among the archives of his office, and shall convey this information to the clerks 
of such towns, together with suitable blanks upon which to make returns. 

Sec. 2. It shall be the duty of such town clerks to transcribe in full upon 
said blanks all records of births, marriages and deaths in the possession of the 
town, and churches, not already returned, and to transmit the same, properly 
certified, to the secretary of state within such reasonable time as may be allowed 
by him, but not later than October 1, 1911, and for such service the town clerk 
shall receive from the town the sum of five cents for each record so transcribed, 
certified and transmitted. 

Sec. 3. All records returned, under this act, to the secretary of state shall 
be so filed and indexed as to be made readily available for reference, and when 
required for any legal purpose, the secretary, of state shall furnish a certified 
copy, under his seal, free of all expense. 

Sec. 4. This act shall take effect upon its passage. 

Leighton P. Slack, President of the Senate. 

Frank E. Howe, Speaker of the House of Representatives. 

Approved December 14, 1910. 

John A. Mead, Governor. 



Salvage from the Fire in the New York State Library, Albany 

Books 

From the 450,000 printed books which were destroyed with the New York 
State Library in the fire of March 29, there were saved no more than 10,000 
volumes. About one-third of this salvage was from the general reading and 
reference room and comprised the standard cyclopedias and sets, partial or 
complete, of the more important general periodicals. The other two-thirds of 
the salvage was from the collections on local history and genealogy. Exclusive 
of general works on United States history, regimental histories, church histories 
and manuals, the collections in local history and genealogy comprised about 
15,000 volumes — 7000 genealogies, 8000 state, town and county histories. Per- 
haps one-third of these were saved— 4000 volumes of the local history and 1000 
individual genealogies. The loss in the latter subject was complete in the de- 
partment of vital records, church registers, heraldry, and genealogical periodi- 
cals. The local history saved consisted principally of material relating to New 
York, New Jersey and Pennsylvania. Most of the books on Connecticut, 
Massachusetts, and all of Rhode Island were totally destroyed. It is probable 
that when the final counting is made the salvage in this department will be 
rather less than indicated by the above figures, for many of the books counted 
with the salvage will prove to be so badly burned, or odd volumes of sets, that 
it will be either impossible or unwise to rebind them. 

The salvage is being rapidly catalogued. This will have been finished by June 
1. At that time active efforts will be begun to rebuild the collections. To this 
end, the Library will be glad to have the help of all who are interested in these 
subjects, and gifts will be welcomed from every direction. As the salvage is 
so considerable, it will be well to ascertain first from the Library whether con- 
templated gifts are needed. Lists of books sent to the New York State Library, 
162 State St., Albany, N. Y., will be examined with care and promptness. It 
is to families, or publishers of genealogies and items of local history, that the 
Library gratefully acknowledges so much help in making its collection pre- 
eminent in the past, and because of this assistance it looks to the same sources 
with confidence for material help in its restoration. 

Manuscripts 

N. Y. Col. Mas., 1G38-1800. 103 v. About 70 v. saved, in fairly good state of 
preservation. 



1911] 



Notes 301 



V. 1-19 and 23 are in Dutch, and the rest in English. Of the Dutch mss. 
all but the first volume (containing contracts, leases, wills, powers of 
attorney, etc.), 1638-41, have been saved. Of the English mss. the lost 
volumes relate largely to the administrations of colonial governors during 
the periods 1685-87, 1700, 1702-4, 1721-41, 1762-69, 1771-2, and to the boun- 
dary dispute between New York and Massachusetts, 1785-1800. 

Land Patents, GG and HH, 1630-64. Both volumes saved. 

General Entries and (Executive) Orders, Letters, Warrants, etc., 1664- 
1712. 10 v. Nearly all lost. 

Court of Assizes, 1668-72. 1 v. Fragment saved. 

Council Minutes, 1668-1783. 28 v. Saved about 20 v. ; some badly burned. 

Sir Wm. Johnson Mss., 1733-1808. 26 v. Saved 4 v. in good state of preser- 
vation and fragments of a few others. 

George Clinton Papers, 1765-1840. 52 v. Saved about 10 v. in good condi- 
tion and fragments of a few others. 

D. D. Tompkins Papers, 1795-1845. 36 v. Saved portions of 10 or more vol- 
umes, some in fair condition, others badly burned. 

Assembly Papers, 1777-1830. 44 v. Saved about 20 volumes, many in excel- 
lent condition. 

Legislative Papers (Senate), 1777-1803. 13 v. Saved parts of 5 volumes in 
fairly good condition. 

Legislative Files (Unbound Papers of Senate and Assembly), 1777-1910. 
About 100,000 papers. Saved about 2000 papers, nearly all badly burned. 

State Census Returns, 1801, 1807, 1814, 1821, 1845-11)05. About 700 v. Saved 
fragments of 1801, 1814 and 1821. 

Marriage Bonds, 1736-83. 41 v. Saved about 12 volumes, all badly burned. 

Minutes of the Provincial Congress, etc., 1775-78. Original drafts, 6 v. ; 
engrossed minutes, 10 v. ; saved fragments of volumes of both sets in badly 
burned condition. 

Correspondence of the Provincial Congress, entitled " Revolutionahy 
Papers," 1755-77. 12 v. Saved portions of some volumes in fairly good 
condition. 

Papers Laid Before the Provincial Congress, 1775-78. 16 v. Saved frag- 
ments of some volumes, most of them badly burned. 

Mss. of the Colony and State of New York, relating to the Revolution- 
ary Wail 1775-lsOO. 52 v. in 55. Saved the contents of some 20 volumes 
in good condition. 

Treasurer's Certificates, for service in the N. Y. levies and militia during 
the Revolutionary War, 1776-b3. 10 v. All saved, but one corner of vol- 
umes destroyed. 

Files of the Council of Appointment, 1777-1821. About 10,000 papers, un- 
bound. Saved about 300 to 400 in good condition. 

Records of the War. of 1812. 25 v. (unbound). All saved. 

iVENS PAPERS. 1760-1850. About 250 y. Saved about 60 v., many in very 
good condition, others partly burned. 

Election Returns, 1777-1905. 10,000 papers, unbound. Fragments of 300 to 
400 papers saved. 

Rbnsselaebswyce Mss., 1634-1870. About 200 account books, 1000 Dutch let- 
ters, 8000 leases. 500 maps and surveys, and 25,000 miseellaneous papers. 
Saved nearly all the early Dutch account books, a court record, lV>±X-~>'2, 
the Letter book of Jeremias van Rensselaer, J 661-74, a few letters, and 

about 1000 lea- 
In addition lo the above-mentioned records there were saved the charter of 
the colony. 1664, the Duke's Laws, the Dongan laws, the Constitutions of the 
Stat.'. 1777. L821, 1846, L867 and L894, the Andre papers, the Washington relics, 
the collection of autographs of the Signers of the Declaration of Independence, 
the Dongan patent to the manor of Eensselaerswyck, and about 20 commissions 
from colonial governors to members of the Van Rensselaer family— all of which 

were not in the archives room, but in a safe in the room of the Commissioner 
of Education on the first floor of the Capitol, which was not exposed to the fire. 



Genealogies in Peepabation. — Persons of the several names are advised to 

furnish the compilers of these genealogies with records of their own families 



302 Recent Books [July 

and other information which they think may be useful. We would suggest that 
all facts of interest illustrating family history or character be communicated, 
especially service under theU. S. Government, the holding of other offices, grad- 
uation from college or professional schools, occupation, with places and dates 
of birth, marriage, residence, and death. All names should be given in full if 
possible. No initials should be used when the full name is known. \ 

Adams. — George, who died at Watertown, Mass., 10 Oct. 1696, by Mrs. George 
H. Atwood, South Haven, Van Buren Co., Mich. 

Atwood.— Harmon, who died at Boston, by Mrs. George H. Atwood, South 
Haven, Van Buren Co., Mich. 

Ave re II. — William, who died at Ipswich, Mass., in 1653, by Miss Clara A. 
Avery, 47 Eliot Street, Detroit, Mich. 

Drake.— Francis, born at Easton, Mass., 27 Eeb. 1750, by Albert H. Drake, 
98 Stannard Street, Providence, R. I. 

Hussey. — Richard of Dover, N. H., 1690, by Henry S. Webster, Gardiner, Me. 

Miles.— John, who died at Concord, Mass., 26 Aug. 1693, by Jonas M. Miles, 
Concord, Mass. {Corrected notice.) 

Munson. — Robert, born before 1700, who probably died at Scarboro, Me., by 
Albert C. Mason, Franklin, Mass. 



RECENT BOOKS 



[The editor particularly requests persons sending books for listing in the Register 
to state, for the information of readers, the price of each book, with the amount to be 
added for postage when sent by mail, and from whom it may be ordered. For the 
January issue, books should be received by Nov. 1 ; for April, by Feb. 1 ; for July, by 
May 1 ; and for October, by July l.J 

GENEALOGICAL 

Adam genealogy. Genealogie de la famille Adam. Par L'abbe G. A. Dejordy. 
Waterloo, Que., Imprimerie du Journal de Waterloo, 1910. 16 p. 24° 

Babcock and Main genealogies. Genealogical record of Nathaniel Babcock, Si- 
meon Main, Isaac Miner, Ezekiel Main. By Cyrus H. Brown, Westerly, R. I. 
Boston, The Everett Press, 1909. 362 p. pi. 8° Price $3.75. Address the au- 
thor. 

Barbour genealogy. Family history and genealogy of the Dryden Barbour 
family, Traer, Iowa. By Charles R. Green, Olathe, Kans. Olathe, Register 
Publishing Co., 1911. n. p. 8° 

Barnes and Cnrtiss genealogies. Ancestors and descendants of Capt. Benjamin 
Barnes and Charles Curtiss of Granville, Mass., 1636-1910. By Abel Tuttle 
Barnes. Sharon, Mass., 1911. viii-(-127 p. pi. 8° 

Bates genealogy. The Bates bulletin, vol. 4, no. 2, April 1911. 8 p. il. 8° 

Brady genealogy. Brady family reunion and fragments of Brady history and 
biography. By William G. Murdock, Milton, Pa., 1909. 124 p. fcsm. pi. 8° 

Casavant and Savenelle-Lalime genealogies. Genealogies des families Casavant 
et Ravenelle-Lalime. Par L'abbe G. A. Dejordy. Manchester, N. H., L' Avenir 
National, 1910. 27 p. 24° 

Castor genealogy. Castor family, Holmesburg branch. Printed from the 
records compiled from authentic sources. By Richard Allen Martin, 14th on 
the Castor chart, Fries' Building, Frankford, Pa., 1909. n.p. 8° 

Choquette genealogy, Genealogie de la famille Choquette. By L'abbe G. A. 
Dejordy. St. Hyacinthe, Imprimerie La Tribune, 1909. 31 p. 24° 

Colver-Culver genealogy. Descendants of Edward Colver of Boston, Dedham, 
and Roxbury, Massachusetts, and New London and Mystic, Connecticut. By 



1911] Recent Boohs 303 

Frederic Lathrop Colver. New York, Frank Allaben Genealogical Company 
[1910]. 271 p. 12°. Price: cloth $3.75; | mor. $6.50; full mor. $7.50; car- 
riage 15 cents. 

Felton genealogy. The first house on Felton Hill. By Daniel Henry Felton. 
With the fourteenth annual report of the Peabody Historical Society, 1900-1910. 
Incorporated August 15, 1896. 32 p. pi. 8° 

Harding genealogy. The Harding genealogy. By Alfred A. Doane, Everett, 
Mass. Reprinted from the Yarmouth Herald for October 25, 1910. 8 p. 8° 

Lindsay genealogy. The annual report of the Lindsay Family Association of 
America (inc.) for 1910. Edited by Margaret Lindsay Atkinson, p. 143-172. 
8° 

Porter genealogy. The descendants of Moses and Sarah Kilham Porter of 
Pawlet, Vt., with some notice of their ancestors and those of Timothy Hatch, 
Amy and Lucy Seymour Hatch, Mary Lawrence Porter and Lucretia Bushnell 
Porter. By John S. Lawrence, Grand Rapids, Mich. Grand Rapids, F. A. 
Onderdonk, printer, 1910. xiii-f-190 p. fcsm. pi. 8° 

Prefontaine genealogy. Genealogie de la famille Prefontaine. Par L' abb6 G. 
A. Dejordy. St. Hyacinthe, Imprimerie La Tribune, 1909. 20 p. 24° 

Reade genealogy. The Reade Record, no. 3, 1910. Reade Historical and Gene- 
alogical Association. 8 p. 8° 

Bussell genealogy. An account of some of the descendants of John Russell, 
the emigrant, from Ipswich, England, who came to Boston, New England, Oct. 
3, 1635. Together with some sketches of the allied families of Wadsworth, 
Tuttle, and Beresford. By the late Gurdon Wadsworth Russell, M.D., LL.D. 
Hartford, Conn., edited by Edwin Stanley Welles, 1910. 318 p. pi. 8° 

Sanford genealogy. Thomas Sanford, the emigrant to New England. An- 
cestry, life, and descendants. 1632-4. Sketches of four other pioneer Sanfords 
and some of their descendants in appendix, with many illustrations. By Carlton 
E. Sanford. Vols. 1 and 2. Rutland, Vt., The Tuttle Company, printers, c' 
1911. xiii+768; 769-1612 p. pi. 8° 

Senecal genealogy. Genealogie de la famille Senecal. Par L' abb6 G. A. 
Dejordy. St. Hyacinthe, L' Imprimerie Du Courrier, 1909. 22 p. 24° 

Warne genealogy. A genealogy of the Warne family in America. Principally 
the descendants of Thomas Warne, born 1652, died 1722, one of the twenty-four 
proprietors of East New Jersey. By Rev. George Warne Labaw, Pastor of the 
Reformed Church of Preakness, New Jersey. New York, Frank Allaben Gene- 
alogical Company [1911]. 701 p. pi. 8° Price $6.50. Address the author, 
R. F. D. 1, Paterson, N. J. 

Wendell genealogy. Ancestry and descendants of the late Isaac Wendell of 
Portsmouth, New Hampshire. [By Henry A. Wendell. Philadelphia, Pa., 
1911.] n.p. 4° Addenda, p. 250a-l. 4o 

New York Public Library, genealogies and local histories, British. New York Pub- 
lic Library. List of works relating to British genealogy and local history. New 
York, 1910. 366 p. 4° 

BIOGRAPHICAL 

Agassiz, Alexander, memoir. Alexander Agassiz, 1835-1910. By Alfred Golds- 
borough Mayer. Reprinted from the Popular Science Monthly for November, 
1910. p. 419-458, pi. 8° 

Ayer, Sarah Connell, diary. Diary of Sarah Connell Ayer, Andover and New- 
buryport, Massachusetts; Concord and Bow, New Hampshire; Portland and 
Eastport, Maine. Portland, Me., Lefavor-Tower.Company, 1910. 404 p. 8° 

Bacon, Jonathan, memoir. The old Jonathan Bacon farm, Walnut Hill. Con- 
tributed by Charles Edward Mann to Historical Collections of Natick. Natick, 
Mass., 1910. 39 p. pi. 8° 

Beall, Col. Ninian, memoir. Col. Ninian Beall. Born in Largo, Fifeshire, Scot- 
land, 1625, died in Prince George's County, Maryland, 1717. Historical address 

VOL. LXV. 21 



304 Recent Boohs [July 

on the occasion of the dedication of a memorial boulder to Colonel Ninian Beall. 
Delivered by Caleb Clarke Magruder, Jr., in St. John's Church, Georgetown, 
D. C, October 30, 1910. Printed under the auspices of the Society of Colonial 
Wars in the District of Columbia, January 2, 1911. 41+[2] p. pi. 8° 

Corey, Deloraine Pendre, memoir. Memoir of Deloraine Pendre Corey. By 
Charles Edward Mann. Boston, David Clapp & Son, 1911. 7 p. pi. 8° Reprint 
from Register for April 1911. 

Emerson, Rev. Joseph, diary. Diary kept by the Rev. Joseph Emerson of Pep- 
perell, Mass., August 1, 1748- April 9, 1749. With notes and an introduction by 
Samuel A. Green. Cambridge, John Wilson & Son, 1911. 23 p. 8° Reprinted 
from the Proceedings of the Massachusetts Historical Society for December, 
1910. 

Holworthy, Sir Matthew and Lady, memoir. Sir Matthew and Lady Holworthy. 
By Albert Matthews. Reprinted from the Publications of The Colonial Society 
of Massachusetts, vol. XIII. Cambridge, John Wilson & Son, 1911. p. 153- 

180, pi. 8o 

Hyatt, Alpheus, memoir. Alpheus Hyatt, 1838-1902. By Dr. Alfred Golds- 
borough Mayer. Reprinted from the Popular Science Monthly for February, 
1911. p. 129-146, il. 8° 

Johnson, Eev. Jacob, M.A., biography. Rev. Jacob Johnson, M.A. Pioneer 
preacher of Wyoming Valley (Wilkes-Barre, Pa.), 1772-1790. First settled pas- 
tor, First Presbyterian Church, Wilkes-Barre, Pa. By Frederick C. Johnson, 
M.D. Reprinted from vol. XI of the Proceedings of the Wyoming Historical 
and Genealogical Society. Wilkes-Barre Record Print, 1911. 100 p. pi. 8° 

Paine, Thomas, centennial celebration. Thomas Paine, centennial celebration. 
New Rochelle, June 5, 1909. 30 p. il. 8° 

Paine, Thomas, memoir. Thomas Paine, the patriot. An address by J. Outram 
Sherman. Delivered before the Huguenot Society of New Rochelle, N. Y., at 
the opening of the Paine House, July 14, 1910. Special Library edition printed 
for the Thomas Paine National Historical Society, 120 Lexington Ave., New 
York City. 24 p. il. 8° Price 20 cents. 

Paine, Thomas, monument to. Thomas Paine Memorial. Rededication of the 
Paine monument and assignment of its custody to the City of New Rochelle. 
1737-1809. Thomas Paine, A.M. A record of the exercises and report of the 
speeches delivered at the monument, October 14th 1905. 30 p. il. 8° 

Walker, James M., memoir. In memoriam James M. Walker. 62 p. pi. 8° 

Woodbury, John Paige, memoir. A sketch of John Paige Woodbury with his 
genealogy from John Woodbury. By C. J. H. Woodbury, A.M., Sc.D. Re- 
printed from the Register of the Lynn Historical Society for 1910. Lynn, Mass., 
Frank S. Whitten, printer, 1911. 10 p. 8° 

Harvard University, Class of 1870. Harvard College. Class of 1870. Secre- 
tory's report. Number IX, 1910. Cambridge, Riverside Press, 1911. 89 p. 8° 

Yale University, Class of 1904. Sexennial record of the Class of 1904, Yale 
College. Edited by G. Elton Parks, Class Secretary. Published for the Class 
Secretaries Bureau by the Yale University Press, 1911. 387 p. pi. 8° 

Yale University, Class of 1909. History of the Class of 1909, Yale College. 
Edited by Harold Phelps Stokes, class secretary, W. W. Borden, and E. O. 
Proctor. Vol. 1. New Haven, Conn., Yale University, 1909. 413 p. il. 8° 

Yale University, Sheffield Scientific School. Biographical record. Classes from 
1868-1872 of the Sheffield Scientific School. Published by the Class Secretaries 
Bureau, Yale University, 1910. 254 p. 12° 

HISTORICAL 
(a) General 

Alabama claims. Reminiscences of the Geneva tribunal of arbitration 1872. 
The Alabama claims. By Frank Warren Hackett. Boston and New York, 
Houghton Mifflin Company, 1911. xvi-f-450 p. 8° Price $2 net. 



1911] Recent Books 305 

Beaumarchais and the American Revolution. By Blanche Evans Hazard. A prize 
essay published by the General Society of the Daughters of the Kevolution. 
Boston, Mass., Edwin L. Slocomb, printer, 1910. 39 p. 8° 

Chile, conquerors. Los Conquistadores de Chile. Por Tomas Thayer Ojeda. 
Torao Segundo. Publicado en los Anales de la Universidad, tomas CXXV i 
CXXVI. Santiago de Chile, Imprenta Cervantes, 1910. 265 p. 8° 

England, taxation in. Williams College. David A. Wells prize essays. No. 2. 
The history of parliamentary taxation in England. Printed for the department 
of political science of Williams College. New York, Moffat, Yard & Co., 1911. 
xvii+317p. 8° 

Magazine of History, extra number 14. The American tars in Tripolitan slavery, 
containing an account of the loss and capture of the United States frigate Phila- 
delphia ; treatment and sufferings of the prisoners ; description of the place ; 
manners, customs, &c, of the Tripolitans; public transactions of the United 
States with that regency, including Gen. Eaton's expedition, interspersed with 
interesting remarks, anecdotes, and poetry, on various subjects. Written dur- 
ing upwards of nineteen months' imprisonment vassalage among the Turks. By 
William Kay. Troy. Printed by Oliver Lyon for the author, 1808. New York, 
reprinted by William Abbatt, 1911. 295 p. 4° 

Maine, Church and State, history. Bowdoin College Studies in History. No. 1. 
Early days of church and state in Maine. By Robert Hale. Brunswick, Me., 
published by the College, 1910. 52 p. 8° 

Massachusetts, single tax. Taxation of land values in Massachusetts. By 
Jonas M. Miles. Boston, Thomas Todd Co., 1910. 24 p. 8° 

Nebraska, history. Outline of Nebraska history. By Albert Watkins. A 
special publication. Lincoln, Nebr., State Historical Society, 1910. 45 p. 8° 

New England soldiers. Bibliography of lists of New England soldiers. By 
Mary Ellen Baker, A.B. Boston, New England Historic Genealogical Society, 
1911. 56 p. 8° Reprinted from the Register, 1910 and 1911. 

New York. Province of, history. Minutes of the executive council of the Province 
of New York. Administration of Erancis Lovelace 16G8-1673, vol. 2. Colla- 
teral and illustrative documents XX-XCVIII. Edited by Victor Hugo Paltsits, 
State Historian. Albany, published by the State of New York, 1910. p. xii-|- 
387-806 pi. fcsm. map 4° 

Virginia, history. Ye kingdome of Accawmacke or the eastern shore of Vir- 
ginia in the 17th century. By Jennings Cropper Wise. Richmond, Va., The 
Bell Book and Stationery Co., 1911. x+406 p. 8° Price $2 net; by mail $2.15. 
Address the publisher. 

(6) Local 

Groton, Mass., Community. The Community, Groton, Mass. The story of a 
neighborhood. By Edward Adams Richardson. Ayer, Mass., 1911. 15 p. pi. 8° 

Hopewell, N. J., epitaphs. Inscriptions in the first u Old Cohansey" burying 
ground, Hopewell, Cumberland Co., N. J., with a historical sketch. By Frank 
D. Andrews. Vineland, N. J., 1911. 17 p. 8° 

Marietta, Ohio, St. Luke's Church. Paragraphs, portraits, and pictures, supple- 
mentary to the history of St. Luke's church, Marietta, Ohio. By Wilson Waters, 
A.M., 1911. 48 p. pi. 8° 

Skowhegan (Old Canaan), Me., history. Old Canaan during the Revolution. By 
Lillian Clayton Smith. Grandmother's Grandmother [Poem]. By Louise Helen 
Coburn [1910]. n.p. 8° 

Stow, Mass., vital records. Vital records of Stow, Mass., to the year 1850. Bos- 
ton, Mass., published by the New England Historic Genealogical Society at the 
charge of the Eddy Town-Record Fund, 1911. 270 p. 8° 

Ticonderoga, N.Y., history. A memorial tablet at Ticonderoga. A corporation's 
gift to history. Reprinted by the Ticonderoga Pulp and Paper Co., by permis- 
sion of Ticonderoga Historical Society [1910]. 29 p. il. 8° 



306 Recent Books [July 

Worthington, Mass., vital records. Vital records of Worthington, Mass., to the 
year 1850. Boston, Mass., published by the New England Historic Genealogical 
Society at the charge of the Eddy Town-Record Fund, 1911. 159 p. 8° 

SOCIETIES 

The Bostonian Society Publications, Vol. 7. Boston, Old State House, 1910. 
147 p. pi. 8° 

Maiden Historical Society. The Register of the Maiden Historical Society. 
Maiden, Massachusetts. Number 1, 1910-11. Edited by the Committee on Pub- 
lication. Bell Rock Memorial. Lynn, Mass., Frank S. Whitten, printer, 1910. 
113 p. pi. 8° 

Massachusetts, Colonial Society of. Publications of the Colonial Society of Mas- 
sachusetts. Vol. XII. Transactions, 1908-1909. Printed at the charge of the 
Robert Charles Billings Fund. Boston, published by the Society, 1911. xiv-r- 
458 p. pi. fcsm. 8° 

New England Society in the City of New York. 105th anniversary celebration of 
the New England Society in the City of New York at the Waldorf-Astoria, De- 
cember 22, 1910. 126 p. 4o 

New Jersey Society of the Sons of the American Revolution. Year-book, 1910. 
Newark, N. J., published by the Society [1911]. 270 p. pi. 8° 

Society for the Preservation of New England Antiquities. Bulletin. Vol. I, no. 2. 
Boston, February, 1911. 8 p. il. 8° 

Swedish Historical Society of America. Year-book. Arsbok utgifven af Sven- 
ska Historiska Sallskapet i Amerika. Vol. Ill, 1909-1910. Chicago, 111., 1910. 
136 p. 8« 

MISCELLANEOUS 

Massachusetts, record commissioner. Twenty-third report on the custody and 
condition of the public records of parishes, towns, and counties for 1910. By 
Henry E. Woods, commissioner. Boston, Wright & Potter Printing Co., 1911. 
7 p. 8° 

Pirates. Pirates off the Florida coast and elsewhere. By S. A. Green. Cam- 
bridge, John Wilson & Son, 1911. 9 p. 8° Reprinted from the Proceedings of 
the Massachusetts Historical Society for February, 1911. 

Sacrament Certificate, 1673. A sacrament certificate, 1673. Reprinted from the 
Publications of The Colonial Society of Massachusetts, vol. XIII. Cambridge, 
John Wilson & Son, 1910. p. 119-126 fcsm. 8° 



ERRATA 



Vol. 65, p. 175, 1. 27, for 1486 read 1476. 

Vol. 65, p. 192, 1. 15, for John read Jonas M. 

Vol. 65, p. 193, 1. 39, for Park Vale read William E. Gould, 15 Park Vale, Brookline, 

Mass. 
Vol. 65, p. 193, 1. 40, for 5 cents read 50 cents. 
Vol. 65, p. 196, 1. 7, for Wayland read Sudbury. 
Vol. 65, p. 199, 1. 26', for 450 read 932. 
Vol. 65, p. 204, 1. 15, for Moreland read Morland. 
Vol. 65, p. xxi, 1. 18, for Laurence read Lauramau. 
Vol. 65, p. xlv, 1. 23,*/or 1842 read 1849. 
Vol. 65, p. xlv, 1. 45, for Harvey read Harry. 
Vol. 65, p. xlv, 1. 48, for 1894 read 1869. 











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THE 
NEW ENGLAND 

HISTORICAL AND GENEALOGICAL 

REGISTER 



OCTOBER, 19 LI 



WILLIAM CARVER BATES 

By Charles Sidney Ensign, LL.B., of Newton, Mass. 

William Carver 7 Bates was born in Hanover, Mass., May 25, 
1838, and died in Newton, November 6, 1910. His father was 
Rufus, 6 who married Huldah Keith. The paternal line is Gamaliel, 6 
Clement, 4 Joseph, 3 James, 2 and Clement 1 Bate of Hingham, 1635, 
descended from John Bate of Lydd, co. Kent, England, who died 
there in 1522, and also from Robert Carver of Marshfield, 1638. 

His maternal ancestry was from Experience Mitchell of Plymouth, 
1623, and Bridgewater, and Rev. James Keith, who came in 1660 
and in 1665 was the first minister settled in Bridgewater, and Col. 
Edward and Major Thomas Mitchell. Experience Mitchell came 
to Plymouth in the Anne in 1623, and was undoubtedly the son 
of Thomas, an original member of the Separatist Church in London, 
which removed to Amsterdam and settled there before the Pilgrims 
went to Holland. This Thomas Mitchell was born about 1566. 

His first wife, Maria , died before May 9, 1606, and he then 

married Margaret (Williams) Dickens at Amsterdam, May 9, 1606. 
She was the widow of Christopher Dickens, also a member of the 
London Separatist Church, and who also went to Amsterdam. 
Various searchers of the Amsterdam records have read this name 
Digchin, Diggins, Thickens, Uochin, Urchin.* Mr. Bates was also 
(descended from Richard Warren, Francis Cook, and Gov. William 
•Bradford, who came in the Mat/flower in 1620. 

He was educated in the district school of Hanover, and at the age 
of twelve entered its academy, where lie remained until the autumn 
of 1854. Fond of biography, history, and travels, and a keen ob- 
server, he was regarded in after life as a well educated man. 

His business life commenced in the store and family of John C. 
Calif of Gloucester, where he remained two years. On January 1, 
1857, he became a clerk in the dry goods house of Houghton, 
Sawyer & Company of Boston. 

•See Dexter's "English Exiles in Amsterdam" in 2 Proceedings Massachusetts 
Hist. Soc, vol. 6, pp. 41-64; Dexter's England and Holland of the Pilgrims; Dexter's 
Congregationalism as seen in its Literature; and Russell's Pilgrim Memorials, 1860, 

pp. 223^324. 

VOL. LXV. 22 



308 William Carver Bates [Oct. 

At the beginning of the Civil War he enlisted, April 9, 1861, hi| 
Co. G from Concord of the Fifth Regiment, M. V. M., under 
Capt. George II. Prescott. Captured in the first battle of Bull Run, 
July 26, 1861, he was confined in the prisons of Libby and Rich- 
mond, Va., for two months, New Orleans, La., four months, an 
Salisbury, N. C, four months — in all ten months. 

Retiring from service, he married in Hanover, April 14, 1863, 
his schoolmate Emma Barstow, of good ancestry, born in Scituate 
June 15, 1837. Their children were three boys, named Rufus 
Carver, William Haviland, and Wilfred Barstow, and three girls, 
of whom the last survive, and are actively engaged in educational 
work in New York City. 

Soon after his marriage Mr. Bates became a member of the firm 
of Holmes, Bates and Nichols, commission merchants in Boston, 
who transacted a large business in the British Provinces, the West 
Indies, and South America. During his mercantile career he trav- 
elled in the British North American Provinces, the British West 
Indies, the northern coast of South America, British Guiana, Vene- 
zuela, Honduras, the Bahamas, and Bermuda. 

Having retired from mercantile business, after serving as com- 
missioner at the New Orleans Exposition in 1884, he entered into 
the service of the Mutual Life Insurance Company of New York, 
in which he remained until his death. 

In 1866 the family removed to Newton, and became identified 
with its civic and church life. Connected with Grace Episcopal 
Church, he faithfully served its corporation and church in various 
capacities, and at his death was the oldest member of the corpora- 
tion, having been elected April 13, 1868. 

Mr. Bates was very active in the erection in 1876 of the Eliot 
Terrace at Nonantum (Newton), in commemoration of the locality 
where John Eliot preached the gospel to Waban and his tribe of 
Indians, October 28, 1646, and the founding and donation to the 
city of the "Eliot Fund" of three hundred dollars, the income from 
which is expended annually in prize essays on historical subjects 
written by pupils of the Newton public schools. He was elected a 
member of the Newton Common Council in 1889 and 1890. At 
the celebration of Neivton's Centennial, June 17, 1876, he presented 
a portrait of Col. Joseph Ward of Revolutionary fame to the city 
with an historical address. 

He was connected with many clubs, societies, and associations of 
prominence, among which were The Young Men's Christian Union 
(life member) ; Boston Mycological Club (charter member and vice- 
president) ; Boston Chess Club (a director) ; Charles Ward Post, 
No. 62, G. A. R., Newton; Massachusetts Association of the 
Prisoners of War ; Hunniwell Club, Newton ; Tuesday Club, New- 
ton, before which he read some seventy-three papers; Newton 
Natural History Society (charter member and treasurer) ; and the 
old Bridgewater Historical Society (life member) . 



1911] William Carver Bates 309 

Mr. Bates was frequently called upon for lectures and addresses 
before private and public organizations, among which was that at 
the Hanover Academy in 1858 on "The Outer and Inner Life"; 
'Return from Rebel Prisons," in 1863, in Hanover, Gloucester, and 
Abington ; the historical address at the 1 50th anniversary of Hano- 
ver and dedication of the soldiers' monument, in 1876 ; Memorial 
Day address in Newton in 1876, and in Hanover in 1908 ; the pre- 
sentation of the Eliot Memorial in 1876 ; the dedication of the 
Hanover Free Public Library in 1907, for which he had provided 
the Hanover Alumni Fund ; the anniversary of the Boston Chess 
Club in 1907 ; and the Bostonian Society. 

He edited a unique volume named f Stars and Stripes in Rebel- 
dom," consisting of compositions read at their meetings by his 
fellow-prisoners, and which upon his release were brought away 
under the cover of a canteen. Also the following monographs : 
r Rambles in the Tropics," "Venezuela and British Guiana," "Creole 
Folk-Lore," and " Mushrooms " ; and memorials upon Col. Joseph 
Ward, 1737-1812, Gen. Adin Ballou Underwood, Benjamin Bars- 
tow Torrey, 1906, and Col. Francis Jewett Parker, 1909. 

Mr. Bates became a member of the New England Historic Gene- 
alogical Society December 7, 1870, and continued such until De- 
cember 31, 1885, but was elected a life member at the annual 
meeting in 1897. During his membership he had read papers at 
the Society's meetings, been a contributor to the Register, and had 
prepared numerous memoirs. He was a member of the Committee 
on Papers and Essays from 1877 to 1885, inclusive, and from 1906 
until his death, was elected a member of the Council for 1910-1911, 
and had rendered valuable services in bringing the Society more 
prominently before the public since its meetings in Pilgrim Hall. 
He served on various committees, including the special committees 
upon f The question of the circumstances attending the formation 
and execution of the plan of what is known as the Boston Tea 
Party," and "The location of the scion of the Old Elm" on Boston 
Common ; also as historiograper pro tempore. As Chairman of the 
Committee on the Sale of Publications, in 1910, he rendered valu- 
able services. Mr. Bates, accidentally finding some valuable papers 
belonging to the late Daniel Webster, delivered an address upon 
them before the Society in May, 1896, and in 1897 presented it 
with one of them. Among them was a copy of an answer to a re- 
quest that Mr. Webster undertake a lawsuit upon a contingent fee. 
!f I do not desire employment in professional matters although I do 
sometimes en^a^e in them. But I never en^ai^e in contingencies 
merely, for that would make me a mere party to a lawsuit. — D. W." 
Mr. Bates died, having spent a useful and fruitful life, leaving his 
widow and three daughters, Abby Barstow, Elizabeth Carver, and 
Sarah Loveland Bates, and the final tribute was paid him in the 
church he loved before a representative body. 



310 Descendants of Deacon John Dam [Oct. 

The Society feels that it has lost in Mr. Bates an enthusiastic and 
useful supporter, for he was ready with practical suggestions, apt in 
Committee work, and never accepted failure. 



SOME DESCENDANTS OF DEACON JOHN DAM 

OF DOVER, N. H., 1633 

Edited by John Scales, A.M., of Dover, N. H. 
[Concluded from page 219] 

29. Caleb 6 Dame {Jabez 5 Richard* John, 3 John, 2 John 1 ), born in 1772, 

died 29 May 1864. He married twice: first Abigail Guppey of 
Dover, and secondly Tammy Twombly of Rochester. He lived 
at Rochester. 

Children bv first wife : 

i. Jabez, 7 b 1799; d. 6 June 1863; m. Elizabeth Bickford. Chil- 
dren: 1. Seth. 8 2. Frank 0., m. Mary Herrick, dau. of Joshua, 
M. C. from Maine. 

ii. Anna, b. 1800; d. 20 Jan. 1855; m. 9 Dec. 1827, John Guppey of 
Dover. Children: 1. Albert. 2. Bussell. 3. George Fox. 

iii. Meribah, b. 1802 ; d. 11 Apr. 1891 ; m. Henry Hall. Child : Harry. 

iv. James, b. 180-1; d. unm. ; lived at Rochester; soldier in the Civil 
War, Co. A, 4th N. H. V. 

v. Sophia, b. 1806; d. 1896 ; m. John Haskins of Boston. 

vi. Mary, b. 21 Feb. 1808; d. 29 Mar. 1883; m. Thomas Heald. Chil- 
dren: 1. Mary Phylura. 2. Louise Peabody. 3. Charles Thomas. 
40. vii. John Wesley, b. 26 Mar. 1813. 

Children by second wife : 

viii. Charles Wesley, b. 1816; d. unm. at Fort Worth, Tex., 15 July 

1893 ; editor and publisher of a newspaper. 
ix. Martin Luther, d. unm. 
x. Amasa, b. 1818; m. Lydia Jenness. Children: 1. Taylor. 8 2. 

Lizzie. 3. Emma. 
xi. Levi, b. 22 Oct. 1820; d. 18 July 1880; m. Olive L. Garland. 

Child: Ilattie. 8 

30. Charity 6 Dame (Jabez, 5 Richard* John 3 John,' 1 John 1 ), born 1 Sept. 

1775, died 3 Feb. 1833. She married, 4 Mar. 1798, Joseph Han- 
son of Rochester. 
Children : 

i. Humphrey Hanson, 7 b. 1799. 

ii. Mary Dame Hanson, b. 1800; d. 1859; m. Dr. J. C. FARRixGTONof 

Rochester, one of the leading physicians of Stratford County, and 

Member of Congress. Children: 1. Dr. James B. 2. Mary. 3. 

Joseph. 4. Walter. 
iii. Hannah Hanson, b. 1801 ; d. in infancy, 
iv. Joseph Hanson, b. 27 July 1803; d. unm. 21 Apr. 1828. 
v. Meribah Hanson, b. 1805; d. 18 Nov. 1863; in. Dr. Joseph Smith, 

a prominent physician of Dover, who d. 25 Feb. 1886, aged 88 yrs. 

Children: 1. Arabella. 2. Charles Carroll, M.D. 3. Elizabeth. 

4. Herman M.D. 
vi. Joanna Hanson, b. 1807; d. 10 Oct. 1884; m. 21 June 1829, John 

McDuffee of Rochester, the leading banker of Strafford County 

for half a century, who d. 7 Dec. 1890, aged 87 yrs. 



1911] Descendants of Deacon John Dam 311 

vii. Hester Hanson, b. 1810; m. Daniel Mooney. 

vUi. Dominicus Hanson, b. 13 Aug. 1813; d. July 1909; m. 19 Sept. 

1839, Betsey Chase; a merchant, and in active business. Child : 

Charles A. G. 
ix. Asa P. Hanson, b. 1815 ; m. Anna Kimball; lived at Dover. 

31. Jabez 6 Dame (Jabez 6 Richard* John, 3 John, 2 John 1 ), born at Ro- 

chester in 1782, died 26 Jan. 1850. He married, 8 Dec. 1811, 
Elizabeth Hanson Cushing, daughter of Peter and Hannah 
(Hanson), and granddaughter of Rev. Jonathan Cushing, who was 
pastor of the First Church in Dover, 17 17-1 7 G7. Jabez, who was 
a merchant, farmer, and leading citizen of Rochester, lived on the 
ancestral Dame farm on Haven Hill. 
Children : 

41. i. Permelia Cushing, 7 b. 21 Apr. 1814. 
ii. Charles, b. 1817; d. in infancy. 

32. James Chadbourne 7 Dame (Joseph* Joseph* John* John* John* 

John 1 ), born at Barnstead 25 Aug. 1770, died at Concord 10 Oct. 
1859. He married, 11 Jan. 1795, Phebe Ayers, born 12 Feb. 
1772, died 30 Oct. 1854. . He was a noted schoolmaster, and lived 
at Barnstead, where he farmed. 
Children : 

i. Joseph, 8 b. 23 Jan. 1796; d. 1884; m. 9 Nov. 1820, Ursula Hall. 

ii. John, b. 2 Mar. 1799 ; m. Anna Drew. 

iii. Eliza, b. 16 July 1802 ; d. 5 Sept. 1849 ; m. William Nutter. 

iv. George, b. 23 June 1809; d. unm. 1873. 

v. Mary, b. 26 Aug. 1810; m. William Shackford. 

vi. Patience Harriet, b. 5 Jan. 1815; d. 24 Apr. 1900; a successful 
teacher ; as a nurse in the Civil War she served continuously with 
the 2d Regt. N. H. V. from Apr. 1861 to Apr. 1865; received the 
thanks of the N. H. General Court and .$500 ; one of the founders 
of the Soldiers' Home at Tilton, N. H. ; clerk in the Treasury 
Department at Washington until 78 yrs. old; d. aged 85. 

33. Joseph 7 Dame (Joseph, 6 Joseph, 6 John* John* John, 2 John 1 ), born 20 

Nov. 1772, died 27 Mar. 1861. He married Anna Plummer, and 

lived at Dover ; a farmer. 

Children : 

i. Samuel," b. 12 May 1802. 

ii. John, b. 28 May 1803. 

iii. Lydia, b. 14 Feb. 1805. 

iv. Daniex, b. 17 May 1807. 

v. Mary, b. 28 Sept. 1808. 

vi. Charles, b. 12 Sept. 1810; d. unm.; a graduate of Bowdoin Col- 

lege, L835, and Andover Theological Seminary, 1838 ; was ordained 

2!) .May 1839; pastor of the Congregational Church at Falmouth, 

Me., and elsewhere. 
vii. Franklin, b. 9 Nov. 1812. 
viii. Elizabeth, b. 9 Apr. 1814; d. 10 Sept. 1878. 
ix. IiiiiiiMi. I). 12 Nov. 1816; d. 12 Aug. 1842. 
x. MEHTTABLE, 1). 23 Sept. 1818; d. 3 Nov. 1842. 
xi. Sarah, b. 1820. 
xii. JOSEPH, b. 1823; d. 26 May 1885; soldier in the 11th N. H. V., Civil 

War. 
xiii. William (twin), b. 7 Sept. 1827; d. 8 July 1887. 
xiv. Susan (twin), b. 7 Sept. 1827; d. 20 Jan. 1889. 

34. Hunkinc Dame (Hunkingf Moses/' John* John,* John 2 Joh/S), born 

at Lee 1G May 178G, died at Nottingham 1G Feb. 18.32. JI<- mar- 



o 



12 Descendants of Deacon John Dam [Oct. 

ried, in 1810, Lydia C. Durgin, born 6 Mar. 1790, died 6 Mar. 
1847, daughter of Josiah of Lee. He lived on the turnpike at Not- 
tingham ; a tavern keeper and farmer. 
Children : 

i. Israel Hunking, 8 b. 29 Mar. 1811; d. 4 Feb. 1868; m. Emily A. 

Tuttle. Children: 1. Henrietta. 2. Lydia. 
ii. Samuel Scales, b. 1816 ; d. 1870 ; m. (1) Hannah Dame, dau. of 

John 7 (36, vi) ; m. (2) Harriet Dame, also dau. of John 7 (36, iii) ; 

lived at Nottingham ; a farmer and merchant, 
iii. Greenleaf, b. 19 July 1820 ; d. 19 July 1850 ; m. Charlot Chiswell. 
iv. Joseph, b. 29 Apr. 1824; d. 19 Apr. 1871; m. Mary Crawford, 

b. 30 Apr. 1828, d. 20 Apr. 1868 ; lived at Nottingham, 
v. Lydia A., b. 18 Nov. 1828 ; d. 14 Sept. 1859 ; m. John K. Steel. 

35. Israel 7 Dame (Hunking* Moses, 5 John, 4 John, 3 John, 2 John 1 ), born 

26 Aug. 1788, died 3 Apr. 1872. He married Hannah Durgin, 
born 3 May 1794, daughter of Josiah of Lee. He was a farmer 
and mill owner, and lived at Lee. 
Children : 

i. Sallie, 8 b. 21 Mar. 1811 ; d. 28 Feb. 1860; m. William Locke. 
ii. Hannah, b. 5 Nov. 1814. 
iii. Greenleaf Cllley, b. 16 Apr. 1816. 
iv. Nancy, b. 8 Mar. 1819 ; m. Samuel Glass. 
v. Clarissa, b. 5 Apr. 1821 ; d. unm. 20 June 1878. 
vi. Lydia, b. 20 Oct. 1823 ; d. 4 Mar. 1830. 
vii. Abby H., b. 3 Mar. 1826; m. Harvey Young. 

viii. Israel Samuel, b. 28 Apr. 1830 ; d. 22 Mar. 1893 ; m. 1858, Mary 
Hanson of Dover ; farmer; lived at Lee. 

36. John 7 Dame (Samuel, 6 Moses, 5 John 4 John, 3 John, 2 John 1 ), born at 

Nottingham 21 Apr. 1781, died 11 Mar. 1856. He married Nancy 
Parsons Barber of Epping, and lived at Nottingham. 
Children : 

i. Daniel Barber, 8 b. 17 Feb. 1810;. d. 30 Oct. 1846; m. Betsey Mc- 

Kendly. 
42. ii. Samuel, b. 1 June 1812. 

iii. Harriet, b. 10 May 1814; m. Samuel Scales 8 Dame (34, ii). 

iv. Kobert Barber, b. 26 Aug. 1817 ; d. 26 July 1906 ; m. 1844, Harriet 

Hill ; lived at Epping ; brick mason, 
v. John, b. 27 Nov. 1821 ; m. Sarah Manning. 
vi. Hannah, b. 15 Apr. 1823; d. 7 Mar. 1845; m. Samuel Scales 8 

Dame (35. ii). Children: 1. Frank H. 9 2. Hannah B. 

37. Jonathan 7 Dame ( Richard, 6 Jonathan, 5 Richard, 4 Johm 3 John, 2 

John 1 ), b. on 20 Apr. 1786, died 30 Nov. 1865. He married, 9 

Nov. 1828, Hannah O. May. He lived at Dover, where he was 

cashier of the bank, and in 1844 removed to Newport and was 

cashier of a bank there for many years. 

Children : 

i. Richard, 8 b. 12 July 1829 ; d. unm. 12 Dec. 1849. 

ii. William, b. 18 Jan. 1831 ; d. 1855. 

iii. Owen, b. 21 Feb. 1833. 

iv. Elma Maria, b. 23 July 1835. 

v. Elizabeth, b. 27 Feb. 1838. 

vi. Mary, b. 19 Nov. 1842. 

38. Mary 7 Dame (Timothy 6 Jabez, 5 Richard, 4 John 3 John, 2 John 1 ), 

born at Rochester 2 June 1805, married, 1823, Jonathan Weeks, 
born at Dover 8 Jan. 1804. 



1911] Descendants of Deacon John Dam 313 

Children : 

i. George Locke Weeks, b. 19 June 1825 ; m. Rebecca Page. 

ii. Rufus Spaulding Weeks, b. 14 Sept. 1829 ; d. 1858. 

iii. John Wesley Weeks, b. 24 July 1832; d. 1856. 

iv. Jonathan Weeks, b. at Lowell, Mass., 7 Aug. 1835; d. 1835. 

v. Orrin Francis Weeks, b. 30 Sept. 1837; d. 1842. 

vi. Joseph Dame Weeks, b. 3 Dec. 1840; d. at Pittsburgh, Pa., 26 
Dec. 1898; m. Martha J. Fowler; lived at Pittsburgh. 

vii. Edward Francis Weeks, b. 4 Nov. 1842; d. 1861. 

viii. Mary Ella Weeks, b. at Lowell 14 Apr. 1849; d. at Cambridge, 
Mass., 6 Sept. 1906; m. 22 Dec. 1897, Albert H. Lamson of El- 
kins, N. H. ; no children. 

39. Asa Sekver 7 Dame ( Timothy* Jabez, 5 Richard,* John* John, 2 John 1 ), 

born 8 Feb. 1818, married twice : first Anna Nutter, and sec- 
ondly Arabella Buzzell. 
Children, by second wife : 

i. Franklin P., 8 m. Sarah Parsons Dixon. Children: 1. Bessie,* m. 
Eskar Peavy, 2. John. 3. Alice, m. Seba Smart. 4. Arthur, m. 
Edith Battey. 

ii. Alonzo. 

iii. Sarah Frances, m. Allen Hall. Children: 1. Ossie M. 2. Ar- 
thur E. 

40. John Wesley 7 Dame {Caleb* Jabez, 5 Richard,* John, 8 John, 2 John 1 ), 

born 26 Mar. 1813, died 13 Mar. 1879. He married Caroline 
Lord, who died 9 Nov. 1860. He lived at Rochester, where he was 
a farmer. 
Children : 

i. Charles Wesley 8 , b. 22 Jan. 1841 ; m. 22 Jan. 1868, Emily H. Per- 
kins; lives on Haven Hill, Rochester; a soldier in the 26th Regt. 
Mass. Vols., 1861-65. Children: 1. Fannie A. 9 2. Ernest J. 
3. Carrie M. 4. Lura. 5. Josie. 6. Blanche. 

ii. Augusta J., b. 20 Nov. 1842; m. Martin V. B. Wentworth; lives 
at Rochester; no children. 

iii. Sophia H., b. 25 Apr. 1845; m. John Blaisdell; lives at East 
Rochester. Children: I. Herman W. 2. Osmond. 3. B. Frank. 

iv. Osmond, b. 23 Dec. 1847 : d. 1848. 

v. Clara A., b. 10 Mar. 1850; d. 1853. 

vi. George E., b. Oct. 1851; m. Mrs. Bettie McClellan; lives in 
Florida. Children: 1. Carrie. 9 2. Hattie. 3. Bessie. 

vii. Jennie, b. 13 Nov. 1854; m. Albert H. Wentworth; lived at 
Rochester. Child : Moscoe, m. Bessie Whitney of Portland, Me. 

41. Permelia Cusiiino 7 Dame (Jabez, 6 Jabez, 5 Richard, 4 John, 8 John, 2 

John 1 ), born 21 Apr. 1814, died 2 May 1854. She married, 14 Feb. 
1842, Stephen Perkins Estes, born at Sanford, Me., 1810, died 
at Rochester 12 Jan. 1854, son of Samuel and Rhoda (Linscott). 
They lived at Rochester with her father on the Dame farm on 
Haven Hill. 
Children : 

i. Elizabeth Gushing Estes, b. 10 July 1843; d. unm. 8 Feb. 1900. 

ii. Mary Millard Estes, b. 23 Dec 1840; d. unm. 16 July 1800. She 
and her sister Elizabeth dishing were left orphans in 1854, when 
they were placed under guardians and resided at Rochester village 
until 1804, when they removed to Dover and resided there until 
their death. Soon after coming to Dover they commenced collect- 
ing the material which constitutes the larger part of this genealogy. 
It was a labor of love with them, and they spent much time and 
money in their researches. At the death of the elder sister in 



314 Genealogical Research in England [Oct. 

1909, by order of her will, the Dame memoranda passed to the 
hands of Mr. John Scales of Dover, for editing and publication. 
Mr. Scales secured quite an additional number of families, names, 
and dates, which combined with the other part constitute the en- 
tire work. 

42. Samuel 8 Dame (John, 1 Samuel* Moses, 5 John, 4 John, 3 John, 2 John 1 ), 
born at Nottingham, N. H., 1 June 1812, died there 16 Nov. 1881. 
He married, 1836, Mary Ann Gilman of Newmarket, born 7 June 
1814. He lived at Nottingham, and was a farmer and active busi- 
ness man. 
Child : 

i. Loren L., 9 b. 11 Mar. 1838 ; d. at Medford, Mass., 1903 ; m. Nancy 
Isabel Arnold of Braintree, Mass., for many years a high school 
principal, the closing years of his labors being at Medford; three 
daughters. 



GENEALOGICAL RESEARCH IN ENGLAND 

Transcribed by Miss Elizabeth French, and communicated by the Committee on 

English Research 

[Continued from page 291] 

Hinckley Entries in the Parish Registers and Bishop's 
Transcripts of Harrietsham, 1 538-1 638* 

1539 Anne daughter of John Hinckeley, bapt. 8 October. 

1553 John Hinckley and Johane Bills of this parish married 9 October. 

1557 A daughter of John Hinckley Jun. bapt. [no month or day, but be- 
tween the feast of All Saints, 1 November, and the Feast of the 
Purification, 7 February.] 

1559 Margaret daughter of John Hinckely bapt. 28 February [1559-60]. 

1562 Henry son of John Hinckeley, bapt. 21 June. 

1562 Thomas son of Robart Hinkley bapt. 28 December. 

1563 Johan Hinckleye buried 23 January [1563-4]. 

1564 Diamina [Amina in B. T.] daughter of John Hinkelye bapt. 12 

November. 
1570 John Hyncle and Aves Eles married 3 July. 

1570 Clemen daughter of Robert Hinckley bapt. 27 . 

1571 Isaac Hincklie bapt. 8 October. 

1571 Agnes Hincklie bapt. 1 January [1571-2]. 

1574 Elizabeth wife of Robert Hincklie buried 2 November. 

1574 Robert Hincklie and Katherina Leese, widow, married 10 February 

[1574-5]. 

1575 Stephen son of Robert Hincklie bapt. 2 February [1575-6]. 
1577 Stephen son of Robert Hincklie buried 10 April. 

1577 John Hinckley senior and paterfamilias buried 25 June. 

1578 Stephen son of Robert Hinckley bapt. 15 February [1578-9]. 
1580 Margaret (laughter of Robert Hincklie bapt. 30 Oct. 

1582 Elizabeth (laughter of Robert Hinckley bapt. 30 September. 
1587 Mary daughter of Robert Hynckley bapt. 5 February [1587-8]. 

* The parish register is badly kept. Some items in it are not to be found in the 
Transcripts, and vice versa. 



1911] Genealogical Research in England 315 

1.588 Richerden daughter of Henry Hinckley bapt. 3 February [1588-9]. 

1589 "vicesimo Quinto Maij. Samvell filius Roberti hinckley baptizatus 

fuit." 

1590 John Hinckley paterfami' buried 13 February [1590-1]. 

1591 Sara daughter of Henry hynckley bapt. 19 October. 
1593 John son of Henry Hinckley bapt. 26 August. 
1596 George son of Henry Hinckley bapt. 24 May. 

1598 Margaret daughter of Robert Hinckley buried 30 April. 
1600 Susanna daughter of Henry Hincklye bapt. 5 July. 
1606 Robert Hinckley buried 27 March. 
1606 Ann daughter of Thomas Hincklie bapt. 21 Sept. 

1609 Robart son of Thomas Hincklie bapt. 2 June. 

1610 Isaac Hincklie and Dorothie Quested both of Harrietsham married 

11 June by license dated 1 June. 

1611 Isaac Hinckley churchwarden. 

1611 George son of Isaac Hinckley bapt. 13 May. 

1612 James son of Isaacke Hincklye bapt. 14 March [1612-13]. 

1613 Edward son of Thomas Hinckley bapt. 20 June. 

1615 Thomas son of Isaacke Hincklye bapt. 11 June. 
1617 Elizabeth Hinckley bapt. 20 September. 

1617 Dorrethy Hinckley bapt. 12 October. 

1624 Symon son of Isaac Hincklie bapt. 31 March. 

1625 Ane daughter of Isaac Hinckley bapt. 3 April. 

1628 Frances daughter of Isaac Hinckley bapt. 15 October. 

1634 Katherina wife of Henry Hincklye buried 11 November. 

1635 Isaac Hincklie Paterfamilias of Vlcombe buried 26 July. 
1638 Henrye Hinckley householder buried 26 August. 

Hinckley Entries in the Registers of St. Mildred's Church, 

Tenterden, 1544-1 638* 

Baptisms 

1622 John Ilinckly son of Samuell Hinckly 28 April. 

1 <;2o Susannah Ilincklev daughter of Samuell Hinckley 6 November. 

1627 Marie daughter of\Samuell Hinkley 23 March [1627-8]. 

162!) Sarah daughter of Samuell Hinckley 22 November. 

1631 Mary daughter of Samuel! Hinkley 18 September. 

1632 Elizabeth daughter of Samuell Hinckley 10 March [1632-3]. 
1634 John son of Samuell Hinckley and of Sarah his wife 1 June. 

Burials 

1627 John son of Samuell Hinckley 25 February [1627-8]. 
l*).'lo Elizabeth daughter of Samueil Ilincklev 18 June. 

Hinckley Entries in tin: Bishop's Transcript of Milton by 

Sittingboubne 

1608 Steven Iliuekle and Jane Becke married 24 November. 

1600 Martha daughter of Steven Hincle bapt. 4 Eebruary [1609-10]. 

1612 Richard boh of Steven Hincle bapt. 10 May. 

1614 Robert ->>u of Steven Hincle bapt. H January [1614-15]. 

1616 and 1017 Steven Iliuekle churchwarden. 

1617 James and Elizabeth son and daughter of Steven Hincklye bapt. 27 

July. 

* There are no Hinckley marriages in the registers. 



316 Genealogical Research in England [Oct. 

1624 Richard son of Stephen Hinkley buried 4 July. 

1625 Elizabeth wife of Stephen Hinkly buried 23 December. 

1627 Stephen Hinkle and Elizabeth Tolpott married 7 February [1 627-8]. 

1628 Nevell Kempe and Martha Hinckle married 13 January [1628-9]. 

From the Tax Lists, Kent 

37 Henry VIII. Lathe of Aylesford, Hundred of Eyhorne, Harytsham. 
John Hynckley for lands, 1 Os. 

(Lay Subsidy, vol. 125, fo. 307. Public Record Office.) 

[The foregoing wills and entries give the following Hinckley pedigree : 

1. Robert Henkle of Lenham, co. Kent, the testator of 1522, died 

between 30 Dec. 1522 and 4 Feb. following. He married Johane, 
who survived him and was executrix of his will. 
Child : 

i. Isabell, of legal age in 1522. 

2. John Henkle, brother of the foregoing, was overseer of his will. 

No will of his own has been found, but he was probably father of 

3. John Htnckleye of Harrietsham,* the testator of 1577, who was 

buried at Harrietsham 25 June 1577. He married first probably 
Johane, who was buried at Harrietsham 23 Jan. 1563-4 ; married 
secondly at Harrietsham, 3 July 1570, Aves Elles, who survived 
him. 
Children by first wife : 

4. i. John. 

5. ii. Kobert. 

iii. Anne, bapt. at Harrietsham 8 October 1539 ; probably m. Lytle- 

hare, and had a dau. Katherine, not mentioned by name in her 
father's will. 

Child by second wife : 
iv. Annes or Agnes, bapt. at Harrietsham 1 Jan. 1571-2. 

4. John Hinckley of Harrietsham was buried there 13 Feb. 1590-1. 

He married there, 9 Oct. 1553, Johane Bills. No will or ad- 
ministration of his has been found. 
Children, baptized at Harrietsham : 

i. A daughter, bapt. betw. 1 Nov. 1557 and 7 Feb. 1557-8. 

ii. Margaret, bapt. 28 Feb. 1559-60. 

6. iii. Henry, bapt. 21 June 1562. 
iv. Diamina, bapt. 12 Nov. 1564. 

v. John, bapt. probably abt. 1566. f 

5. Kobert Hinckley of Harrietsham, the testator of 1605, was buried 

there 27 Mar. 1606. He married first Elizabeth , who 

was buried at Harrietsham 2 Nov. 1574. He married secondly 

* The village of Harrietsham lies next to Lenham, and seven miles southeast of 
Maidstone. It contains a very ancient church, the earliest part of which is said to 
date from 1150. The old font, in which doubtless the Hinckley children were baptized, 
still remains. Steden Street, where one of John Hynckley's tenements was, is not 
a name known to the present inhabitants of Harrietsham, but it seems probable that 
it was in that part of the village where rises Stede Hill, at the foot of which nestles the 
church, and on the crest on which is Stede Court. 

t The years 1564-9 are missing in the Registers and B. T. ' 



1911] Genealogical Research in England 317 

there, 10 Feb. 1574-5, Katherine Leese, widow. She may- 
have been the widow of Thomas Leese of Throwley, who died in 
1574. She died probably before 1605, as her husband does not 
mention her in his will. 
Children by first wife, baptized at Harrietsham : 

7. i. Thomas, bapt. 28 Dec. 1562. 

ii. Clemen, bapt. 1570 ; not mentioned in her father's will. 

8. iii. Isaac, bapt. 8 Oct. 1571. 

Children by second wife, baptized at Harrietsham : 

iv. Stephen, bapt. 2 Feb. 1575-6 ; bur. at Harrietsham 10 Apr. 1577. 

9. v. Stephen, bapt. 15 Feb. 1578-9. 

vi. Margaret, bapt. 30 Oct. 1580; bur. at Harrietsham 30 Apr. 1598. 

vii. Elizabeth, bapt. 30 Sept. 1582 ; m. and bad daughter Cicely, men- 
tioned in her grandfather's will. 

viii. Catherine, b. probably abt. 1584-5 ; mentioned in her father's will. 

ix. Mary, bapt. 5 Feb. 1587-8 ; mentioned in her father's will. 
10. x. Samuel, bapt. 25 May 1589. 

xi. John, b. probably abt. 1591 ; mentioned as a minor in his father's 
will. 

6. Henry Hinckley, baptized at Harrietsham 21 June 1562, was 

buried there 26 Aug. 1638. No will or administration of his has 
been found. He married Katherine, who was buried at Harriet- 
sham, where they lived, 11 Nov. 1634. 
Children baptized at Harrietsham : 

i. Kecharde, bapt. 3 Feb. 1588-9; m. How; living in 1661-2. 

ii. Sara, bapt. 19 Oct. 1591. 
iii. John, bapt. 26 Aug. 1593. 

iv. George, bapt. 24 May 1596 ; the testator of 1661-2; lived at Sand- 
wich. 
v. Susanna, bapt. 5 July 1600; m. Adams; living in 1661-2. 

7. Thomas Hinckley of Harrietsham and Ulcombe, yeoman, the tes- 

tator of 1634, was baptized at Harrietsham 28 Dec. 1562, and died 
between 3 Dec. 1634 and 16 Jan. following. He married Ann 

, who survived him and was executrix of his will. He lived 

at Harrietsham (where he was a churchwarden in 1609) until after 
1617, but at the time of making his will he was of Ulcombe. 
Children, baptized at Harrietsham : 

i. Ann, bapt. 21 Sept. 1606; m. ; she and her three children, 

Thomas^ Edward, and Martha were living in 1634. 
ii. Robert, bapt. 2 June 1609, living in 1635. 
iii. Edward, bapt. 20 June 1613; living in 1634. 
iv. Elizabeth, bapt. 20 Sept. 1617; living in 1634. 

8. Isaac Hinckley, baptized at Harrietsham 8 Oct. 1571, was bur- 

ied there 26 July 1635. He married at Harrietsham, 11 June 
1610, Dorothy Quested of that place, who survived him and 
to whom administration on his estate was granted 28 Sept. 1636, 
her sons George Hinckley of Brom field, husbandman, and James 
Hinckly of Linstead, husbandman, being bound in the sum of 
£140 (twice the value of the personal estate). Isaac Hinckley's 
children were all baptized at Harrietsham, where he apparently lived 
until after 1628, but his burial record describes him as of Ulcombe. 
He was a churchwarden of Harrietsham in 1611. 



318 Genealogical Research in England [Oct. 

Children, baptized at Harrietsham : 

i. George, bapt. 13 May 1611; of Bromfleld, husbandman, in 1636 ; m. 

and had a son James living in 1678. 
ii. James, bapt. 14 Mar. 1612-13 ; m. Mary , the testator of 1678. 

See his will, supra, for children, 
iii. Thomas, bapt. 11 June 1615. 
iv. Dorothy, bapt. 12 Oct. 1617. 
v. Symon. bapt 31 Mar. 1624; living in 1678. 
vi. Ann, bapt. 3 Apr. 1625. 
vii. Frances, bapt. 15 Oct. 1628 ; m. Crumpe ; a widow in 1678. 

* 

9. Stephen Hinckle of Milton by Sittingbourne, yeoman, the testator 
of 1629-30, baptized at Harrietsham 15 Feb. 1578-9, died be- 
tween 1 and 27 Jan. 1629-30. He married first at Milton, 24 
Nov. 1608, Jane Becke. The date of her death is unknown, but 
she was probably the mother of his first three children, if not of 
all ; married secondly Elizabeth , who was buried at Mil- 
ton 23 Dec. 1625 ; married thirdly there, 7 Feb 1627-8, Eliza- 
beth Tolpott. He was churchwarden of Milton in 1616 and 
1617. 

Children, baptized at Milton : 

i. Martha, bapt. 4 Feb. 1609-10; m. 13 Jan. 1628-9, Nevbll Kempe 

of Milton, currier, and had a daughter Frances mentioned in her 

grandfather's will, 
ii. Richard, bapt. 10 May 1612 ; bur. at Milton 4 July 1624. 
iii. Robert, bapt. 8 Jan. 1614-5 ; mentioned in his father's will. 
iv. James (twin), bapt. 27 July 1617 ; probably d. young ; not mentioned 

in his father's will, 
v. Elizabeth (twin), bapt. 27 July 1617; mentioned in her father's 

will. 

10. Samuel Hinckley of Tenterden, co. Kent, and of Scituate and 
Barnstable, New England, baptized at Harrietsham 25 May 1589, 
married first Sarah, whose maiden name is unknown, although 
the records of a dozen parishes around Tenterden and Harrietsham 
have been searched for this marriage and for the baptism of their 
son, Governor Thomas Hinckley. Samuel Hinckley came to New 
England in the ship Hercules in March, 1634-5, accompanied by 
his wife Sarah and four children, whose names are not given in 
the passenger list. He settled at Scituate, where he was admitted 
freeman 7 Feb. 1636-7. Later he removed to Barnstable, where 
he was juror and town officer. His wife Sarah was admitted to 
the church 30 Aug. 1635, and died 18 Aug. 1656. He married 
secondly, 15 Dec. 1657, Bridget Bodfish, who survived him. 
He died 31 Oct. 1662. There is a brief abstract of his will in the 
Register, vol. 6, p. 95. 
Children, all by first wife : 

i. Thomas, b. probably abt. 1619, the well-known Governor of Ply- 
mouth Colony; m. twice, and had issue. 

ii. John, bapt. at Tenterden 28 Apr. 1622 ; bur. there 25 Feb. 1627-8. 

iii. Susannah, bapt. at Tenterden 6 Nov. 1625; m. abt. 13 June 1643, 
Rev. John Smith, and had issue. 

iv. Marie, bapt. at Tenterden 23 Mar. 1627-8 ; probably d. young. 

v. Sarah, bapt. at Tenterden 22 Nov. 1629 ; m. 12 Dec. 1619, Henry 
Cobb, and had issue. 

vi. Mary, bapt. at Tenterden 18 Sept. 1631 ; m. bef. 1662. 

vii. Elizabeth, bapt. at Tenterden 10 Mar. 1632-3 ; bur. there 18 June 
1633. 



1911] Genealogical Research hi England 319 

viii. John, bapt. at Tenterden 1 June 1634; probably d. young. 

ix. Elizabkth, bapt. at Scituate 6 Sept. 1035 ; m. 15 July 1657, Elisha 

Pabker, and had issue. 
x. Samuel, bapt. at Scituate 4 Feb. 1637-8; d. young, 
xi. Samuel, bapt. at Scituate 10 Feb. 1638-9; d. young, 
xii. A daughter, bur. 8 July 1640, unbapt. 

• • • - 

x . m * I Twin children, bur. 1641. 

XIV. J 

xv. Samuel, bapt. at Barnstable 24 July 1642; m. (1) 14 Dec. 1664, 
Mary Goodspked, dau. of Roger; m. (2) 15 Jan. 1669, Mary 
Fitzkandle, daughter of Edward; had issue, 
xvi. John, bapt. at Barnstable 26 May 1644; m. (1) in July 1668, Bethia 
Lothrop; m. (2) 24 Nov. 1697, Mary Goodspeed ; had issue. 
See Savage, Gen. Die, vol. 2, pp. 424-6; Pope, Pioneers of Mass., p. 231; 
Swift, Barnstable Families, vol. 2, p. 30 ff. E. F.] 

Sealis 

Sealis Entries in the Registers of All Saints Church, 

Biddenden, 1538-1638 

1538 Clement Ceelye bapt. 2 February [1538-9]. 

1545 Syinond Selys bapt. 20 July. 

1547 Stephen son of John Selys bapt. 18 September. 

1547 Stephen son of John Selys buried 28 September. 

1551 Rachell Seelys bapt. 19 April. 

1551 Symond Zelvs buried 30 July.* 

1553 John son of John Selys bapt. 17 December. 

155 G Thomas son of Richard Selys bapt. 18 November. 

1565 Chrystopher Selys and Joane married 17 August. 

1567 John Tomsett and Katterin Sellice married 25 November. 

1567 Katterin daughter of Christopher Seelis bapt. 21 December. 

1570 Father Seelis householder buried 7 August. 

1570 Thomas son of Christopher Seelis bapt. 17 September. 

1571 Martha daughter of William Seelis bapt. 21 September. 

1571 Mercye daughter of Christopher Seelis bapt. 13 January [1571-21. 

1575 Dorotye daughter of Christopher Seelis bapt. 4 September. 

1576 J one wile of Christopher Seelis buried 18 May. 

1 576 Christopher Seelis and Alles Sedweeke married 4 February [ 1 576-7]. 

1577 John Edburrowe and Susanna Seelis married 11 November. 

1578 John Seelis and Marye Stedman married 28 April. 
1578 John son of John Seelis bapt. 22 February [1578-91. 
1570 Elizabeth daughter of Christopher Seelis bapt. 12 July. 

1580 Finer daughter of Christopher Seelis bapt. 5 March [1580-1], 

1581 Richard son of John Seelis bapt. 26 November. 

1584 Francis son of Christopher Seelis bapt. 1 March [1584-5]. 

1585 Francis son of Christopher Seelis buried 8 July. 

1586 Anne daughter of John Seelis bapt. 18 September. 
1586 Phillis daughter of Christopher Seelis bapt, 30 October. 
1589 An infant of Christopher Seelis buried unbaptized 27 March. 
1581) Thomas son of Christopher Seelis bapt. 2!) Jul v. 

1500 Mary daughter of Christopher Seelis bapt. 30 January [1590-1]. 

1502 Mary daughter of John Seelis bapt. 2 April. 

1593 Anne daughter of John Seelis buried 1 >\ August. 

1504 Elizabeth daughter of John Seelis bapt. 23 February [1594-5]. 

* During this month the plague raged in Biddenden, Tenlerdcn, and the surround- 
ing country. 



320 Genealogical Research in England [Oct. 

1595 Wacher Whittenton and Mercy Seeles married 9 June. 

1598 Moses son of John Seelis bapt. 21 May. 

1G05 Elizabeth daughter of John Seelis bapt. 9 June. 

1608 Sara daughter of Richard Seelis bapt. 11 September. 
1G08 Steven Marketman and Phillis Seelis married 19 September. 
1G08 Margaret daughter of Richard Seelis bapt. 17 January [1608-9]. 

1 609 Elizabeth daughter of Richard Seelis bapt. 24 December. 
1609 John Seelis an aged man buried 10 February [1609-10]. 
1612 Ye wife of Richard Seelis buried 10 August. 

1612 Thomas Seelis and Dorothy Shoesmith married 16 February [1612- . 

13]. 

1613 Richard Seelis and Margery Lea married 4 May. 

1614 Widow Seelis buried 6 May. 

1614 Hannah daughter of Richard Seelis bapt. 8 January [1614-15]. 

1615 Alice wife of Christopher Seelis buried 18 August. 
1617 Mary daughter of Thomas Sealis bapt. 14 September. 

1617 Christefer Seelis householder buried 18 February [1617-18]. 

1618 A child of Richard Seelis buried unbaptized 9 May. 

1619 Hester daughter of Richard Seelis bapt. 26 September. 
1621 Marie daughter of Thomas Seelis buried 5 June. 

1621 A child of Richard Seelis buried unbaptized 3 December. 

1622 Thomas Springett and Mercye Seelis married 5 November. 

1625 Richard son of Thomas Seelis bapt. 17 April. 

1626 Thomas Markettman and Mary Seelis married 27 July. 
1630 Laurence Wlntten and Margaret Seelis married 8 April. 
1633 Richarde Newman and Elizabeth Seelis married 24 October. 

Sealis Entries in the Church Registers of Frittenden, 1558-1638 

Baptisms 

1565 Martha daughter of Xpofer Seelis 28 October. 
1601 Margaret daughter of Richard Seelis 1 August. 

Marriages 
1607 Jervis Seelis and Johan Leeds, widow, married 29 November. 

Burials 

1612 Alice Seelis widow buried 12 April. 

1618 Gervase Seeles a poor man buried 30 January [1618-19]. 

From the Bishop's Transcripts of Benenden 

1567-8 [between October and October